• Undergraduate Course Blogs
  • Undergraduate
    • DMS 000 3D Printing Workshop

      Lessner, Elisabeth :: Feb 13th/Feb 27th/March 5th :: 11am-3 pm :: CFA246

      3D printing workshop is a 1credit course in the spring term for both grads and undergrads. The workshop will take place over three 4hr sessions spaced out over the course of a month . The first session will focus on the basics of 3-d printing and introduce solid modeling software like Autocad and Sketchup. The second two sessions will follow 2 weeks later and focus on printing your designs.

      We’ve setup an early deadline of Nov 15th for registration in order to gauge the interest for this course. Please contact elessner@buffalo.edu if you are interested.

    • DMS 000 3D Printing Workshop

      Lessner, Elisabeth :: Feb 13th/Feb 27th/March 5th :: 11am-3 pm :: CFA246

      3D printing workshop is a 1credit course in the spring term for both grads and undergrads. The workshop will take place over three 4hr sessions spaced out over the course of a month . The first session will focus on the basics of 3-d printing and introduce solid modeling software like Autocad and Sketchup. The second two sessions will follow 2 weeks later and focus on printing your designs.

      We’ve setup an early deadline of Nov 15th for registration in order to gauge the interest for this course. Please contact elessner@buffalo.edu if you are interested.

    • DMS 101 Basic Film Making

      Staff :: T R , 3:00 – 4:50 PM :: CFA286
      REG#24338 

      This course is intended to provide a basic introduction to 16mm film production. Classes will include screenings, lectures, and demonstrations. Students will learn basic camera operation, lighting, editing, and sound acquisition. In addition, the course will explore the critical relationship between theory and practice in the context of film production. Students will be required to complete collaborative class projects, individual assignments, and a critical paper. Each student will also be required to complete a short, non-sync, 16mm film project. Class materials will cost approx. $150. Lab fee: $100. Class size is strictly limited.

      Fulfills Basic Production Requirement.

    • DMS 101 Basic Filmmaking

      Session J
      Scime
      reg# 12512
      This course is intended to provide a basic introduction to 16mm film production. Classes will include screenings, lectures, and demonstrations. Students will learn basic camera operation, lighting, editing, and sound acquisition. In addition, the course will explore the critical relationship between theory and practice in the context of film production. Students will be required to complete collaborative class projects, individual assignments, and a critical paper. Each student will also be required to complete a short, non-sync, 16mm film project. Class materials will cost approx. $150. Lab fee: $100. Class size is strictly limited. Fulfills Basic Production Requirement.

    • DMS 103 Basic Video

      Session J
      Cathleen Grado
      reg# 12041

      This course is a basic introduction to the tools and techniques of video production. Students will become familiar with using video and develop strategies for its application as an alternative medium of communication. Crucial to this project is the concurrent development of a critical perspective on mainstream media culture. Video art screenings and readings in media theory will critically address the relations between viewers, producers, and the media. Students must expect to acquire materials and texts costing approx. $50.00 to be used in exercises in classroom presentations. Access to equipment and editing facilities will be available. Lab fee: $100. Class size is strictly limited. Fulfills Basic Production Requirement.

    • DMS 103 Basic Video

      Staff :: TuTh 3:00PM-4:50PM :: CFA 286
      REG#15415

      This course is a basic introduction to the tools and techniques of video production. Students will become familiar with using video and develop strategies for its application as an alternative medium of communication. Crucial to this project is the concurrent development of a critical perspective on mainstream media culture. Video art screenings and readings in media theory will critically address the relations between viewers, producers, and the media. Students must expect to acquire materials and texts costing approx. $50.00 to be used in exercises in classroom presentations. Access to equipment and editing facilities will be available. Lab fee: $125. Class size is strictly limited.

      Fulfills Basic Production Requirement.

    • DMS 103 Basic Video

      Kraning :: TuTh 11:00AM-12:50PM :: CFA 286
      REG# 15586

      This course is a basic introduction to the tools and techniques of video production. Students will become familiar with using video and develop strategies for its application as an alternative medium of communication. Crucial to this project is the concurrent development of a critical perspective on mainstream media culture. Video art screenings and readings in media theory will critically address the relations between viewers, producers, and the media. Students must expect to acquire materials and texts costing approx. $50.00 to be used in exercises in classroom presentations. Access to equipment and editing facilities will be available. Lab fee: $125. Class size is strictly limited.

      Fulfills Basic Production Requirement.

    • DMS 103A Basic Video

      Kraning :: MoWe 1:00PM-2:50PM :: CFA 286
      REG# 22963

      This course is a basic introduction to the tools and techniques of video production. Students will become familiar with using video and develop strategies for its application as an alternative medium of communication. Crucial to this project is the concurrent development of a critical perspective on mainstream media culture. Video art screenings and readings in media theory will critically address the relations between viewers, producers, and the media. Students must expect to acquire materials and texts costing approx. $50.00 to be used in exercises in classroom presentations. Access to equipment and editing facilities will be available. Lab fee: $125. Class size is strictly limited.

      Fulfills Basic Production Requirement.

    • DMS 103C Basic Video

      staff :: MW 3:00 – 4:50PM :: CFA 286
      REG# 23999

      This course is a basic introduction to the tools and techniques of video production. Students will become familiar with using video and develop strategies for its application as an alternative medium of communication. Crucial to this project is the concurrent development of a critical perspective on mainstream media culture. Video art screenings and readings in media theory will critically address the relations between viewers, producers, and the media. Students must expect to acquire materials and texts costing approx. $50.00 to be used in exercises in classroom presentations. Access to equipment and editing facilities will be available. Lab fee: $125. Class size is strictly limited.

      Fulfills Basic Production Requirement.

    • DMS 103SEM J Basic Video

      Staff :: M/W 9:00AM-12:40PM :: CFA 278
      REG#12386

      This course is a basic introduction to the tools and techniques of video production. Students will become familiar with using video and develop strategies for its application as an alternative medium of communication. Crucial to this project is the concurrent development of a critical perspective on mainstream media culture. Video art screenings and readings in media theory will critically address the relations between viewers, producers, and the media. Students must expect to acquire materials and texts costing approx. $50.00 to be used in exercises in classroom presentations. Access to equipment and editing facilities will be available. Lab fee: $100. Class size is strictly limited. Fulfills Basic Production Requirement.

    • DMS 105 Basic Documentary

      staff :: TuTh 1:00PM-2:50PM :: CFA 286
      REG#23695

      This course will present students with the fundamental, theoretical, creative, and technical concerns of documentary and video production. Students will be introduced to methods of research, production design, approach to subject, interviewing and the structuring of information, as well as the technical video skills of camera work, sound recording, and lighting and editing, as they apply specifically to the documentary process. The demands of documentary expression require preparation with a different emphasis from that which applies to the personal and experimental approaches to film making and video making. Materials and texts will cost approx. $50. Lab fee: $125. Class size is strictly limited.

      Fulfills Basic Production Requirement.

    • DMS 105 Basic Documentary

      Kraning :: MoWe 9:30AM-10:50AM :: CFA 286
      REG#23695

      This course will present students with the fundamental, theoretical, creative, and technical concerns of documentary and video production. Students will be introduced to methods of research, production design, approach to subject, interviewing and the structuring of information, as well as the technical video skills of camera work, sound recording, and lighting and editing, as they apply specifically to the documentary process. The demands of documentary expression require preparation with a different emphasis from that which applies to the personal and experimental approaches to film making and video making. Materials and texts will cost approx. $50. Lab fee: $125. Class size is strictly limited.

      Fulfills Basic Production Requirement.

    • DMS 105A Basic Documentary

      staff :: M/W 11:00am-12:50pm :: CFA 286
      REG#17263

      This course will present students with the fundamental, theoretical, creative, and technical concerns of documentary and video production. Students will be introduced to methods of research, production design, approach to subject, interviewing and the structuring of information, as well as the technical video skills of camera work, sound recording, and lighting and editing, as they apply specifically to the documentary process. The demands of documentary expression require preparation with a different emphasis from that which applies to the personal and experimental approaches to film making and video making. Materials and texts will cost approx. $50. Lab fee: $125. Class size is strictly limited.

      Fulfills Basic Production Requirement.

    • DMS 107 Film & Media History I

      Colleran :: Mo12:00AM-12:00AM :: TBA
      REG#15888

      This course will survey the aesthetic and technological development of cinema from its inception to World War II. We will look at a range of films from the silent era, to early Hollywood, Weimar Germany, and Russia to historically and culturally contextualize the advances of pre-World War II cinema. In doing so, this course will provide students with the skills to analyze visual texts and provide them with a technical vocabulary to discuss how films create meaning. Additionally, students will develop a better understanding of how films are a part of the socio-political landscape in which they are produced.

      Fulfills Introduction Interpretation Requirement.

    • DMS 108 J Film and Media History

      Session J
      Bouscaren :: T/TH 9-12:50 :: CFA 232
      REG#12387

      Film History will expose students to screenings and scholarship chronicling the political and technological conditions of film production from the 1890’s to the present. We will broadly examine early motion pictures, pre-code Hollywood, German Expressionism, French Impressionism and Surrealism, Soviet Montage, Neorealist, the French New Wave, Post-Colonial African filmmaking, 1970’s Hollywood, digital filmmaking, and large format documentary. Attendance, readings, weekly response journal, and research paper are required.

    • DMS 108 M Film History II

      Session M
      Roussel :: Online Course
      reg# 10288

      This course is a survey of significant films produced between 1945 through the late 1970’s. Movements/films will include post -WWII US [Wyler’s The Best Years of Our Lives], Italian Neo-Realism [DeSica’s Bicycle Thief], French New Wave [ Godard’s Masculine/Feminine] as well as a selection of filmmakers from the 1960’s and 70’s including Fellini, Bergman, etc. Since this was not only a productive time for film but for film theory as well I include important critical works that provide a context for these films.
      This is an on-line course. Students are expected to access these films on their own. Where possible, I’ve chosen films that stream on Netflix but this is just a suggestion. Beyond viewing of the films themselves, the critical readings will be provided to students through the course website. In addition there will be regular chat room meetings, a course blog. Assignments include short essays on the films, regular responses to the critical readings and a final. Fulfills Introduction to Analysis requirement.

    • DMS 109 FILM INTERPRETATION

      Staff :: TR 9:00am-10:50am :: CFA 112
      REG#15599

      Film Aesthetics have had an enormous impact on the development of media, from television to the internet to video games, as well as on our personal experiences of our everyday lives: “I feel like I’m in a movie!” This course provides an introduction to the main concepts and themes that constitute the rapidly expanding field of Film Studies. In this course, we will learn to recognize the techniques and conventions that structure our experience of cinema – narrative, mise-en-scene, cinematography, editing, sound, genre – in order to understand how these various components combine to yield an overall sense of film form. We will survey global film history, critically viewing examples of silent film, classical Hollywood, world cinema, experimental, documentary, and independent narrative film. We will also examine isolated clips from a variety of films as they relate to the weekly discussion topics.

      Fulfills Intro To Interpretation Requirement.

    • DMS 109 Intro Film & Media Interp

      Coletta,Neil L :: Online
      Reg#12054

    • DMS 109 M Intro Film & Media Interp

      Shilina-Conte ::Online
      REG#12388

      In 1926 Virginia Woolf aptly stated in her essay that “while all the other arts were born naked, has been born fully-clothed.” In the art of
      storytelling, cinema is greatly indebted to literature, as it borrowed many of its readymade techniques and devices. However, the relationship between the verbal and the visual within the moving image has always been a question of a great dispute, with cinema striving to achieve an independent status as the seventh art. In this class we will look at traditional and experimental ways that word and image correlate and function together in narrative, documentary andexperimental films. During the course of six weeks we will explore the art of the title sequence, survey the history of intertitles and subtitles, and consider avant-garde techniques of scratching and applying text directly onto the celluloid. Our special agenda in this class will be to scrutinize instances of irrational/serial montage, manifested by the use of black and white screens with signage, which suppress the visual but foreground the textual, inviting the spectator to fashion an image in the mind’s eye. From these reservoirs of invisible evidence in film swarm forth a host of critical issues such as ethnicity, race, sexuality, gender, ethics, trauma, censorship and the suppression of history and memory. We will expand our critical vocabulary, discussing such movements as Lettrisme and Fluxus and tackling such concepts as paratext, iconicity and ekphrasis. Films and excerpts by David Fincher, Hiroshi Tashigahara, Jean-Luc Godard, Peter Greenaway, Charles Sheeler and Paul Strand, Stan Brakhage, Su Friedrich, Norman McLaren, Rea Tajiri, Julia Meltzer and David Thorne, etc. will be considered. All articles and excerpts from books will be posted regularly on UB Learns, but since the course will be taught online,
      students should be prepared to purchase three or four films that we will be analyzing in this class or acquire them via alternative routes. Links to some films and excerpts will be provided. Fulfills Intro To Interpretation Requirement.

    • DMS 110 M Intro Programming

      session M
      Wilson :: Online
      reg # 12389

      Interested in learning about how computer games are made? Want to make one yourself?!

      DMS 110 – Programming for Digital Art equips students with the skills they need to create their own computer games (or similarly algorithmic digital media) and also prepares them to excel in other exciting Media Study courses later in their academic career. It’s one of the first steps that can be taken towards earning the department’s Game Studies Certificate, and it fulfills a basic production requirement!

      No previous programming experience is necessary to take the class! DMS 110 assumes absolutely no knowledge of the subject, and its goal is to show that computer programming isn’t just for hacker prodigies and math geniuses. It’s for everybody, and it’s a lot of fun!

      This summer, find out just how much fun computer programming is! Whether you’re interested in making games or another kind of algorithmic art, your voice is more than welcome in the chorus of game designers and digital media artists!

      This online class will run from July 1st to August 9th. If you have any questions about the course, send an e-mail to devin@devinwilson.net.

      Beginner programming course geared towards Media Study majors with little to no experience who want to pursue Programming Graphics, Game Design and Virtual Reality. This course introduces basic concepts of Computer Science with the Python programming language, while incorporating a Media Study perspective. Non Majors welcome if space available. Lab fee: $100. Fulfills Basic Production Requirement.

    • DMS 110 Programming For Digital Art

      Geistweidt :: TuTh 11:00AM-12:50PM  :: CFA 244
      REG#15105

      Beginner programming course geared towards Media Study majors with little to no experience who want to pursue Programming Graphics, Game Design and Virtual Reality. This course introduces basic concepts of Computer Science with the javascript programming language, while incorporating a Media Study perspective. Non Majors welcome if space available. Lab fee: $125.

      Fulfills Basic Production Requirement.

    • DMS 110 Programming For Digital Art

      staff :: M/W 11am-12:50pm :: CFA 244
      REG#15259

      Beginner programming course geared towards Media Study majors with little to no experience who want to pursue Programming Graphics, Game Design and Virtual Reality. This course introduces basic concepts of Computer Science with the Python programming language, while incorporating a Media Study perspective. Non Majors welcome if space available. Lab fee: $125.

      Fulfills Basic Production Requirement.

    • DMS 110 Programming For Digital Art

      staff :: TuTh 1:00PM-2:50PM :: CFA 244
      REG#21176

      Beginner programming course geared towards Media Study majors with little to no experience who want to pursue Programming Graphics, Game Design and Virtual Reality. This course introduces basic concepts of Computer Science with the javascript programming language, while incorporating a Media Study perspective. Non Majors welcome if space available. Lab fee: $125.

      Fulfills Basic Production Requirement.

    • DMS 121 Basic Digital Arts

      staff :: T/TH 11:00am – 12:50pm :: CFA 244
      REG#17344

      This course is an introduction to computer-based media production in the context of contemporary internet tools and techniques. The course covers image and sound editing & manipulation, web development, and interactive design. Crucial to this project is the concurrent development of a critical perspective on mainstream media culture. Viewing/Interacting with contemporary web-based art projects, interventionist art & Hacktivism, and readings in media theory will critically address the relations between viewers, producers, and media. Lab fee: $125.

      Fulfills Basic Production Requirement.

    • DMS 121 Basic Digital Arts

      staff :: TuTh 4:00PM-5:50PM :: CFA 244
      REG#17807

      This course is an introduction to computer-based media production in the context of contemporary internet tools and techniques. The course covers image and sound editing & manipulation, web development, and interactive design. Crucial to this project is the concurrent development of a critical perspective on mainstream media culture. Viewing/Interacting with contemporary web-based art projects, interventionist art & Hacktivism, and readings in media theory will critically address the relations between viewers, producers, and media. Lab fee: $125.

      Fulfills Basic Production Requirement.

    • DMS 121 Basic Digital Arts

      staff :: MoWe 11:00AM-12:50PM :: CFA 244
      REG#22310

      This course is an introduction to computer-based media production in the context of contemporary internet tools and techniques. The course covers image and sound editing & manipulation, web development, and interactive design. Crucial to this project is the concurrent development of a critical perspective on mainstream media culture. Viewing/Interacting with contemporary web-based art projects, interventionist art & Hacktivism, and readings in media theory will critically address the relations between viewers, producers, and media. Lab fee: $125.

      Fulfills Basic Production Requirement

    • DMS 121 J Basic Digital Arts

      Session J
      Curry :: Monday-Wednesday 9:00AM – 12:50PM :: CFA 244
      reg# 12390

      This course will present fundamental concepts and methods that underlie the use of computers in generating and processing digital works and examine them in the context of contemporary artistic practice in painting, photography, film, and video. The impact of computers, both present and potential, on the more traditional arts will be discussed. Through the use of imaging audio and presentation software, students will explore the various ways in which computers deal with images, sound and structures, adapting these methods to produce work of their own. Work by contemporary artists working in the digital medium will be shown and examined on a regular basis. The class size is strictly limited. Lab fee: $100. Fulfills Basic Production Requirement.

    • DMS 155 INTRODUCTION TO NEW MEDIA

      Staff :: M/W 11:00AM – 12:50PM :: CFA 244
      Lecture REG#15605
      Lab REG#10694

      This course provides an introduction to design and the production of interactive multimedia. The content of the class will focus on the theoretical and practical aspects of creating and integrating digital media with authoring/presentation tools. This class will lay the foundation for creating interactive projects for the web and will integrate art, journalism, and music through hands-on developmental projects in our new state-of-the-art Mac lab. Students will learn the process and skills necessary to create a web site and an interactive CD-ROM which integrates animation, graphic design, sound, and text, working in Adobe Photoshop, Dreamweaver, Flash animation, and Illustrator. The course will accommodate 48 students. Enroll now! Get the technological edge! Lab fee $100.

      Fulfills Basic Production Requirement.

    • DMS 193 Intro to Journalism

      Galarneau :: W 7-9:40 :: Clemens 19
      REG#19596

    • DMS 193 Intro To Journalism

      Staff :: W 7 – 9:40pm :: location _TBA
      reg#17526

    • DMS 193 Intro To Journalism

      Galarneau :: W 7:00PM – 9:40PM :: TBA
      REG# 18867

      This course is a gateway into the Journalism Certificate program and teaches students to research, report and write news and feature stories for print, broadcast and the web. It also provides an overview of American journalism standards and an introduction to American media and press law.

      Students learn to conduct interviews, use quotes, and write in Associated Press style. They also learn the importance of accuracy, integrity and deadlines. Students analyze the merit and structure of good (and bad) news stories and focus on how journalists tell stories differently in print, radio, TV and on the web.

      Students will have in-class quizzes and take-home writing exercises, designed to help them master the fundamentals of news writing. Those include two stories that students will take from start to finish: shaping a story idea, identifying sources and interviewing them, then crafting the material into final written form. In addition to a textbook, students will read selected stories in class pertinent to class discussions.

      This course is a Pre-requisite to the Journalism Certificate Program.

    • DMS 193 Intro to Journalism

      Galarneau :: We 7:00PM-9:40PM :: Clemen438
      REG#17527

    • DMS 198 UB Seminar: Media-Saturated World

      Pape :: T 9:00AM – 10:00AM :: Cfa 235
      REG# 23668

      This course introduces transfer students to the field of Media Study, focusing on the key forms that constitute media in modern culture. Students develop a critical perspective on mainstream media – considering media as representational forms as well as aesthetic, social, and/or political practices. Students will view/interact with a wide range of media works in the context of media theory that critically addresses the relations between viewers, producers, and consumers. Students will use the UB e-portfolio to assemble and organize their responses to this material.

      As well as theoretically understanding the scope and impact of media in a computer-based society, Media Study involves decoding media representations and being able to create and communicate ideas and information using established and emerging media. Therefore, in this seminar students are introduced to the choices available in the Department of Media Study, in terms of both analytical and production work. Students are also familiarized with the UB Curriculum program and the opportunities to integrate multiple disciplines.

      “For Transfer Students ONLY.”

    • DMS 199 UB Seminar – From Screens to Screens

      Sarlin :: MoWe 11:00AM-12:20PM :: CFA 286
      REG#20749

    • DMS 199 UB Seminar -Making and Being Made by Media

      Lison :: MoWe 1:00PM-2:20PM :: CFA244
      REG#23722

    • DMS 199 UB Seminar: From Screen to Screens

      Elder :: T/TH 3:00PM – 4:20PM :: CFA 235
      REG# 23670

      UB Seminar for incoming freshman, focused on the big ideas and questions of significance in Media Study, to connect with issues of consequence in the wider world. Essential to the UB Curriculum, the Seminar helps students with common learning outcomes focused on fundamental expectations for critical thinking, ethical reasoning, and oral communication, and learning at a university, all within topic focused subject matter. The Seminars provide students with an early connection to UB faculty and the undergraduate experience at a comprehensive, research university. This course is equivalent to any 199 offered in any subject. Students who have previously attempted the course and received a grade of F or R may not be able to repeat the course during the fall or spring semester.”

      Lab fee: $125.

      “Fulfills Basic Production Requirement. For incoming freshmen ONLY.”

    • DMS 199 UB Seminar: From Screen to Screens

      Elder :: T/Th  11:00AM – 12:20PM :: CFA 235
      REG# 23669

      UB Seminar for incoming freshman, focused on the big ideas and questions of significance in Media Study, to connect with issues of consequence in the wider world. Essential to the UB Curriculum, the Seminar helps students with common learning outcomes focused on fundamental expectations for critical thinking, ethical reasoning, and oral communication, and learning at a university, all within topic focused subject matter. The Seminars provide students with an early connection to UB faculty and the undergraduate experience at a comprehensive, research university. This course is equivalent to any 199 offered in any subject. Students who have previously attempted the course and received a grade of F or R may not be able to repeat the course during the fall or spring semester.”

      Lab fee: $125.

      “Fulfills Basic Production Requirement. For incoming freshmen ONLY.”

    • DMS 199 UB Seminar: Making and Being Made by Media

      Glazier :: M 3:00PM – 5:20PM :: CFA 244
      REG# 23671

      UB Seminar for incoming freshman, focused on the big ideas and questions of significance in Media Study, to connect with issues of consequence in the wider world. Essential to the UB Curriculum, the Seminar helps students with common learning outcomes focused on fundamental expectations for critical thinking, ethical reasoning, and oral communication, and learning at a university, all within topic focused subject matter. The Seminars provide students with an early connection to UB faculty and the undergraduate experience at a comprehensive, research university. This course is equivalent to any 199 offered in any subject. Students who have previously attempted the course and received a grade of F or R may not be able to repeat the course during the fall or spring semester.”

      Lab fee: $125.

      “Fulfills Basic Production Requirement. For incoming freshmen ONLY.”

    • DMS 199 UB Seminar: Making and Being Made by Media

      Pape :: MW 1:00PM – 2:20PM :: CFA 242
      REG# 23672

      UB Seminar for incoming freshman, focused on the big ideas and questions of significance in Media Study, to connect with issues of consequence in the wider world. Essential to the UB Curriculum, the Seminar helps students with common learning outcomes focused on fundamental expectations for critical thinking, ethical reasoning, and oral communication, and learning at a university, all within topic focused subject matter. The Seminars provide students with an early connection to UB faculty and the undergraduate experience at a comprehensive, research university. This course is equivalent to any 199 offered in any subject. Students who have previously attempted the course and received a grade of F or R may not be able to repeat the course during the fall or spring semester.”

      Lab fee: $125.

      “Fulfills Basic Production Requirement. For incoming freshmen ONLY.”

    • DMS 200 Visual Speakers Series

      Brose :: M 6:30PM – 8:30PM :: CFA 112
      REG# 20085

      “Exposure to a diversity of mid-career and established professional artists and designers is one of the greatest tools for preparing art and design students to go out into the world. It provides a glimpse of long-term career paths beyond the formal education process, living examples of how others apply their talents in the world. Art and design students need to have role models beyond their teachers – artists and designers who are engaged in life affirming and sustaining work. This one-credit course is designed to supplement and complete the existing curriculum of BFA and BA Art Majors, and consolidates all of our current individual faculty efforts to bring visiting lecturers to campus into a more accessible program. A visual studies speakers series course provides a workable structure for this activity.”

    • DMS 200 Visual Studies Speakers

      Staff :: M 6:30PM – 8:30PM :: CFA112
      Reg#22123

    • DMS 200 Visual Studies Speakers

      Goldfarb :: Mo 6:30PM-8:30PM :: CFA112
      REG#18540

    • DMS 201 Green Media

      Anstey :: MW 12-1:20pm :: CFA112
      Reg#23524

      Contemporary media constructs our understanding of nature and reflects our fears and fantasies about rapidly changing environmental conditions. My Green Media courses analyze projects, (fictional & fact-based) that investigate our relationship to climate change, pollution, environmental justice, wildlife extinction. The courses interpret the word media broadly to include film, games, social media, media-art, big data visualization, simulation and sensing. They look at eco-media issues that unpack questions of the consciousness-raising power of media; material perspectives that trace the physical impact of our media obsessions; biopolitical questions of human/non-human boundaries; and affect-theory-driven examinations of eco- optimism, pessimism, gaia-ism, nihilism. As the anthropocene draws on…

       

    • DMS 211 PLASMA

      Glazier, Loss + Sarlin, Paige + Conrad, Tony :: M, 6:30-9PM :: CFA112
      REG# 24069

      PLASMA — Performances, Lectures, and Screenings in Media Art (PLASMA) is a speaker, film, and media arts series presented by the Department of Media Study and co-sponsored by numerous related SUNY Buffalo departments, programs, institutes, and centers, presenting acclaimed, innovative, and adventurous forays across shifting media-arts boundaries. PLASMA speakers present outstanding currents of thought in the field, including media theory, New Media work, artistic practice, game studies, gender and technology, robotics, locative media, performance, media poetics, and a multiple of related interdisciplinary approaches.

      Enrolling in PLASMA offers the additional opportunities to explore further in depth the issues and ideas at hand. In addition to guest speakers, the 2015 course, will include a screening film series on art and art culture. Course sessions will be led principally by me, with guest speakers being introduced by faculty host presenters. Undergrad students will read a short essay each week, share their work, keep a course journal, and remain impeccable about attendance.

       

      Fulfills Intro to Interpretation or Media and Culture Requirements

    • DMS 211 PLASMA

      Glazier, Loss :: M 6:30 – 9:00PM :: CFA 112
      REG#22430

      Performances, Lectures, and Screenings in Media Art (PLASMA) is a course in which students are exposed to contemporary practices and discourses in media art and culture. Beyond the model of a lecture series course, PLASMA engages students in performative, field-based and workshop encounters with professional practitioners operating at national and international levels of visibility. Roughly every other week brings a guest to the course, with alternating weeks providing an opportunity for screenings, critical reflection and discussion. Readings are assigned to complement topics addressed in the work of guest practitioners, including publications of their own, where relevant. The course is part of the undergraduate foundations sequence in Media Study, but is also open to graduate students who meet in a graduate only section to discuss graduate implications of the course content and to explore further concepts and practices.

      Fulfills Intro to Interpretation or Media and Culture .

    • DMS 211 PLASMA

      Sarlin, Paige :: M 6:00 – 8:40PM :: CFA 112
      REG#22430

      Performances, Lectures, and Screenings in Media Art (PLASMA) is a course in which students are exposed to contemporary practices and discourses in media art and culture. Beyond the model of a lecture series course, PLASMA engages students in performative, field-based and workshop encounters with professional practitioners operating at national and international levels of visibility. Roughly every other week brings a guest to the course, with alternating weeks providing an opportunity for screenings, critical reflection and discussion. Readings are assigned to complement topics addressed in the work of guest practitioners, including publications of their own, where relevant. The course is part of the undergraduate foundations sequence in Media Study, but is also open to graduate students who meet in a graduate only section to discuss graduate implications of the course content and to explore further concepts and practices.

      Fulfills Basic Theory and Intro to Interpretation or Media and Culture.

    • DMS 211 PLASMA

      Waham/Rhee :: M 6- 8:40PM :: CFA 112
      REG#20179

      Performances, Lectures, and Screenings in Media Art (PLASMA) is a course in which students are exposed to contemporary practices and discourses in media art and culture. Beyond the model of a lecture series course, PLASMA engages students in performative, field-based and workshop encounters with professional practitioners operating at national and international levels of visibility. Roughly every other week brings a guest to the course, with alternating weeks providing an opportunity for screenings, critical reflection and discussion. Readings are assigned to complement topics addressed in the work of guest practitioners, including publications of their own, where relevant. The course is part of the undergraduate foundations sequence in Media Study, but is also open to graduate students who meet in a graduate only section to discuss graduate implications of the course content and to explore further concepts and practices.

      Fulfills Basic Theory and Intro to Interpretation or Media and Culture.

    • DMS 212 Green Media

      Anstey,Josephine R :: T/TH 11am – 12:50pm :: CFA 112
      REG# 24236

      Polar bears pacing frantically on melting ice; SUVs gloriously conquering mountain terrain; post-civilization humans struggling for survival on a devastated earth: contemporary media reflects our fears and fantasies about our rapidly changing environment. This course analyzes fictional and documentary media that  investigate our relationship to nature: climate change, pollution, environmental justice, wildlife extinction. The course interprets the word media broadly to include film, games, social media, media-art, big data visualization, simulation and sensing. It examines the consciousness-raising power of film, media and journalism; traces the ecological impact of our obsession with the latest media device; and ponders the relationship between our feelings about our changing planet (denial, engagement, optimism, hopelessness) and our actions.

      Fulfills Basic Theory and Intro to Interpretation.

    • DMS 212 Indian Image On Film

      McCarthy :: T 4:10-6:50 :: Clemens 19
      REG#11611

      Course is crosslisted with American Studies. For more information, refer to the course descriptions on the Department of American Studies website. Fulfills the Media & Culture requirement.

    • DMS 212 Indian Image On Film

      McCarthy,Theresa :: T 4:10 – 6:50pm :: NSC220
      Reg#13741

      Explore Hollywood “Indians” through major motion pictures, B Westerns, documentaries, “indies,” and TV episodes (all viewed in class). See how Indigenous filmmakers use stereotypical representations mixed with humor to counter Hollywood’s legacy. Inves-tigate ways the camera tells a different story than the dialog. Examine the visual impact films have on our perceptions of “Indian” history and cultures. Consider how Hollywood’s reel reality stacks up against the Indigenous real reality.

      Fulfills Basic Theory and Intro to Interpretation or Media and Culture .

    • DMS 212FHI Film History Intensive

      Shilina-Conte :: Online
      reg-10011

      This intensive course in Film History will expose students to screenings and scholarship chronicling the political, social and technological conditions of film production from the 1890’s to the present. We will examine early motion pictures, pre-code Hollywood, German Expressionism, French Impressionism and Surrealism, Soviet Montage, Neorealism, the French New Wave, Post-colonial filmmaking, 1970’s Hollywood, as well as digital and large-format filmmaking. Since the course will be taught online, students will be expected either to be Netflix subscribers or rent / purchase the films we’ll be analyzing in this class.

    • DMS 213 IMMIGRATION & FILM

      staff :: M/W 9:00am – 10:50am :: CFA 232
      REG#24049

      By looking at representative examples of American and foreign films, this course will critically examine the role of cinema in the construction and exploration of the figure of the racial, ethnic, cultural and social theory. Our topics will include (1) racial, ethnic and cultural identity and its reciprocal relationship with cinema, (2) the notion of realism in relation to the representation of race and ethnicity in film, (3) the cinematic representation of inter-ethnic and intra-ethnic conflict, (4) the position of cinema in the debate between assimilation and multiculturalism. Films will be screened in class and discussed against the background of focused critical readings. The aim of the course is to provide you with an opportunity to develop your critical thinking and writing abilities through class discussions, close readings of films and critical literature, and writing assignments. The course fulfills the American Pluralism requirement.

      Fulfills the American Pluralism requirement or Media and Culture or Media Study Elective.

    • DMS 213 IMMIGRATION & FILM

      Granata,Yvette Marie :: TR 9:00AM – 10:50PM :: CFA 232
      reg#17525

      By looking at representative examples of American and foreign films, this course will critically examine the role of cinema in the construction and exploration of the figure of the racial, ethnic, cultural and social theory. Our topics will include (1) racial, ethnic and cultural identity and its reciprocal relationship with cinema, (2) the notion of realism in relation to the representation of race and ethnicity in film, (3) the cinematic representation of inter-ethnic and intra-ethnic conflict, (4) the position of cinema in the debate between assimilation and multiculturalism. Films will be screened in class and discussed against the background of focused critical readings. The aim of the course is to provide you with an opportunity to develop your critical thinking and writing abilities through class discussions, close readings of films and critical literature, and writing assignments.

      Fulfills the American Pluralism requirement or Media and Culture or Media Study Elective.

    • DMS 213 Immigration & Film

      Session M
      Feiner :: Online Course
      reg# 11803

      By looking at representative examples of American and foreign films, this course will critically examine the role of cinema in the construction and exploration of the figure of the racial, ethnic, cultural and social theory. Our topics will include (1) racial, ethnic and cultural identity and its reciprocal relationship with cinema, (2) the notion of realism in relation to the representation of race and ethnicity in film, (3) the cinematic representation of inter-ethnic and intra-ethnic conflict, (4) the position of cinema in the debate between assimilation and multiculturalism. Films will be screened in class and discussed against the background of focused critical readings. The aim of the course is to provide you with an opportunity to develop your critical thinking and writing abilities through class discussions, close readings of films and critical literature, and writing assignments. Fulfills the American Pluralism requirement or Media and Culture or Media Study Elective

    • DMS 213 Immigration & Film (online)

      Session J
      Waxman :: Online Course
      reg# 12152

      By looking at representative examples of American and foreign films, this course will critically examine the role of cinema in the construction and exploration of the figure of the racial, ethnic, cultural and social theory. Our topics will include (1) racial, ethnic and cultural identity and its reciprocal relationship with cinema, (2) the notion of realism in relation to the representation of race and ethnicity in film, (3) the cinematic representation of inter-ethnic and intra-ethnic conflict, (4) the position of cinema in the debate between assimilation and multiculturalism. Films will be screened in class and discussed against the background of focused critical readings. The aim of the course is to provide you with an opportunity to develop your critical thinking and writing abilities through class discussions, close readings of films and critical literature, and writing assignments. Fulfills the American Pluralism requirement or Media and Culture or Media Study Elective

    • DMS 213 Immigration and Film

      staff :: T/TH 9:00am – 10:50am :: CFA 232
      REG#15200

      By looking at representative examples of American and foreign films, this course will critically examine the role of cinema in the construction and exploration of the figure of the racial, ethnic, cultural and social theory. Our topics will include (1) racial, ethnic and cultural identity and its reciprocal relationship with cinema, (2) the notion of realism in relation to the representation of race and ethnicity in film, (3) the cinematic representation of inter-ethnic and intra-ethnic conflict, (4) the position of cinema in the debate between assimilation and multiculturalism. Films will be screened in class and discussed against the background of focused critical readings. The aim of the course is to provide you with an opportunity to develop your critical thinking and writing abilities through class discussions, close readings of films and critical literature, and writing assignments. The course fulfills the American Pluralism requirement.

      Fulfills the American Pluralism requirement or Media and Culture or Media Study Elective.

    • DMS 213 Immigration and Film

      staff :: We  4-7:50pm :: CFA 112
      REG#22312

      By looking at representative examples of American and foreign films, this course will critically examine the role of cinema in the construction and exploration of the figure of the racial, ethnic, cultural and social theory. Our topics will include (1) racial, ethnic and cultural identity and its reciprocal relationship with cinema, (2) the notion of realism in relation to the representation of race and ethnicity in film, (3) the cinematic representation of inter-ethnic and intra-ethnic conflict, (4) the position of cinema in the debate between assimilation and multiculturalism. Films will be screened in class and discussed against the background of focused critical readings. The aim of the course is to provide you with an opportunity to develop your critical thinking and writing abilities through class discussions, close readings of films and critical literature, and writing assignments.

       

    • DMS 213 J Immigration & Film (online)

      Session J
      Cintron :: Online
      reg# 12391

      By looking at representative examples of American and foreign films, this course will critically examine the role of cinema in the construction and exploration of the figure of the racial, ethnic, cultural and social theory. Our topics will include (1) racial, ethnic and cultural identity and its reciprocal relationship with cinema, (2) the notion of realism in relation to the representation of race and ethnicity in film, (3) the cinematic representation of inter-ethnic and intra-ethnic conflict, (4) the position of cinema in the debate between assimilation and multiculturalism. Films will be screened in class and discussed against the background of focused critical readings. The aim of the course is to provide you with an opportunity to develop your critical thinking and writing abilities through class discussions, close readings of films and critical literature, and writing assignments. Fulfills the American Pluralism requirement or Media and Culture or Media Study Elective.

    • DMS 213 M-on Immigration and Film (online)

      Session M
      staff :: Online Course
      reg# 11803

      By looking at representative examples of American and foreign films, this course will critically examine the role of cinema in the construction and exploration of the figure of the racial, ethnic, cultural and social theory. Our topics will include (1) racial, ethnic and cultural identity and its reciprocal relationship with cinema, (2) the notion of realism in relation to the representation of race and ethnicity in film, (3) the cinematic representation of inter-ethnic and intra-ethnic conflict, (4) the position of cinema in the debate between assimilation and multiculturalism. Films will be screened in class and discussed against the background of focused critical readings. The aim of the course is to provide you with an opportunity to develop your critical thinking and writing abilities through class discussions, close readings of films and critical literature, and writing assignments. Fulfills the American Pluralism requirement or Media and Culture or Media Study Elective

    • DMS 215 Creative Technology Workshop

      staff :: Friday, 9:00AM – 12:40PM :: CFA246
      REG#23468

      This course is divided into three five week modules: each module focuses on media and tech-based skills in a creative, collaborative, applications-based context. The three modules this semester are:
      * creative projection scenarios * – Projection technology is increasingly used in art installation, music performance, and theatrical design – experiment with image capture, manipulation and projection layered over physical artifacts.
      * wearable and ‘soft’ computing * – Use soft circuitry techniques (Lilypad Arduino, conductive paint, fabric, etc.) in the design and development of expressive and wearable projects. Focus on relationships between the body, technology, fashion, social interactions, and the environment.
      * Can you tell your story in 15 secs? Can you get it online in minutes keeping quality standards? How can your ideas become viral? – This module focuses on short-video sharing apps, mobile phone image capture, and fast/online editing for social networks and the web.

      Lab fee: $100

      This course will fulfill Intermediate Production or as an elective.

    • DMS 215 J Portfolio Production

      Session J
      Stadelmann :: M/W 1pm-4.40pm
      reg# 11126

      Are you a transfer student or a current UB student? Have you taken at least two basic production courses and intend to become a Media Study major in the Production concentration?

      If yes, then this course is designed for you!

      Learn how to present yourself and your work in an academic and professional context. Get prepared for the Fall 2013 Portfolio Review if you plan to enter the Media Study Department as a major. Learn how to apply to film festivals and shows.

      During this six week course we will look at portfolio examples of artists and filmmakers. Students will develop an artist statement, a presentation of their work online, and an understanding of the Media Study portfolio review process required of incoming majors.

      This course is geared towards incoming transfer and current UB students who have taken at least two basic production classes. Students who are eligible may submit to a portfolio review in the beginning of the Fall 2013 semester.

      There are still some seats available, so register soon to reserve your spot for this summer session class. $100 lab fee.

    • DMS 216 Creative Tech : Wearable Computing

      Geistweidt :: T/TH 1-2:50pm :: Crosby201
      Reg#22378

      This course serves as a hands-on introduction to the world of physical computing, a hybrid discipline wherein hardware, software, and networks combine to sense, respond, and interface with the physical world. In particular, this course focuses upon body-borne, or so-called wearable computers, digital devices, which via direct proximity to the human body, extend, enhance, amputate, otherwise augment the wearer’s experience. Weekly tutorials introduce participants to the basics of working with sensor, actuator, and micro-controller technologies, while formal assignments allow students to create freely within the context of thematic prompts. A mid-term presentation and a final project round out the deliverables for this module.

    • DMS 216 Creative Technology Workshop

      staff :: Friday, 1:00PM – 4:40PM :: CFA246
      REG#15296

      This course is divided into three five week modules: each module focuses on media and tech-based skills in a creative, collaborative, applications-based context. The three modules this semester are:
      * creative projection scenarios * – Projection technology is increasingly used in art installation, music performance, and theatrical design – experiment with image capture, manipulation and projection layered over physical artifacts.
      * wearable and ‘soft’ computing * – Use soft circuitry techniques (Lilypad Arduino, conductive paint, fabric, etc.) in the design and development of expressive and wearable projects. Focus on relationships between the body, technology, fashion, social interactions, and the environment.
      * Can you tell your story in 15 secs? Can you get it online in minutes keeping quality standards? How can your ideas become viral? – This module focuses on short-video sharing apps, mobile phone image capture, and fast/online editing for social networks and the web.

      Lab fee: $100

      This course will fulfill Intermediate Production or as an elective.

    • DMS 216 Intermediate Digital workshop: wearable computing

      staff :: T/TH 1:00PM – 2:50PM :: CFA 246
      REG#24241

      This course introduces basic concepts and techniques for creating objects, spaces and media that sense and respond to their physical surroundings and the actions and events that transpire there. Moving beyond the interface paradigm of screen, keyboard and mouse, physical computing enables alternate models for interaction with (and through) computers that afford more subtle and complex relations between a range of human and non-human actors.

      Fulfills Intermediate Production.

    • DMS 217 Creative Video Workshop: Observation and Place

      McCormick, Matt :: T 5:00 – 8:50 PM :: CFA235
      REG# 24249

      This class combines study of travelogue, landscape film, Neorealism, and Direct Cinema with creative exercises and projects to foster deeper perceptive-experiences. We will explore filmmaking as a disciplined way of seeing, of investigating environments, and expressing ideas. Through screenings, discussion, and filmmaking assignments, we will explore ideas of “thinking cinematically” and consider the differences between being a spectator and an observer. We will shed our preconceived notions of beauty and importance, focusing on opening our minds to our immediate environments and becoming more astute observers and creative documentarians.

      In this class we will study the work of artists such as Deborah Stratman, Edward Burtynsky, Lucien Castaing-Taylor and Ilisa Barbash, Jem Cohen, The Center of Land Use Interpretation, Naomi Uman, Bill Brown, the Maysles Brothers and more while also engaging in artistic exercises and projects. Students should have a handle on basic camera, sound, and editing operation, as this is a production course and students will be required to spend significant time outside of class producing short film/video assignments. Students should be prepared to work individually to create video and audio projects. $100 lab fee.

      Prerequisites: DMS 103 or DMS 105.

      . This course can count towards the “non- *” Intermediate Production course or as an elective.

    • DMS 217 Intermediate Editing

      Staff :: T/TH 1-2:50 :: CFA 278
      REG#23975

    • DMS 218 Creative Professional Practice

      Matt McCormick :: M/W 1-2:50 :: CFA 278
      REG#20133

      Whether producing independent features or documentaries, directing music videos, or creating advertising or web-content, understanding the behind the scenes process is imperative. “Creative Professional Practice” is a production course that explores the basic components of producing film and video at a professional level and prepares the student for the tumultuous life of a maker. The course introduces the concept of the “creative professional’ and explores the skills, both creative and organizational, one needs to be a successful filmmaker or artist in today’s landscape. We will pull back the curtain to reveal how directors pitch projects, how films are funded, and what steps must be taken for a project to get off the ground. The course will put equal emphasis on both the creative and organizational aspects of motion picture production- breaking down the jobs of both the director and producer, and explore the process of turning the seed of an idea into a completed film or video production. Throughout the course we will produce short video assignments, breakdown scripts and create budgets, learn to write effective treatments and proposals, explore the fund raising process, consider film-set protocol, discuss film festivals and distribution strategies, and engage in creative exercises. Students will work both independently and in groups, and should be
      prepared to spend significant time outside of class working on assignments. $100 lab fee.

      Prerequisites: Basic Video DMS 103 OR DMS 105 (required) and Intermediate Editing DMS
      217 (suggested)

      . This course can count towards the “non- *” Intermediate Production course or as an elective.

    • DMS 220 Machines, Codes and Cultures

      Bohlen :: T/TH 11am – 12:50pm  :: CFA112
      REG#24044

      This course will follow the history of machines and coding systems from the monastery bell to the latest humanoid robot; from the origins of numeric notation to protocols of cloud computing. This is not a history course, but an overview of concepts related to information technologies that substantially impact daily life. Consequently, the course will focus on cultural aspects of technologies and the myriad ways in which they are woven into the fabric of human activities, both in personal and public domains. Topics will include numbering systems, information and encoding, autonomous robots, interaction design, household smart appliances, the Internet of Things, software systems, social media and cloud computing. Students will introduced to these concepts through texts and guided through them in weekly discussions. Materials will be gathered from diverse authors and a variety of sources. Grades will be based on a mid-semester position paper, a multiple choice final exam as well as participation in class discussions. We will watch videos!

      Fulfills Basic Interpretation Requirement.

    • DMS 220 Machines, Codes and Cultures

      Bohlen :: M/W 3:00PM – 4:50PM :: CFA 112
      REG# 22661

      This course will follow the history of machines and coding systems from the monastery bell to the latest humanoid robot; from the origins of numeric notation to social media in select episodes. This is not a history course, but an overview of concepts related to information technologies that substantially impact daily life today. Consequently, the course will focus on cultural aspects of technologies and the myriad ways in which they are woven into the fabric of human activities. Topics will include the making of cities, numbering systems, agriculture, timekeeping and navigation, robots, interaction design, household appliances, software systems, social media and speculative design. Students will be introduced to these concepts through primary source materials (texts and videos) and guided through them in weekly discussions. Grades will be based on a mid-semester position paper, a multiple choice final exam as well as participation in class discussions and a voluntary extra credit assignment.  Open to all students!

      Fulfills Basic Theory and Intro to Interpretation or Media and Culture .

    • DMS 220 Machines, Codes and Cultures

      Bohlen :: MoWe 2:00PM-3:50PM :: CFA 112
      REG#20216

      This course will follow the history of machines and coding systems from the monastery bell to the latest humanoid robot; from the origins of numeric notation to social media in select episodes. This is not a history course, but an overview of concepts related to information technologies that substantially impact daily life today. Consequently, the course will focus on cultural aspects of technologies and the myriad ways in which they are woven into the fabric of human activities. Topics will include the making of cities, numbering systems, agriculture, timekeeping and navigation, robots, interaction design, household appliances, software systems, social media and speculative design. Students will be introduced to these concepts through primary source materials (texts and videos) and guided through them in weekly discussions. Grades will be based on a mid-semester position paper, a multiple choice final exam as well as participation in class discussions and a voluntary extra credit assignment. Open to all students!
Fulfills Basic Theory and Intro to Interpretation or Media and Culture .

    • DMS 221 Web Development

      staff :: MW, 1:00pm – 2:50pm :: CFA244
      REG#23673

      Web Development focuses on the design and production of web-based media. Topics will include: web development (HTML5, CSS3, JavaScript, JQuery) as well as the use of content management systems (WordPress, PHP). For students with basic, intermediate, or no coding experience.

      Lab Fee $125

      Fulfills Intermediate Production Requirement.

    • DMS 221 Web Development

      Clark :: M/W 11- 12:50PM :: CFA 244
      REG#23607

      Web Development focuses on the design and production of web-based media. Topics will include: web development (HTML5, CSS3, JavaScript, JQuery) as well as the use of content management systems (WordPress, PHP). For students with basic, intermediate, or no coding experience. Lab fee: $100

      Fulfills Intermediate Production Requirement.

    • DMS 221 Web Development

      staff :: MW 1:00 – 2:50AM :: CFA 244
      REG# 23673

      This is a course exploring the general topic of web applications – that is, using programming to create dynamic, interactive websites, or programming with web APIs, or similar subjects. It is intended to follow an “inquiry based” approach. This means that much of the direction of the course is up to you, the student. Following a bit of fundamentals (HTML and Javascript), students will be expected to decide what specific topics you want to examine in detail, and to take initiative on learning and doing things. I, the instructor, will be along to guide and assist where needed, but I don’t wish to simply follow a set course of lectures. Once things get going, class sessions will depend heavily on what you bring to them.

      Lab fee: $125

    • DMS 225 Digital Literature Survey

      Glazier :: M W , 4:00 PM – 5:50 PM :: Capen 108
      REG#24237

      DMS 225 Digital Literature Survey, Fall 2012, offers students the opportunity to conduct an intensive survey of the field of digital literature through a focus on literary, visual, and aural elements of language art in the media age. Primary emphasis will be on “reading” the digital texts presented. Course content includes the screening of digital texts, the reading of critical writing about the medium, film screenings, and presentation of other media related to contexts of meaning-making in the digital age. This course, invoking innovative poetry’s relation to digital media, extends media investigations to related issues in film, theory, the phenomenon of the Internet and its relation to “the I”, meaning-making through the context, design, and writerly qualities of Web pages, traditions of hypertext, the materiality of code, the history of e-poetry, and digital media poetry in the academy. For e-poetry, special attention will be given to understanding a broad range of innovative works in the medium including hypertext, digital and kinetic literature, interactive texts, and works in networked and programmable media, and to examining, interpreting, and interrogating the key theoretical texts of the most significant practitioners in the field. The course will include foundational early theory, writings from formative scholarly hypertext theorists, and work by more recent cutting-edge independent digital theorists. Attention will be given to the role of programming as a social, literary, and language-related act. For film and critical material, the course will investigate what changes in perception and art-marking are entered through science, technology, and “future” life. The cultural impact of films related to programming/cyberculture will be discussed, with regular film screenings constituting part of the course content. Discussion of key literary, cybercultural and media theory authors as relevant will occur, with special attention to crucial moments in contemporary poetry that have helped define and shape material approaches to innovative art practice. Online texts will be read as appropriate, especially for a sense of current research in the field. There are NO prerequisites for this class. WARNING: Films may contain subject matter of a sensitive or controversial nature. COURSE REQUIREMENTS: Weekly readings, oral presentations, a film journal, a final project, exams, and quizzes as necessary. Attendance is crucial. For Media Study majors, this course fulfills Advanced Analysis or Media Study Elective.

      Online works: Cayley, Rosenberg, Glazier, Memmott, Mencia, Mez, And, Upton, Damon. etc. Poetry: Zukofsky, Pound, Williams, Creeley, Stein, Eigner, Olson, H.D., etc. Music: Art Ensemble of Chicago, Elvin Jones, Henry Threadgill, Charles Mingus, Charlie Parker, Thelonious Monk, etc. Films. Possible screenings include: Tarkofsky, Marker, science films, early Twentieth century experimental cinema, Maya Deren, Lang, Resnais, Brakhage, Makavejev, the Dalai Lama, etc. Theoretical Works: Baudrillard, Derrida, Benjamin, Deleuze, Serres, Panofksy, etc. TEXT. Digital Poetics: the Making of E-Poetries (Loss Pequeño Glazier) at Talking Leaves Books.

    • DMS 231 3D Modeling

      Session J
      Baumgaertner :: CFA 242
      reg# 12039

      This course is designed to provide students with an understanding of how to make 3D models for “real time” programs like games and simulations. Students will utilize Autodesk Maya as well as Adobe Photoshop to make models and other assets from scratch for their own unique creations. The topics taught in this class include low polygon modeling, photography, texture creation, and material creation. Additional material will be taught using Turtle for texture baking and surface transferring. Enrolling students should come to the first class with a sketch pad (unlined) which can be purchased at the student bookstore. $100 lab fee. Fulfills non “*” intermediate production requirement or can be used as an elective.

    • DMS 231 Game and Animation Workshop

      staff :: T/TH 1-2:50pm :: CFA 242
      REG# 23674

      Increasingly we live, play, and work in virtual worlds created by computer graphics, 3D models, scripts and programs; places inhabited by networked people and autonomous computer characters. This production course focuses on 3D modeling and animation; virtual world building functions and scripting / programming in game engines.

      Lab fee is $125

      Fulfills Intermediate Production Requirement.

    • DMS 231 Game and Animation Workshop

      staff :: MoWe1:00PM-2:50PM:: CFA 242
      REG#20751

    • DMS 259 Intro to Media Analysis

      Session M
      James :: Online Course
      reg# 11802

      Provides students with a theoretical and historical grounding in analyzing the media and visual revolution of the 20th century. Encourages students to experiment with various media codes in their final exam projects in which they combine technical skills with analytical and critical thinking.

    • DMS 259 Intro To Media Analysis

      Sarlin, Paige H :: MW 3 – 4:50pm  :: CFA112
      REG#20612

      An introduction to the key forms that constitute media in modern culture: photography, film, recorded sound, print, television, video, and new media. This course will expose students to a range of critical accounts of different media – considering media as representational forms as well as aesthetic, social, and/or political practices.  We will examine both the material components that define various media and the historical and social functions that they serve.  Lectures, screenings, and discussions will be structured by major theoretical concepts and approaches drawn from the disciplines of film and media studies, critical theory, and cultural studies.  This course will provide a solid theoretical foundation for all forms of media study – including both production and analysis.

      Fulfills Basic Interpretation Requirement.

    • DMS 259 Intro to Media Analysis

      Sarlin :: MW 2pm- 3:50pm :: CFA112
      Reg#22377

    • DMS 259 Introduction to Media Analysis

      Sarlin, Paige :: MW 3-4pm :: CFA 112
      REG#24240

      Intro to Media Analysis is an introductory course to Media Analysis examines the rise of especially visual mass media in the 20 th century, from photography, television, and film, to new media. It pays close attention to media historical moments, such as fascism and film in post world war II Italy, or the postmodern turn with the event of digitality. Due to the urgency of political events, we will closely analyze the current media-war-coverage considering mainstream as well as independent media discourses. The respective media are analyzed in light of their materiality. Methodologies vary between Ideology-critique, Cultural Studies, Political Theory, Postmodern Theory, and Semiotics. Students will write essay exams based on course lectures and essays from the course reader.

      Fulfills Basic Theory and Intro to Interpretation.

    • DMS 259 MEDIA ANALYSIS

      James :: MW 9:00am-10:50am :: CFA 112
      REG#17625
      is introductory course to Media Analysis examines the rise of especially visual mass media in the 20 th century, from photography, television, and film, to new media. It pays close attention to media historical moments, such as fascism and film in post world war II Italy, or the postmodern turn with the event of digitality. Due to the urgency of political events, we will closely analyze the current media-war-coverage considering mainstream as well as independent media discourses. The respective media are analyzed in light of their materiality. Methodologies vary between Ideology-critique, Cultural Studies, Political Theory, Postmodern Theory, and Semiotics. Students will write essay exams based on course lectures and essays from the course reader. Fulfills Intro to Interpretation.

    • DMS 315 3D Modeling

      Khilji :: MW 2-3:50pm :: CFA242
      Reg# 23920

      This course is designed to provide students with a basic approach to 3d modeling using Maya. Students will create many different models throughout the semester and learn the fundamentals of modeling with polygons and nurbs, as well as how to create simple animations and set up cameras and lighting. Some Photoshop work will be required to create textures. $100 lab fee. Fulfills non “*” intermediate production requirement or can be used as an elective.

    • DMS 315 Hacking Social Media

      Curry, Derek Charles :: T/TH , 1pm – 2:50pm :: CFA244
      REG#23615 

      Recent developments in social media provide a wealth of data and opportunities for new ways of interacting that had previously not existed.  Social media shapes the way people interact with each other and is a fertile, but under-explored space for artists to experiment.  In this production class, we examine the various uses of, and ways of interacting with, social media.  Student projects will interface with social media using the APIs provided by sites such as Facebook and Twitter, and experiment with alternative modes of interacting and data mining.  The first project of the course will be a Twitter bot that will make automatic queries and posts to Twitter when prompted by either an automated search or another user’s post.  Subsequent projects will explore the use of web-crawlers, the use of data from Facebook, the DIY programming of Facebook apps, creative data visualization, and the use of sensors or QR codes to add physical interaction. Familiarity with social media interfaces is not necessary, but students should have some prior experience with programming. Lab fee is $100.

      Fulfills Intermediate Production Requirement.

    • DMS 315 Intermediate Documentary

      Lee, Carl :: T/Th 3 – 4:50pm  :: CFA286
      REG#24076

       

      Lab Fee is $125

      Fulfills Intermediate Production Requirement.

    • DMS 315 Intermediate Documentary

      Lee, Carl :: Th 1:00PM – 4:40PM :: CFA 286
      REG#24242

      Intermediate Documentary Production is an undergraduate course that will further develop students’ video and audio production and post-production skills through hands-on exploration of non-fiction filmmaking. Students will work on a series of short exercise assignments with a focus on observational shooting, a collaborative in-class project, and a final project. Topics to be covered include: modes of documentary; non-fiction story-telling; observational/verité shooting and audio recording techniques; the interview (approaches, set-up, lighting); lighting for documentary; video technology; image and sound editing; preparing video for online distribution, and additional topics to be decided. Regular screenings of non-fiction work will take place. Students must have taken and passed Basic Video (DMS103) or Basic Documentary (DMS105) or equivalent, or have permission of the instructor to take this class. A lab fee of $125 is assessed for this course.

      Fulfills Intermediate Production.

    • DMS 315 Intermediate Documentary

      Lee :: Th 1-4:40pm :: CFA286
      Reg#22379

      This is an undergraduate-level course that will further develop students’ video and audio production and post-production skills through hands-on exploration of documentary and non-fiction filmmaking. Students will work on a series of short exercise assignments, collaborative, service-learning projects, and a final project. Topics to be covered include: modes of documentary; non-fiction story-telling; observational/verité shooting and audio recording techniques; the interview (approaches, set-up, lighting); lighting for documentary; video technology; image and sound editing; preparing video for online distribution, and additional topics to be decided. Regular screenings of non-fiction work will take place. Students must have taken and passed Basic Video (DMS103) or Basic Documentary (DMS105) or equivalent, or have permission of the instructor to take this class.  A lab fee of $125 is assessed for this course.

    • DMS 315 Web Programming

      Pape, D.E. :: TR 9:00AM – 10:50AM :: CFA 244
      REG#24251

      Introduction to web-based script programming. Course will examine the scripting and database tools that are used to create modern, dynamic web sites. Students will learn to use open source systems such as PHP, MySQL, and Apache. Other topics will include client-side scripting (AJAX) and application development with current “Web 2.0” sites such as Google Maps, Flickr, or Facebook. Students are expected to have background experience in either programming or web design (HTML, CSS, etc).
      Lab fee is $100

    • DMS 316 Community Based Art

      Curry,Laura E :: Online
      REG#23606 

      This is an intermediate production class for those who would like to use video, audio, performance, object, direct engagement, etc. for projects grounded and framed in community collaborations.

      Students will produce a series of approximately 4 small projects paying attention to the social, political, and cultural contexts that frame their everyday life, and which will act as the groundwork for their final project, and project proposal.

      The first few projects will focus on site research as the student develops relationships and/or ideas with community groups, specific sites, or other community entities.

      The students are required to work in teams and are encouraged to remain open to unexpected tools and mediums of expression that best frame their community based art project.

      The expectation is that the students will have knowledge of any technology they wish to use. The instructor encourages an open class dialogue via the class website where ideas, knowledge, project documentation, and technology tips are freely shared as part of the class process.

      Because this is an on-line class, the instructor will use the Internet to bring the students “with” her during a month long residency in Mexico to begin the semester in January. The instructor will meet with students, in person at their project site(s) in Buffalo NY beginning in March, at mutually agreeable times arranged by the students and the instructor.

      “Education for Socially Engaged Art: A Materials and Techniques Handbook” by Pablo Helguera is the required text. Other reading material will be provided in pdf via the course website.

      The class will meet twice weekly online: Tuesday and Thursday from 1:00pm to 2:00pm EST as video chat or text chat sessions.

    • DMS 316 Earth Wind Fire Water & Other Media

      Sargent,Paul Lloyd :: T R , 3:00 – 4:50 PM :: CFA232
      REG# 24070

      Western New York’s built environment is constructed atop a complex ecosystem of “first nature” topography and hydrology comprised of lakes, rivers, marshes, forests, fields, and other features. While environmental conditions of the landscape inform the development of cultures, economies, and societies within the region, in this age that many in the sciences and humanities are calling the Anthropocene, so, too, have socio-cultural and economic factors shaped this now-mediated ecology: channelized rivers converge within polluted bays and harbors to outflow into the Great Lakes, whose shorelines are crisscrossed by train tracks, highways, power lines, fiber optic cables, wastewater systems, smokestacks, runways, canals, and more, forming layer upon layer of interwoven media networks.

      This intermediate-level, research-led production class in media ecology will focus on theories, experiments, and projects emerging from an array of disciplines, philosophies, and practices to critically investigate and respond to such media ecologies as resource extraction, production, and consumption networks, waste systems, communications technology infrastructures, “black box” social and infrastructural engineering systems, waterway management, etc, through the production of site- and/or place-specific media experimentation. Buttressing our selection of readings from media theory, media archeology, [urban] political ecology, and cultural geography, students will investigate new and emerging art, engineering, and design practices by utilizing a selection of devices and technologies, from digital imaging machines, cell phone-based GPS applications, data visualization software, and more through the production of short projects and assignments, as well as a formal, semester-long final project in the medium of their choosing.

      This course will fulfill Media and Culture requirement.

    • DMS 331 Social & Mobile Media

      Sack :: T/TH 11am – 12:50pm :: CFA244
      Reg#22380

    • DMS 331 Social and Mobile Media

      staff :: T/TH 3 – 4:50pm  :: CFA244
      REG#24045

      This course is an investigation into mobile and social networks. It will take a bottom-up approach, initially focusing on the infrastructure of mobile networks and the development of online social networks historically. Students will learn to identify network infrastructure in the built environment and will gain hands-on experience with historically significant and alternative forms of online communication.

      This knowledge of our place in history and the basic functioning of networks will stand us in good stead to analyze modern social networks. The class will survey mobile and online culture on a global scale across a variety of platforms, including notable artworks that engage with the topic.

      Students will learn the basics of creating a mobile apps using PhoneGap. Assessment will be based on the completion of two intermediary projects and one final project that may take the form of an app, an online performance, experiment, or other artwork that engages with the social or mobile network. As an intermediate class, students are expected to have had prior experience with scripting or programming (e.g. javascript, python, processing) though absolute expertise is not required. The course would be an ideal complement to courses such as DMS480 Social and Media Networks and DMS417 Media Geographies, for students interested in an ‘under the hood’ look at networked media.

      Lab fee: $125

      Fulfills Intermediate Production Requirement.

    • DMS 333 World Cinema

      Shilina-Conte,Tatiana :: Th 5 – 8:40pm  :: CFA112
      REG#24047

      “World cinema” can no longer be reduced to the category of individual national cinemas, eroded by the oppositional formula “the West and the Rest.” David Martin-Jones suggests approaching “world cinemas” in the plural mode “as an interconnected multiplicity (forest) rather than a collection of autonomous sovereign nation-states (trees).” To use the metaphor of the GPS navigation device, this class will engage in remapping and recalculating the alternative routes of world cinema. Creating this new cartography will require different models of reconceptualization.

      One such concept is “Minor Cinema,” proposed by Gilles Deleuze, which will serve as the cornerstone for this class. On the one hand, we will look at minor cinema as a vehicle of experimentation that goes against dominant practices and mainstream currents, pushing the limits of cinematic language to open new horizons. On the other hand, we will engage with minor cinema as political cinema, created by or for minority figures. Mikhail Bakhtin once stated that “in culture, exotopy is the most powerful tool for understanding.” The look from the outside invites “becoming-minor,” in order to entertain and celebrate difference, not sameness. Approached from both angles, minor cinema intersects with cinema of small or unrecognized nations, women’s cinema, queer cinema, indigenous cinema, black cinema, amateur cinema, remix culture, etc. In addition, we will explore a range of other competing terms at the intersection of global culture, transnationalism, information age and activist cinema. These will include “Third Cinema” (Solanas & Octavio), “Intercultural Cinema” (Marks), “Accented Cinema” (Naficy), “Peripheral Cinema” (Iordanova), “Nomadic Cinema” ( Andrew), as well as postcolonial, hybrid, marginal, militant, interstitial and diasporic cinema.

      The films chosen for this class will explore alternative means of representation, such as fragmentation, coding, silence and absence, both as a means of experimentation with the cinematic language and a tool of political protest and resistance. The films will range between “Divine Intervention” by Elia Suleiman (Palestine), “La Antena” by Esteban Sapir (Argentina), “The Missing Picture” by Rithy Panh (Cambodia), “Rebirth of a Nation” by DJ Spooky and “Citizenfour” by Laura Poitras (US). Critical texts and films will help us to understand our present existence in a world marked by the unprecedented flows of information, as well as the social, (geo)political and cultural forces that shape our ways of inhabiting it. Rachel Falconer describes a person who is critically attuned to these new challenges of globalized networked culture as a “DJ of Thought.” This class invites you to become a DJ of Thought.

      Fulfills Media & Culture OR Advanced Analysis Requirement.

    • DMS 333 World Cinema

      Shilina-Conte :: TH 5:00PM – 8:40PM :: CFA 112
      REG# 22664

      “World cinema” can no longer be reduced to the category of individual national cinemas, eroded by the oppositional formula “the West and the Rest.” David Martin-Jones suggests approaching “world cinemas” in the plural mode “as an interconnected multiplicity (forest) rather than a collection of autonomous sovereign nation-states (trees).” To use the metaphor of the GPS navigation device, this class will engage in remapping and recalculating the alternative routes of world cinema. Creating this new cartography will require different models of reconceptualization.

      One such concept is “Minor Cinema,” proposed by Gilles Deleuze, which will serve as the cornerstone for this class. On the one hand, we will look at minor cinema as a vehicle of experimentation that goes against dominant practices and mainstream currents, pushing the limits of cinematic language to open new horizons. On the other hand, we will engage with minor cinema as political cinema, created by or for minority figures. Mikhail Bakhtin once stated that “in culture, exotopy is the most powerful tool for understanding.” The look from the outside invites “becoming-minor,” in order to entertain and celebrate difference, not sameness. Approached from both angles, minor cinema intersects with cinema of small or unrecognized nations, women’s cinema, queer cinema, indigenous cinema, black cinema, amateur cinema, remix culture, etc. In addition, we will explore a range of other competing terms at the intersection of global culture, transnationalism, information age and activist cinema. These will include “Third Cinema” (Solanas & Octavio), “Intercultural Cinema” (Marks), “Accented Cinema” (Naficy), “Peripheral Cinema” (Iordanova), “Nomadic Cinema” ( Andrew), as well as postcolonial, hybrid, marginal, militant, interstitial and diasporic cinema.

      The films chosen for this class will explore alternative means of representation, such as fragmentation, coding, silence and absence, both as a means of experimentation with the cinematic language and a tool of political protest and resistance. The films will range between “Divine Intervention” by Elia Suleiman (Palestine), “La Antena” by Esteban Sapir (Argentina), “The Missing Picture” by Rithy Panh (Cambodia), “Rebirth of a Nation” by DJ Spooky and “Citizenfour” by Laura Poitras (US). Critical texts and films will help us to understand our present existence in a world marked by the unprecedented flows of information, as well as the social, (geo)political and cultural forces that shape our ways of inhabiting it. Rachel Falconer describes a person who is critically attuned to these new challenges of globalized networked culture as a “DJ of Thought.” This class invites you to become a DJ of Thought.

      Fulfills Media & Culture OR Advanced Theory Requirement.

    • DMS 333 World Cinema

      Rhee :: Tu 4:00PM-6:40PM :: CFA 112
      REG#20217

    • DMS 341 Intermediate Video Wkshp

      staff :: Fr 1:00PM-4:50PM :: CFA286
      REG#20752

      Prereqs: DMS 103 or 105 or 199s

      This hybrid production/theory course will explore concepts taken from various sources, from ‘traditional film’ to sub-genres of ‘experimental film’, media and video art, among others. In class we will screen and discuss works, styles, and techniques that will enable students to analyze how technique has been applied with proficiency. Through a series of different short exercises, students will develop and improve technical knowledge, as their creativity will be challenged to connect ideas with skills. By exploring diverse usages of cameras, microphones, lights, grips and supports, new shooting techniques will be applied in particular production circumstances. The goal is to heighten the students’ aesthetic criteria in the application of technique for environments of media production. Accordingly the students will create a short final project as a conclusion of the semester. This is an intermediate level production course – students should have a basic understanding of camera, sound, and editing tools and be prepared to work both independently and in groups. Lab fee: $125

      Fulfills * Intermediate Production requirement.

    • DMS 343 Digital Post Production

      Staff :: M/W, 11am – 12:50pm :: CFA244
      REG#23912

      Fulfills * Intermediate Production requirement.

    • DMS 343 Digital Post Production

      staff :: T/TH 3:00pm – 4:50pm :: CFA 244
      REG#24051

      Post-production processes go beyond the great celebration of effects. Generally is thought to give sense to visual and sound signs that allows audiences to go beyond perception, making media more powerful and meeting high standards for cinema, television and new media. When discussing the development of a time based digital piece, it must be clear that there is a schematic and organized process that let experts shape media according to predetermined ideas and concepts.
      This class will allow the students to use a variety of tools that shape digital media in a boarder sense, with the goal to potentiate a concept and with the perspective of experimenting with workflows, processes, standards and techniques in digital media post production.

      Lab fee is $125.

      Fulfills Intermediate Production Requirement.

    • DMS 343 Digital Post Production

      Waham, Sama :: MW 3-4:50 :: CFA 244
      REG# 22488

      Post-production processes go beyond the great celebration of effects. Generally is thought to give sense to visual and sound signs that allows audiences to go beyond perception, making media more powerful and meeting high standards for cinema, television and new media. When discussing the development of a time based digital piece, it must be clear that there is a schematic and organized process that let experts shape media according to predetermined ideas and concepts.
      This class will allow the students to use a variety of tools that shape digital media in a boarder sense, with the goal to potentiate a concept and with the perspective of experimenting with workflows, processes, standards and techniques in digital media post production.Lab fee is $125.

      Fulfills Intermediate Production.

    • DMS 343 Digital Post Production

      staff :: M/W 3-4:50pm :: CFA244
      Reg#21013

      Post-production processes go beyond the great celebration of effects. Generally is thought to give sense to visual and sound signs that allows audiences to go beyond perception, making media more powerful and meeting high standards for cinema, television and new media. When discussing the development of a time based digital piece, it must be clear that there is a schematic and organized process that let experts shape media according to predetermined ideas and concepts.
      This class will allow the students to use a variety of tools that shape digital media in a boarder sense, with the goal to potentiate a concept and with the perspective of experimenting with workflows, processes, standards and techniques in digital media post production.Lab fee is $125.

      Fulfills Intermediate Production..

    • DMS 375 Science, Culture & Media

      Nickard,Gary L. :: M/W 3:15- 4:35pm :: Clemen 107
      REG#15982

      Science Culture and Media: Introduces critical issues in science, culture, and emerging media-especially as they pertain to contemporary artistic practice. Topics are addressed through artists’ works; selected readings include historical trends, biotechnology, virtuality, net theory, and cultural resistance.

      This course will fulfill Media and Culture requirement.

    • DMS 388 Screenwriting

      staff :: T/TH 9:00 – 10:50AM :: CFA 232
      REG# 23676

      In this production workshop students will concentrate on writing and editing text/script elements for their media projects. The course will explore both traditional and experimental methods for generating and structuring text for fictional and documentary work. Texts may include original writing, interview material, collaged or found fragments, that will be performed, heard or displayed in the final piece. The texts may be linear, non-linear, interactive, poetic…

      Lab fee: $125.
      Fulfills Advanced Production.

    • DMS 401 Advanced Cinematography

      Lee
      Reg# 12514

      T/TH 1-4:40, Session I, May 21-June 29
      This advanced-level class will focus on further developing visual approaches to moving image production in digital video and 16mm. Composition and lighting concepts will be emphasized through lectures and discussions, in-class exercises, weekly assignments, and a final project. Students must have successfully completed an intermediate-level production class and Basic Film. Lab fee: $100

    • DMS 404 Advanced Documentary Prod

      Elder,Sarah M :: T/TH 3-4:50pm :: CFA 235
      REG#23613

      This course is an advanced workshop in which students create an original documentary project in video (or film, still photography, audio or web-based formats with the permission of instructor). Creativity and originality will be stressed with exercises to encourage “seeing”, “listening” and artistic risk taking. Individual projects may go in many creative directions including the political, personal, humorous, experimental, conventional, transgressive, ethnographic, client-based or activist. Students will gain a solid understanding of contemporary non-fiction forms and the particular problems which non-fiction makers face. Films by contemporary artists will be shown on a regular basis with special attention to experimental documentary work. We will look at dramatic structure, story telling, and narrative/non-narrative forms of editing. Emphasis will be given to production techniques which bring access and intimacy to the video subject and integrity to the documentary. The course will explore ethical issues and problems of privacy and intrusion. Students will develop production skills in research, fieldwork, collaboration, interviewing, location sound recording, camera skills, and production management. Each student will produce one short documentary piece, with supporting assignments in shooting, sound, and digital editing on the Media 100. A written production book will be required. A class film festival ends the semester. Prerequisite: DMS Basic Documentary, or DMS Basic Video and DMS Intermediate Video. Lab fee: $100. Attendance is mandatory.

      Lab fee: $100

      Fulfills Advanced Production.

    • DMS 404 Advanced Documentary Production

      Elder :: T/TH 11am-12:50pm :: CFA 235
      REG#22047

       

      This course is an advanced workshop in which students create an original documentary project in video (or film, still photography, audio or web-based formats with the permission of instructor). Creativity and originality will be stressed with exercises to encourage “seeing”, “listening” and artistic risk taking. Individual projects may go in many creative directions including the political, personal, humorous, experimental, conventional, transgressive, ethnographic, client-based or activist. Students will gain a solid understanding of contemporary non-fiction forms and the particular problems which non-fiction makers face. Films by contemporary artists will be shown on a regular basis with special attention to experimental documentary work. We will look at dramatic structure, story telling, and narrative/non-narrative forms of editing. Emphasis will be given to production techniques which bring access and intimacy to the video subject and integrity to the documentary. The course will explore ethical issues and problems of privacy and intrusion. Students will develop production skills in research, fieldwork, collaboration, interviewing, location sound recording, camera skills, and production management. Each student will produce one short documentary piece, with supporting assignments in shooting, sound, and digital editing on the Media 100. A written production book will be required. A class film festival ends the semester. Prerequisite: DMS Basic Documentary, or DMS Basic Video and DMS Intermediate Video.  Attendance is mandatory.

       

      Lab fee $125

      Fulfills Advanced Production

    • DMS 404 Advanced Documentary Production

      Elder :: TuTh 11:00AM-12:50PM :: CFA235
      REG#22313

      This course is an advanced workshop in which students create an original documentary project in video (or film, still photography, audio or web-based formats with the permission of instructor). Creativity and originality will be stressed with exercises to encourage “seeing”, “listening” and artistic risk taking. Individual projects may go in many creative directions including the political, personal, humorous, experimental, conventional, transgressive, ethnographic, client-based or activist. Students will gain a solid understanding of contemporary non-fiction forms and the particular problems which non-fiction makers face. Films by contemporary artists will be shown on a regular basis with special attention to experimental documentary work. We will look at dramatic structure, story telling, and narrative/non-narrative forms of editing. Emphasis will be given to production techniques which bring access and intimacy to the video subject and integrity to the documentary. The course will explore ethical issues and problems of privacy and intrusion. Students will develop production skills in research, fieldwork, collaboration, interviewing, location sound recording, camera skills, and production management. Each student will produce one short documentary piece, with supporting assignments in shooting, sound, and digital editing on the Media 100. A written production book will be required. A class film festival ends the semester. Prerequisite: DMS Basic Documentary, or DMS Basic Video and DMS Intermediate Video. Attendance is mandatory.
 Lab fee $125
Fulfills Advanced Production

    • DMS 410 Non Fiction Film

      Elder :: T 11am- 2:50pm :: CFA235
      Reg#22382

      This course looks at extraordinary works of Documentary Film from its early raw explorations to its current resurgence in the popular imagination. (No boring documentaries will be seen in this class.) The course explores documentary styles including experimental docs, cinema verite, ‘fake docs’ and cutting edge contemporary work such as interactive docs, networked docs and hybrid genres. Particular focus is on the curious relationship between images of reality and reality itself, and on America’s fascination with reality media. Emphasis is placed on the shifting line between fiction and non-fiction, and misguided notions of documentary “truth”. We also address the ethical and artistic considerations of filming real people and real communities.

      Students learn nonfiction critical theory and analyze filmic elements including visual narrativity, storytelling, camera work and editing strategies. Shot by shot, students learn how to identify the construction of each film – form, content, image, audio, and location methods. The course explores award-winning contemporary films with representations of gender issues, ethnicity, popular music, sexual orientation, murder, history, racism, climate change, landscape and love – in works of Wiseman, Maysles, Varda, Friedrich, Riggs, Morris, Oppenheimer, Jerecki, Herzog and others. Spanning more than a century, documentary film has had a far greater influence on narrative cinema than most people realize. Students develop analytical and interpretive media skills applicable to all visual media. Weekly film screenings, class discussion and reading assignments. Attendance is required as well as two papers and a take-home exam. Be prepared to see some exceptional films

       

      <span style=”color: red;”>Fulfills Global and Thematic Pathways, Advanced Analysis, Advanced Theory, and Media and Culture requirements</span>

    • DMS 410 Nonfiction Film

      Elder, Sarah :: T 11am – 2:40pm :: CFA 235
      REG# 24245

      This course looks at extraordinary works of Documentary Film from its early raw explorations to its current resurgence in the popular imagination. (No boring documentaries will be seen in this class.) The course explores documentary styles including experimental docs, cinema verite, ‘fake docs’ and cutting edge contemporary work such as interactive docs, networked docs and hybrid genres. Particular focus is on the curious relationship between images of reality and reality itself, and on America’s fascination with reality media. Emphasis is placed on the shifting line between fiction and non-fiction, and misguided notions of documentary “truth”. We also address the ethical and artistic considerations of filming real people and real communities.

      Students learn nonfiction critical theory and analyze filmic elements including visual narrativity, storytelling, camera work and editing strategies. Shot by shot, students learn how to identify the construction of each film – form, content, image, audio, and location methods. The course explores award-winning contemporary films with representations of gender issues, ethnicity, popular music, sexual orientation, murder, history, racism, climate change, landscape and love – in works of Wiseman, Maysles, Varda, Friedrich, Riggs, Morris, Oppenheimer, Jerecki, Herzog and others. Spanning more than a century, documentary film has had a far greater influence on narrative cinema than most people realize. Students develop analytical and interpretive media skills applicable to all visual media. Weekly film screenings, class discussion and reading assignments. Attendance is required as well as two papers and a take-home exam. Be prepared to see some exceptional films

      Fulfills Global and Thematic Pathways, Advanced Analysis, Advanced Theory, and Media and Culture requirements

    • DMS 411 Film and Media Theory

      Shilina-Conte :: MW 9:00 – 10:50AM :: CFA 286
      REG# 19824
      This course will guide you through the maze of “pre-” and “post-,” “-isms” and “-ships” in film studies.  We’ll examine theories of realism, formalism, semiotics, psychoanalysis, feminism, structuralism, post-structuralism and cognitive criticism with a particular emphasis on the sensory dimension of the moving image.  Assigned readings for the course will include selections from the writings of Bazin, Eisenstein, Baudry, Metz, Balasz, Gunning, Arnheim, Mulvey, Bordwell, Deleuze, Marks, Sobchack and Shaviro, among others. Following Thomas Elsaesser’s approach to film theory through the senses, and focusing on the role of the spectator in cinema, we will study classical and contemporary film paradigms through the interaction between Moving Image and Senses, Body and Mind, emphasizing such metaphors of filmic experience as Window and Frame, Door and Screen, Mirror and Face. Watching such films as Peeping Tom by Powell, Repulsion by Polanski, Persona by Bergman, Stalker by Tarkovsky, The Hand by Wong Kar Wai, we will not only interpret the way we “see” and “hear” films but also explore them through our senses of touch, smell and even taste. As Elsaesser points out, “film and spectator are like parasite and host, each occupying the other and being in turn occupied.” This unique approach to the confrontation and conflation of mind and body with the screen will open for us new models for knowing and representing the world through film and media.
      Fulfills Advanced Analysis OR Advanced Theory.

    • DMS 411 Film and Media Theory

      staff :: TuTh 11:00AM-12:50PM :: CFA232
      REG#22346

      As an introductory study of film theory, this course is designed to offer you an in-depth foundation of the field through the examination of a range of historically significant critical methods developed by film scholars for the study and analysis of film. Our goal in this class will be to understand the arguments at stake and to create our own dialogue with these theories as we consider their impact on both film viewers and filmmakers. To do this, we will consider methods of analysis ranging from apparatus theory and theories of spectatorship to auteur and genre theory. Because this class is entitled “Film and Media Theory,” we will also survey approaches to studying, viewing and analyzing a selection of non-filmic media texts including gallery-based “other cinema,” immersive media, video art and Web-based media forms. We will consider how new forms of spectatorship such as binge-watching and the optical, haptic and spatial aspects of VR impact and shift our viewing experience.
Fulfills Advanced Analysis OR Advanced Theory.

    • DMS 413 Filmic Text: Color & Moving Image

      Shilina-Conte,Tatiana :: Th 4-740pm :: CFA112
      REG#24091

      A feast for the eyes, this class will take you on an “over the rainbow tour” of color history and effects in cinema. “There never was a silent film,” Irving Thalberg famously declared, and just as with sound, color has accompanied cinema since its inception. Early filmmakers employed applied processes such as hand-painting, stenciling, tinting and toning, long before the advent of such photographic systems as Technicolor and Eastmancolor. After a brief overview of the history of cinematic color, we will concentrate on its expressive and affective use as a means of evoking atmosphere, establishing mood and conveying implicit messages. We will examine color palettes of various directors, comparing Tom Tykwer’s saturated and succulent reds and yellows with Andrey Tarkovsky’s subdued and subtle greens and browns. We will also discuss the concept of synesthesia and color’s ability to create cross-communication among the senses through visual outbursts of emotion. The discourse of color has become a widely addressed topic in the post-cinematic age, as it raises questions of the preservation and restoration of moving images, changing notions of archiving, and the introduction of new digital effects. Films and excerpts will include a number of early shorts, The Adventures of Prince Achmed, Flowers and Trees, Becky Sharp, Ivan the Terrible, The Red Balloon, Kwaidan, Shadows of Forgotten Ancestors, Trois Couleurs, Cyclo, 20 Fingers, and The Fall, among others.

      This course will fulfill advanced analysis.

    • DMS 413 Filmic text: Color and Moving Image

      staff :: T 5 – 8:40pm :: CFA 112
      REG# 22526

      How are texts shaped to makes sense of experience? More specifically, how are cinematic stories built to make sense of the world? How does film help us understand our experiences? These are a few of the questions we will consider in this class, which explores how film narratives are developed through a myriad of cinematic languages, from mise en scène to sound to editing. Exploring these detailed structures of the filmic text will encourage us to think about how film uniquely captures the experience of time, one of the fundamental elements of narrative. These inquiries will take us through a range of works from Wong Kar-wai’s disjointed meditations on modernity and alienation to the more conventional narrative structures of Hollywood.

      Fulfills Advanced Analysis, Advanced Theory.

    • DMS 414 Film Narrative

      Colleran :: T 4pm-740pm :: CFA112
      Reg#23523

      This course will examine theories of narrative structure and discuss the potential of film language, particularly editing, to create meaning through different narrative forms. We will compare the structure of films by early innovators such as D. W. Griffith and Sergei Eisenstein, look at a range of realist and formalist theories, and explore avant-garde works that pose critical challenges to the codes created by more classical narrative modes.

    • DMS 414 Film Narrative: Cinema in the Post-Media Age

      Shilina-Conte,Tatiana :: T 5 – 8:40pm :: CFA112
      REG#24053

      “Cinema Is Dead, Long Live Cinema,” Peter Greenaway recently declared. This class will examine a “moving” target, focusing on the current ontology of cinema as it attempts to redefine its status in a “multi-sensory milieu” (Rancière) of digital technologies and emerging media.

      As cinema has been uprooted from its former habitat and is being transplanted into the new media ecosystem, will it wither away as an alien species or become acclimatized and blossom in an unprecedented way?  The post-cinematic phenomenon already resembles the explosion of a supernova, ranging from definitions of cinema as an “incredibly shrinking medium” (Rodowick) to a “chameleon-like inter-medium” (Petho) and embracing such distribution platforms as the mini-displays of personal mobile devices and gigantic public IMAX screens.

      In this class we will become witnesses to cinema’s death(s) and reincarnation(s), as we watch its shape-shifting process from the analog to the digital body. We will probe a host of symptoms, including decomposition, fading, flammability of the film stock, and CGI, digital remastering, and 3-D modeling that affect the digital cinematic tissue. We will touch upon such topics as database cinema, soft cinema, multiplex cinema, cinema of attractions and cinema of effects (spectacular cinema), cinema and surveillance, post-media aesthetics, new film history and media archaeology and preservation of moving images.  We will consider the aesthetic, cultural, and social repercussions promoted by the global media convergence, which entails cardinal shifts in the patterns of production, reception and distribution of cinematic images.

      As is the case with all transitional periods, a set of questions arises:  Does cinema equal technology and should be understood in the strict sense of medium specificity, or should we adopt a broader approach to cinema as a form of “world viewing” (Cavell)?  Has film in fact been purely organic and asymptomatic in its indexical status as many theoreticians seem to claim?  Is the cinematic metamorphosis voluntary or forced?  Is this transplantation merely an occurrence of cultural nostalgia?  Will it diminish or increase the media biodiversity?  What kind of new cinematic genres will evolve as the result of this transplantation?  Does cinema live in a “digital dark age” (Usai) or will the digital divide signal the arrival of a “brave new world” for cinema?

      These questions lead to the pressing demand for a new film history and theory (Elsaesser) that will substantially modify, if not supplant the methodological apparatus of classical film theory.  This class will explore the foundations of this new film theory, scrutinizing writings by Manovich, Elsaesser, Shaviro, Sobchack, Jenkins, Krauss, Siegert, Rancière, Rodovick, Naficy, etc.  Works by Michael Haneke, Chris Marker, Jean-Luc Godard, Elia Suleiman, Esteban Sapir, Ettore Scola, Mike Figgis, Ari Folman, Chan-wook Park, Guy Maddin, Peter Greenaway, Alexander Sokurov, Apichatpong Weerasethakul and others will be considered as media examples.

      To sum up, the major agenda of this class will be to arrive at a dynamic definition of cinema in the thriving environment of digital diversity by analyzing the glo(c)al energy flows and processes that govern today’s media ecosystem. Perhaps, together with Niels Niessen, we will come to the realization that “the declaration of cinema’s death arrives prematurely.”

      This course will fulfill advanced analysis.

    • DMS 415

      Lee :: F 12:00 PM – 4:00 PM :: CFA 278
      REG#11945

      This is a media production course open to undergraduate
      students who have successfully completed a basic-level film production course and solidly grasp the fundamentals of 16mm film production. This course will build upon the basics of film production with an emphasis on: alternative and experimental methods of 16mm production (hand-processing, camera-less film techniques, in-camera special effects, etc.); use of motorized synch-sound film cameras; and the notion of “expanded cinema” in film and video presentation. Short exercises will be assigned in addition to a substantive final project. Hands-on production will be supported with praxis- and theory-based readings and screenings of contemporary and historical work. Note:
      Emulsion-based film processes can be expensive, so students should expect to spend $250-$400 in additional costs for materials and processing for the course. Students will receive some assistance with supplies and film stock. Lab fee: $100.

    • DMS 415 Computational Media

      Bohlen :: W 1 – 4:40pm :: CFA246
      REG#22425

      This two semester graduate seminar will introduce students to important aspects of the art and science of numerical computing. The goal of the seminar is twofold: One, to understand important principles of numerical representation and two, to explore the procedures and boundaries of numerical representation as a form of creative inquiry.

      We will base our investigations on meteorological data sources and events. We will discuss climate, weather physics, sensor systems, transduction principles, data generation and software, data visualization, time series analysis, basic statistics, clustering techniques, correlation tests and other important data analysis methods. A prosumer weather station and open-source weather software will available for experimentation. We will ‘read’ and discuss environment ‘reporting’ of various kinds in numerically inclined new media as well as established media, including literature and film, in order to position the imaginary and disruptive potential of numerical data representations and manipulations.

      This course will be designed and paced for graduate students without prior exposure to numerical methods and computing. Insights will be applicable to all kinds of data practices, including biological and social media with arge data sets. Beginners will be asked to sign up for the full two semester course sequence. Students taking this two semester version may opt for a creative semester project to combine studio/production with analytical skill training.

      Open to graduate students and advanced undergrads by consent of instructor.

      This course will fulfill advanced analysis or advanced production.

    • DMS 415 FILM, CULTURE & MEDIA THEORY

      Glazier :: T 1pm – 4:40pm :: CFA232
      REG#24338 

      This course develops filmic thinking, reading, and written expression. First, it includes screenings of extraordinary film arts works, many presenting international sensibilities, intriguing geographies, and inventive technical styles, films such as those by Almodovar, Kieslowski, Medem, Subiela, Guzman, Herzog, and Aronofsky, masterpieces that weave narrative in startling patterns, that have us peer through alternative lenses to check the pulse of what it means to think artistically beyond habitual mass media conventions of consumption. It’s about viewing, sensing, touching, opening your fields of perception as an artist, critic, and living being. Secondly, we will close-read short crucial written works about seeing, thinking, and reflecting — Barthes, Benjamin, Deleuze, etc. — theory essential to our contemplations of film, culture, consciousness, new digital horizons. Third, you will write short, reflective responses to films and the texts as course requirements. These responses encourage direct communication of your own ideas to develop your skills in articulating what you see and what it means to you. Attendance and screenings are essential. Required: Class participation, reading, oral presentation, film journal.

      For Media Study majors, this course fulfills advanced analysis, Media and Culture, or Media Study elective.

    • DMS 415 Int/Advanced Film Production: Alternative Means

      Lee :: F 12:00 PM – 4:00 PM :: CFA 278
      REG# 11945

      This is a media production course open to undergraduate and graduate students who have successfully completed a basic-level film production course and solidly grasp the fundamentals of 16mm film production. This course will build upon the basics of film production with an emphasis on: alternative and experimental methods of 16mm production (hand-processing, camera-less film techniques, in-camera special effects, etc.); use of motorized synch-sound film cameras; and the notion of “expanded cinema” in film and video presentation. Short exercises will be assigned in addition to a substantive final project. Hands-on production will be supported with praxis- and theory-based readings and screenings of contemporary and historical work. Note: Emulsion-based film processes can be expensive, so students should expect to spend $250-$400 in additional costs for materials and processing for the course. Students will receive some assistance with supplies and film stock. Lab fee: $100.

    • DMS 415 Social Media and the News Cycle

      Session J
      Khilji :: Online Course
      reg#12150

      This class attempts to analyze the connection between today’s news cycle and social media. What does the age of Twitter, Facebook, YouTube, cellphone cameras and blogs mean for the field of journalism? Is there something to be learned from Web 2.0 or is it something to be shunned and feared? What is the place of traditional journalism? Is it to adapt, or push harder to hold on to its strengths?

      The course will have several readings each week and students will be expected to participate in a discussion board about the readings. They will also be required to report on a current news story each week… both in the form of a blog and a more traditional approach (a written or video piece). The course culminates in a final project/paper exploring some of the topics covered.

    • DMS 415ANS Consciousness and Cognition in Fact and Fantasy

      Anstey :: M/W 11-12:50pm :: CFA 232
      Reg#

      We produce media for conscious minds – human minds. But what is a mind? What is consciousness? what is cognition? In this seminar we will examine and experience works by artists and scientists that specifically attempt to understand the mind; to make a model of the mind; to represent and explain the mind; to mess with the mind. A central assumption of this course is that fact and fantasy both offer compelling insights into the problem of consciousness. The texts include pure fiction, works in the borderlands of fact and fiction, scholarly and scientific inquiry. http://josephineanstey.com/Teaching/CCFF

    • DMS 415LEE Int/Adv Film prod- Alternative means

      Staff :: Friday 1:00pm – 4:40pm :: CFA 278
      Reg#11673

      This is an undergraduate-level media production course designed for students who have successfully completed a basic-level film course and solidly grasp the fundamentals of 16mm film production. Given the increasingly marginalized position of emulsion-based film in the digital era, this course will examine both the challenges and the opportunities of how and why one would use this medium in contemporary practice. This course will build upon the basics of 16mm film production with an emphasis on alternative methods of 16mm production (hand-processing, camera-less film techniques, in-camera special effects, etc). Short exercises will be assigned in addition to a final project. Hands-on production will be supported with technical- and theory-based readings, along with screenings of contemporary and historical work. Note: Emulsion-based film processes can be expensive, so students should expect to spend $150-$300 in additional costs for materials and processing for the course. Students will receive some assistance with supplies and film stock. Prerequisite: DMS 101 Basic Film or approval of the instructor; Lab fee: $100.

    • DMS 416 Experimental Art Workshop (6 Weeks) 1/30/16 – 3/17/16

      Yavuz, Ridvan :: T/Th  5-8pm :: CFA 244
      REG# 24247

      It is an Advanced Production Workshop which pushes the students’ visual storytelling capacities. There is going to be 3 part for teaching in this course: pre-production, production and post production. It is a compressed hands-on workshop which includes all the advanced cinematographic knowledge given in two main parts: The technology part as camera and lighting, and the art of cinematography. Students are going to gain how to use advance camera systems, setups, compositions, manipulations… And especially how to light for creating certain mood with different advanced lighting technics. This course also gives enough sources to understand the art of filmmaking creating by yourself and also creating as a team by considering Hollywood system and beyond studio system. Each student is going to create a short project in advanced level.  Lab fee is $125.

      Ridvanyavuz.com

      Fulfills Advanced Production.

    • DMS 416 Experimental Film

      Ortiz, Eliseo :: M/W 3-4:50pm :: CFA 286
      REG#23612

      This is an intermediate level course to experimental 16mm and super8 film production. Class will expand the knowledge gained in previous film courses and explore new alternatives of experimentation; sessions will include screenings, lectures, demonstrations and exercises. Students will learn how to use optics, projectors and camera devises in unconventional ways. The course will explore the critical relationship between theory and practice in the context of contemporary experimental cinema. By the end of the semester students will be able to create experimental animation/stop motion work on 16mm film, create titles for film, create multichannel installation work, use loopers for film, and film stereoscopic images. Students will be required to complete collaborative class projects and individual assignments. Each student will also be required to complete a final project. Lab fee $100. Possible additional cost for supplies.

      Fulfills Intermediate or Advanced Production Requirement.

    • DMS 416 Global Media and Culture: Theories of Montage and Representation

      Shilina-Conte :: Th 4pm-7:40pm :: CFA112
      REG#22114

      This class will be structured as a comprehensive overview of the theory and practice of montage and representation in global media. Topics for discussion will include staging-in-depth (Bordwell), the Soviet montage school (Eisenstein, Kuleshov, Pudovkin, Vertov), American continuity style, rational and irrational/serial montage (Deleuze), spatiotemporal montage and montage-within-the-shot (Manovich), cinemetrics (Tsivian), QuickTime movies and “memory boxes” (Sobchack), etc. We will trace technological developments in film and digital media that permitted a shift from single frame shots (sequence) to multiple frames, windows and screens (multiplicity). Our special agenda in this class will be to focus on monochrome frames as points of rupture, where they are seen as simultaneously alien and integral to the field of the image. In these cases the cut often functions as both a “scar,” the visible evidence of a filmic cutting/psychic wounding, and a “threshold,” the invisible passage between suppressed history and troubling memory. From these reservoirs of invisible evidence in cinema swarm forth a host of critical issues such as ethnicity, race, sexuality, gender, ethics, trauma and censorship. The topics discussed in this class will help us to understand the connection between cinematic form and content and place mediated representations into social, cultural and historical contexts. Films and excerpts by Sergey Eisenstein, Dziga Vertov, Abel Gance, Jean-Luc Godard, Alain Resnais, Peter Greenaway, Chris Marker, Jim Jarmusch, Derek Jarman, Mania Akbari, Su Friedrich, Marlon Riggs, Alexander Sokurov and Carolee Schneeman will be considered. This class would be indispensable both for students interested in learning how to interpret film and media critically, as well as students who wish to become better editors/makers of their own films/media. Fulfills the Advanced Analysis, Media and Culture or Media Study Electives.

      Fulfills the Advanced Analysis, Media and Culture or Media Study Electives.

    • DMS 416 GRADUATE MEDIA POETICS — REMEDIATING THE SOCIAL

      Prof. Glazier (glazier@buffalo.edu) :: T 3:00pm – 6:30pm :: CFA 232
      REG#23414
      (INSTRUCTOR PERMISSION ONLY)

      This seminar, with a distinct focus each semester, pursues the simple goal of invigorating your work as a graduate student in concert with individual objectives and goals. It aims to move you forward: stimulate your practice and writing projects and deepen your mindful participation in the field. This course can be considered as both theory and as production, where close reading is considered as creative and as intimate as production, and where writing/making is considered as self-reflective and as thoughtful as close reading. Importantly, receiving meaningful and constructive collective peer input by the seminar on your production projects and on your own writing is a priority. Such suggestions and reflections, as well as the ways of reading undertaken in this seminar, have been highly successful in past semesters. This seminar will consist of two principle parts — close reading and the project. [I.] Close Reading will focus on close reading of crucial texts to media poetics. In a normal semester, we read two texts side-by-side, one that is an indispensible pearl of theoretic-thought-as-language masterpiece, and a second text that is either a foundational work in critical thinking, a work of literary thinking, a milestone in philosophy/science, or a work on emerging media (usually digital literatures) uniquely applicable to the event of the seminar. For Spring 2013, we will read Simon Biggs, ed., Remediating the Social: Creativity and Innovation in Practice (ELMCIP, 2012) as well as another theoretical work of media/literature poetics (TBA). My method is for one to read as closely as if one were writing the course text yourself. (We all read the texts in this manner. During the semester, each student will additionally present a close-reading/summary of one section of text, distributing a hand-out of their reading/summary.) Thus, the goal is to both fine-tune reading habits as writing practice, reading in a direct and approachable manner, while discovering ways to freshen the strengths of your own techniques for the writing of your thesis and other projects. [II.] Project will largely consist of work on your own (creative or critical) with the group as a CRUCIAL, committed and engaged sounding board, with opportunities for earnest, thoughtful, and supportive input into the development of your ideas. This will include an early semester presentation of your project idea, a mid-semester feedback event, and a final presentation of the stage your project has moved to at the time. The project will not be worked on during class time, except for rare exceptions, and will rely on a system of group commentary and individual self-motivation for successful completion. The project segment of the course is meant to provide valuable and engaged interaction with the seminar as your artistic community. Admission to this course for advanced juniors or seniors is by INSTRUCTOR PERMISSION ONLY. SPECIAL OPPORTUNITY: While challenging, this course offers a terrific learning opportunity to significantly advance your analysis skills! Please apply by email to the instructor. You should have previous upper division analysis or literature classes and/or have taken classes previously with the professor.

    • DMS 416 Immersive Web & Future Cinema

      staff :: T/Th 3-4:50pm :: CFA244
      Reg#22383

      The web is now an emerging platform for immersive interfaces, Virtual Reality storytelling, VR web apps, and new modes of distribution and consumption for VR and AR. Since 2016, WebVR has become integrated into modern web browsers and is quickly becoming a standard browser integration.  How are media artists and filmmakers using VR, AR, and other immersive storytelling tools? What are web developers designing with web VR? What can we as digital media producers do with Web VR?

      This intermediate media production course will explore these questions and introduce the fundamentals of Web-based Virtual Reality/Augmented Reality, and other forms of 360 immersive media. Students will gain an understanding of the fundamentals and technical components to building Immersive Web projects using the building blocks of web VR and other 360 media techniques. The course will work A-frame (https://aframe.io//mozilla web VR — open source ecosystems for WebGL, and other immersive media production tools, such as shooting with 360 cameras/360 video.

      Throughout the course, we will explore the possibilities of the medium of web-based VR and web AR for various immersive projects, from designing new forms of ‘future cinema’ and trans-media storytelling, to developing prototypes for urban research, and creating prototypes for innovative web projects within networked and hybrid media environments.  

      Ultimately, the aim of the course will be for students to implement a project with one of the tools introduced in order to build an immersive web experience/future cinema project hosted on the web. The projects will be supportable on multiple web VR-supported devices, including mobile, desktop and VR headsets such as Google Cardboard, Oculus Rift and HTC Vive.

      This is an intermediate course. Basic level knowledge of html, css required. Basic familiarity with Adobe Creative Suite required. Basic level knowledge of javascript recommended, but we will start at the beginning/review javascript at the outset.

      Lab Fee: $125

    • DMS 416 Sound and Sense

      Rueb, Teri :: M 1 – 4:40pm  :: CFA235
      REG#24055

      This seminar will be organized around a close reading of philosophers writing on sound and sense.  We will also read and audition the work of sound artists and practitioners who have inquired into the nature of sound and sense through a variety of enactments.  Students will keep media journals–including short listening exercises, writings and sound productions–through which they can explore and reflect upon their everyday sound experiences throughout the semester.  Part seminar, part experimental practice-based research, the course encourages a self-reflexive and performative inquiry into questions regarding the relationship of sound and sense.  Some questions to be considered include:  How has sound been historically understood as one of the (five) senses, how does the naming and categorizing of the senses structure knowledge and ways of knowing, how are hearing and listening related, how do sonic and acoustic metaphors structure consciousness, how do new forms of secondary orality mutually inform ways of knowing and ways of doing, what political implications can we read into an acoustically articulated epistemology?

      Lab fee: $125

      Fulfills Advanced Production Requirement.

    • DMS 417 Contemporary Cinema

      Roussel :: W 9am – 12:40pm :: TBA
      REG#22045

      The Other appears to us in many forms – parent, sibling, teacher, lover, enemy, friend. One thing is constant, however. No matter what form it takes the Other seems to hold the key to our identity. We live in the paradox that what we are in ourselves is determined by someone who is, well, Other.

      This course examines a number of films and written texts that address this paradox. The films include works by Joseph Lousy, Eric Rohmer, Luis Bunuel and William Wyler among others. The texts include several frown-inducing essays but nothing really overwhelming. Many short written assignments plus a longer essay is required at the end of the semester.

      This course will fulfill advanced analysis.

    • DMS 417 Food And Emerging Media

      Session J
      Bardin :: Online Course
      reg#11073

      A course dedicated to exploring the role of emerging media and new technology on the exploration and articulation of topics focussing on the many facets of food. We will be looking at artists who utilize technology to explore and in many cases expose issues within our tightly veiled food production systems. These artists include /The Critical Art Ensemble/ and their “Free Range Grains”/ / project which explores the topic of genetically modified food, /The Yes Men/ and their piece “Re-burger” which addresses issues of starvation in third world countries and the/ //Future Farmers/ who create work that challenge current social, political and economic systems. The course will also focus on issues of /Sustainablity/ and artists who are currently using their practice to explore ways of improving upon food production and distribution models. We will also be looking at the ways chefs, academics and independent acolytes use the Internet to publicize their work, writings and interests and how this medium has influenced the gastronomic landscape. These platforms include the /Association for the Study of Food and Society/ (ASFS) listserv, MIT’s /Counter Intelligence Group/ which focuses on technological approaches to functional, cognitive, and social support in the home and sites like /Ideas in Food/ where Aki Kamozawa and H. Alexander Talbot write in detail on their experiments in flavor and composition. Through a rigorous practice of watching, investigating, talking and writing about artists, chefs, culinary scholars and DIY individuals who utilize media in their discussion, research, profession and practice of food related endeavors, students will gain insight into how these emerging technologies and artistic practices influence the realm of gastronomy as well as the food we eat.Fulfills Advanced Analysis or Media Study Elective

    • DMS 417 On the Road: Media Geographies

       Teri Rueb :: T 1 – 4:40pm :: TBA
      reg: 23939

      The recent convergence of film, video, and sound as delivered via mobile media is explored in this field-based production course that literally takes place on the road.  Students and faculty travel together and work in small teams to create mobile media works that engage the interrelationship of media, movement, and geography as they learn about and experience the landscapes, histories, and cultures of Western New York.


      The course begins with short exercises to introduce formal and technical skills and techniques spanning experimental, non-linear, documentary, narrative and non-narrative forms, especially as they relate to locative media and site-specificity.  Students then work individually or in collaboration to develop site-based works and itineraries that critically research and explore issues of place, culture and identity.  For Fall 2014 we will follow a trajectory that takes us to sites of in Western New York, with a special emphasis on “urban wilds” or disturbed landscapes and locations that have been reclaimed by spontaneous and opportunistic processes, both human and non-human.

      Enrollment is open to graduate and undergraduate students.  Students will be responsible for their own travel expenses as they determine sites for their final projects.  Students should be prepared for field-based work in a variety of weather conditions.

      Lab fee: $100

    • DMS 417 Re-makes: Experiments in Repetition and Difference

      Sarlin :: M/W 11-12:50 :: CFA 235
      Reg# 16300

      From Hollywood blockbusters to the re-packaging of old films in new formats, practices of re-making have been crucial to the history of moving images since the first cinematic experiments with found footage in the 1920s.  This course will focus on processes of revision and reinterpretation as we explore the variety of ways in which repetition can be used to create difference.  Beginning with found footage exercises, students will complete three short assignments and a longer final project over the course of the semester. Students will be encouraged to experiment with narrative and non-narrative material. Special attention will be given to the ways in which presenting the same material in different formats provides an opportunity to address different audiences. Students who are interested in re-working previous pieces are encouraged to take this course as we will think about how remaking provides a model for critical practice. Lab fee $100.

    • DMS 417 The Well Behaved Robot

      Bohlen,Marc :: M/W 10-11:50AM :: CFA 246
      reg#23611

      Who is at fault if a robot car creates a traffic accident?

      This undergraduate seminar will offer an introduction to robot ethics, the question of how synthetic intelligent systems living amongst us should behave and how they might it into everyday life. We will discuss state of the art robotic systems (robot automobiles, pets, servants and military robots) and consider the role of ethics from the perspective of the autonomous machine, the system designers and the general public. Students will be asked to investigate a robotic system of choice and to participate in a group design challenge  to create a well-behaved robot based on the insights gained in class. Lab fee is $100.

      Fulfills Advanced Production or Advanced Analysis Requirement.

    • DMS 418 / DMS 518 On the Road: Media Geographies

      Summer 2012
      Session M July 26 – August 10
      Rueb / Lavenstein
      reg# 12500

      “A traveler! I love his title. A traveler is to be reverenced as such. His profession is the best symbol of our life. Going from ___ toward ___; it is the history of every one of us.”  — “Summer” (Henry David Thoreau)

      The recent convergence of film, video, and sound as delivered via mobile media is explored in this field-based production course that literally takes place on the road.  Students and faculty travel together and work in small teams to create mobile media works that engage the interrelationship of media, movement, and geography as they learn about and experience the landscapes, histories, and cultures of the United States and Canada.

      The course begins with a two-day workshop in Buffalo which includes short exercises to introduce formal and technical skills and techniques spanning experimental, non-linear, documentary, narrative and non-narrative forms, especially as they relate to locative media, film/video and site-specificity.  Students then break into 3-5 teams to follow separate itineraries as they create works that explore their experiences of place and people. Each year a unique itinerary will be determined based on faculty interest and student enrollment.

      For Summer 2012 we will follow a trajectory that takes us to sites of significance in the writings of Henry David Thoreau.  Using the texts “Walking,” “A Yankee in Canada,” “The Maine Woods,” and “Cape Cod” as spring boards for our inquiry into itinerant art forms, we will travel by foot, railway, boat and car throughout the territory defined in the Champlain maps that so impressed Thoreau.  One such map sketched by Thoreau extends from the Great Lakes to Quebec, Maine and down to Massachusetts.  Accordingly, we will travel from Buffalo to Montreal, Quebec City, Maine (where students may optionally choose to climb Mount Katahdin) and finally to Cape Cod and Walden Pond in Massachusetts.

      Enrollment is open to graduate and undergraduate students. Students will be responsible for travel expenses, which will run approximately $800-$1000 per student (transportation and lodging) + meals. In addition to hostelling, we will camp at points along the way, so students should be prepared to bring and/or pool their equipment. Advance registration is recommended.

      Lab Fee is $100

      Instructors:
      Teri Rueb
      http://www.terirueb.net

      Hollie Lavenstein
      http://www.cla.auburn.edu/cmjn/people/faculty/hollie-lavenstein

    • DMS 418 Directing Narratives

      Waham :: T 5-8:40pm :: CFA286
      Reg#23553

      This course addresses the hands-on practice of video production while closely observing the aesthetics of the various stages of video and audio workflow, with a critical examination of form and content.

      The learning objective of this course is for the students to develop the ability to capture video images in various locations under controlled and uncontrolled lighting conditions, record audio, and edit those elements together to tell a compelling story through a series of short assignments, followed by an intensive workshop in writing, directing and producing short narrative films.

      Through practical projects and exercises, the course offers insight into the essential requirements of film and video storytelling and provides hands-on instruction on the technical processes required to successfully produce short films and videos. Filmmaking is a collaborative process and students are encouraged to explore different crew roles (directing, cinematography, sound recording, editing and post-sound) over the projects and exercises that will be assigned in the course, in addition to in-class workshops, discussions and screenings.

      Prerequisites: Intermediate Video Production & Digital Post-Production

      Lab Fee: $125

      Fulfills Advanced Production Requirement.

    • DMS 418 Dis/connections in Media Culture

      Karppi :: M/W 1 – 2:50pm :: CFA235
      REG#22048 

      Our life is penetrated by different digital networks and social media systems. We communicate via Facebook or Twitter. Our social life is being organized by these networks. They notify us about events, birthdays and even things we might want to buy. These systems have become so ubiquitous that we hardly notice their existence, except when they fail. Failures, breaks, disconnections make these connections visible in new ways.
      This seminar will investigate different connections and disconnections in media. For example we will map the discourses around Web 2.0 and user participation and examine the ideological and economic principles of social media systems. We will look at things that challenge these user models such as dead Facebook users or online trolls. The course is focused on digital media specific material but not limited to it. In addition to reading assignments the students will do tasks and assignments where they analytically approach the themes of the lecture each week.
      Students taking this course at 400-level will have an exam at the end of the course and students taking this course at 500-level will do a written essay.

    • DMS 418 On the road: Media Geographies

      Rueb :: M 1-4pm :: cfa252
      Reg#21263

      The recent convergence of film, video, and sound as delivered via mobile media is explored in this field-based production course that literally takes place on the road.  Students and faculty travel together and work in small teams to create mobile media works that engage the interrelationship of media, movement, and geography as they learn about and experience the landscapes, histories, and cultures of Western New York.

      The course begins with short exercises to introduce formal and technical skills and techniques spanning experimental, non-linear, documentary, narrative and non-narrative forms, especially as they relate to locative media, film/video and site-specificity.  Students then break into 3-5 teams to follow separate itineraries as they create works that explore their experiences of place and people.

      For Fall 2013 we will follow a trajectory that takes us to sites of significance in Western New York, with a special emphasis on sites that are key to Native American perspectives on landscape and the environment.

      Enrollment is open to graduate and undergraduate students.  Students will be responsible for their own travel expenses as they determine sites for their final projects.  Group field trips, which include transportation, will run approximately $100 total per student.

      Lab fee:  $100

    • DMS 418 Scriptwriting: All Media

      Anstey :: MW 11:00AM – 12:50PM :: CFA 235
      reg#17217

      In this production workshop students will concentrate on writing and editing text/script elements for their media projects. The course will explore both traditional and experimental methods for generating and structuring text for fictional and documentary work. Texts may include original writing, interview material, collaged or found fragments, that will be performed, heard or displayed in the final piece. The texts may be linear, non-linear, interactive, poetic … This opportunity to focus on the text is for students at any stage of a project (conception through finishing); in any media (film, video, animation, performance, interactive); and those working with English as a second language or with translated material.
      Fulfills Advanced * Intermediate Requirement.

    • DMS 418 The filmic text

      Shilina-Conte :: T 3:00PM – 6:40PM :: CFA 112
      REG#16219

      A feast for the eyes, this class will take you on an “over the rainbow tour” of color history and effects in cinema.”There never was a silent film,” famously declared Irving Thalberg, and just as with sound, color has accompanied cinema since the day of its inception. Early filmmakers employed applied processes such as hand-tinting or stenciling of film stock,long before the advent of such photographic systems as Technicolor and Eastmancolor. After a brief overview of the history of cinematic color, we will concentrate on its expressive and affective use as a means of evoking atmosphere, establishing mood and conveying implicit messages. We will examine color palettes of various directors, comparing Tom Tykwer’s saturated and succulent reds and yellows with Andrey Tarkovsky’s subdued and subtle greens and browns. We will also discuss the concept of synesthesia and color’s ability to create cross-communication among the senses through visual outbursts of emotion. Our special agenda in this class will be to scrutinize color symbolism with a particular emphasis on monochromatic images as abstract canvases of negative space, including those of black and white, as vital filmic fluids. Films and excerpts will include a number of early shorts, Flowers and Trees, Becky Sharp, Ivan the Terrible, Niagara, The Red Balloon, Kwaidan, Shadows of Forgotten Ancestors, Stalker, Cinema Paradiso, Trois Couleurs, Blue, Run Lola Run, 20 Fingers, and The Fall, among others. This course fulfills the Advanced Analysis or Media Study electives.

    • DMS 420 Advanced Digital Arts Production

      Pape :: M/W 11am-12:50pm :: cfa242
      Reg#23738

      This course will focus on thematic, conceptual and creative issues as students produce computer-based works for interactive media. It will be a place for students to initiate and follow through on substantive projects based both in creative concepts and technical research. It will be open to any and all types of computer-based or technology-driven work, projects designed exclusively for viewing with computer and monitor and projects that involve installation or physical computing elements. Students should come with considerable skills in this area, be motivated to try new things, and be prepared for critiques. $100 Lab Fee.Fulfills Advanced * Intermediate Requirement.

    • DMS 420 Advanced Digital Arts Production

      staff :: MW 11:00AM – 12:50PM :: CFA 244
      REG# 23678

      The conceptual and practical production of a multimedia digital art project, that uses tools like moving image, still image, text and sound to be then hosted online using HTML, CSS and Javascript (Open to processing as well, based on student capability) . Students should have basic knowledge of Photoshop, any video and sound editing software, HTML and CSS

      Lab fee $125

      Fulfills Advanced Production.

    • DMS 422 Buffalo Film Seminars/ Film Directors

      Jackson :: T 7:00PM – 9:40PM :: Off Campus
      REG# 23008

      The Buffalo Film Seminars take place Tuesday nights at 7 p.m. promptly, at the Dipson Amherst Theatre, 3500 Main St., Buffalo, NY 14226.

      Each week Diane Christian and Bruce Jackson introduce the film, the film is screened, we take a brief break, and then have an open discussion with students in a University at Buffalo film class and anyone else who cares to join us.

      Tickets for the seminars are adults $9, students $7, seniors $6.50. Season tickets are available any time at a 15% reduction for the cost of the remaining films. Free parking.

      Handouts with production details, anecdotes and critical comments about each week’s film on goldenrod paper are available in the lobby 45 minutes before each session. The Goldenrod handouts are posted online one day before the screening. (All previous handouts are also online.)

      The Buffalo Film Seminars are presented by the University at Buffalo.

      Fulfill Advanced Analysis OR Advanced Theory.

    • DMS 422 Contemporary Cinema: The Problem of the Other

      Roussel, Royal :: W 9 – 11:40am :: CFA 112
      REG# 24239

      The Other appears to us in many forms – parent, sibling, teacher, lover, enemy, friend. One thing is constant, however, no matter what form it takes the Other seems to hold the key to our identity. We live in the paradox that what we are in ourselves is determined by someone who is, well, Other.

      This course examines a number of films and written texts that address this paradox. The films include works by Joseph Lousy, Eric Rohmer, Luis Bunuel and William Wyler among others. The texts include several frown-inducing essays but nothing really overwhelming. Many short written assignments plus a longer essay is required at the end of the semester.

      Fulfills Advanced Analysis, Advanced Theory.

    • DMS 422 Film Directors

      Jackson, T , 7:00 PM – 9:40 PM
      reg # 24438

      HELD AT THE AMHERST THEATRE, MAIN STREET ACROSS FROM THE SOUTH CAMPUS

      Analysis of aspects of feature filmmaking based on study and discussion of classic films by great directors. For example: Prof. Bruce Jackson, The Buffalo Film Seminars This class is an experiment in looking at and talking about films. It?s a regular UB class, but the general public is welcome to attend. The two of us introduce each film, we screen it, we take a short break, and then we talk about the film with the students and anyone in the audience who wants to join us. The non-student part of the audience has been running over 200 people for each screening, about half of whom stay for the discussions. The Buffalo Film Seminars are grounded in two underlying assumptions. The first is that watching a good film on a television set is like reading a good novel in Cliff?s Notes or Classic Comics: you may get the contour of the story but not the experience of the work. Movies were meant to be seen big, in the company of other people. The second is that a conversation among people of various ages and experiences about a good movie they?ve all just seen can be interesting and useful. We try to pick films that will let us think and talk about genre, writing, narrative, editing, directing, acting, context, camera work, relation to sources. The only fixed requirement is that they have to be great films–no films of “academic” interest only. For example: Prof. D. Schmid, Hitchcock The aim of this class is to watch and discuss a representative sample of films from the long and distinguished career of the great director Alfred Hitchcock (1899-1980). You will learn why Hitchcock is considered to be one of the supreme masters of the film genre, what the major themes and concerns of his work are, and how to approach and analyze a Hitchcock film. Along the way, we will discuss such subjects as auteur theory, film history, and cinematic technique. Throughout the class, we will emphasize how Hitchcock himself and his films have come to embody the possibilities of cinema.

    • DMS 422 Film Directors

      Jackson :: Tu 7:00PM-9:40PM :: TBA
      REG#20378

    • DMS 422 The Korean Wave

      staff :: T R , 3:30 PM – 4:50 PM :: Clemen117
      Reg#25143

      This course will explore the Korean Wave, a term that is used to describe the new international popularity of South Korean popular culture since late 1990s. From a brief study of the origin and history of the Korean Wave, we will move to analyze the specific features of popular culture industries in South Korea?from the big screen through broadcasting and the music industry to video games. This class is designed to be not only a guide map for those who would like to have in-depth understanding about the Korean Wave but also a road map for those who plan to work in South Korean Entertainment industry. No prior knowledge of South Korean popular culture is required. South Korean films and TV shows will be provided with English subtitles.

    • DMS 422 VIDEO ANALYSIS

      Conrad, T.
      T 5:00pm – 6:50pm SEM CFA 112
      R 3:00PM – 4:50PM LAB CFA 232

      Reg # 24469 SEM (3 cr.), #13921 LAB (1 cr.)

      Pre-Requisite: DMS 341 Or DMS 400

      Note: Students must enroll in DMS 422SEM and DMS 422LAB  in the same term.

      A survey of contemporary video and media art. The aim of this course is to provide access to contemporary media arts information, and in particular to media work which is generally unavailable otherwise in Buffalo — and then to provide a forum for discussion, and for developing our own ideas. Most of the Tuesday meetings will comprise screenings of work. Then on Wednesdays the Undergrad and Graduate sections will meet separately to discuss the artists whose works have been seen and related topics of media arts interest. Some of the classes will be conducted via Skype, including interactive meetings with visiting artists whenever possible. Students should plan to take notes on the screenings and other activities, since a lot of ground will be covered rapidly. Assignments will include online viewing of other video works and short weekly written exercises in the form of terse commentaries with accompanying citations from online sources. Some assigned articles will be made available online, along with lots of recommended reading resources. Since access to the work screened in class is very limited, attendance is mandatory. There is no lab fee and no final exam – so regular weekly participation is especially important.

      Fulfills Advanced Analysis, Media & Culture or elective requirement.

    • DMS 423 Programming Graphics 1

      Pape :: M/W 9 – 10:50am :: CFA242
      Lab-REG#18390 
      Lec-REG#21364

      This production course will introduce students to the concepts and practice of programming 3D computer graphics and audio using OpenGL and other libraries. The major focus will be on creating interactive art or games experiences by programming both graphics and sound. The course has three goals: to demystify computer code – we get behind the Graphic User Interface to the machine below; to explore the potential of programming – writing our own code means we can create customized computer tools as well as customized visuals; and to teach the fundamentals of graphics programming. Prerequisites are experience in a programming language such as Python, C, C++, or Java (DMS 121, CSE 113/4/5 or equivalent). Lab fee $100. Contact: dave.pape@acm.org

    • DMS 423 Programming Graphics 1

      Pape, Dave :: MW 1-2:50pm :: CFA 242
      REG# 24244

      This production course will introduce students to the concepts and practice of programming 3D computer graphics and audio using OpenGL and other libraries. The major focus will be on creating interactive art or games experiences by programming both graphics and sound. The course has three goals: to demystify computer code – we get behind the Graphic User Interface to the machine below; to explore the potential of programming – writing our own code means we can create customized computer tools as well as customized visuals; and to teach the fundamentals of graphics programming. Prerequisites are experience in a programming language such as Python, C, C++, or Java (DMS 121, CSE 113/4/5 or equivalent). Lab fee $100. Contact: dave.pape@acm.org

      Fulfills Advanced Production.

    • DMS 423 Programming Graphics I

      Pape :: TuTh 2:00PM-3:50PM :: CFA 242
      Lecture REG#23727
      Lab Reg#24385
      Student must register for both lecture and lab

    • DMS 425 Visual Media Poetics

      Glazier:: M/W 3-4:50pm :: CFA 242
      REG# 22126

      Visual Media Poetics provides the opportunity to explore the expressive potential of language as a creative material existing on alphabetic, visual, and aural levels, with a focus on visual forms of cultural expression. Visual anthropology will provide a significant lens through which to view visual media and its impact on the cultural milieu. We will take multiple approaches to visual expression, including cultural studies, visual theories, the photographic image, the virtual, representations of the cultural/historic “other”, and sexual/embodied practices, among others The immense value of 20th century experimental literature and innovative film to he student’s own efforts to design or interpret media writing is an additional concern of this course. We will be thinking about the varied possibilities of language as a conjunction of textures, tones, meanings, and media. We will look at media “literature” as a merging of form, image, language, and sound, and we will explore works that successfully produce this extraordinary effect. We will look at works of Concrete, digital, and text poetry and consider these as models for digital media design. We will study theoretical essays and manifestos related to visual media practice, investigating modes and means of visual media expression as seen through a number of documentary and narrative films, including popular and arts films focused on visual imaginations (ranging from Almodovar, Buñuel, and Fellini to Apocalyto and King Kong). Course requirements: Weekly readings (to be announced), an oral presentation, a final project, exams, quizzes, and brief written assignments as necessary. Attendance is crucial.

      Text-Into the Universe of Technical Images_ by Vilem Flusser (Minnesota UP)

      For Media Study majors, this course fulfills advanced analysis or Media Study elective.

    • DMS 425 Visual Media Poetics

      Glazier :: T 1:00PM – 4:40PM :: CFA 232
      REG# 23687

      Visual Media Poetics provides the opportunity to explore the expressive potential of language as a creative material existing on alphabetic, visual, and aural levels, with a focus on visual forms of cultural expression. Visual anthropology will provide a significant lens through which to view visual media and its impact on the cultural milieu. We will take multiple approaches to visual expression, including cultural studies, visual theories, the photographic image, the virtual, representations of the cultural/historic “other”, and sexual/embodied practices, among others The immense value of 20th century experimental literature and innovative film to he student’s own efforts to design or interpret media writing is an additional concern of this course. We will be thinking about the varied possibilities of language as a conjunction of textures, tones, meanings, and media. We will look at media “literature” as a merging of form, image, language, and sound, and we will explore works that successfully produce this extraordinary effect. We will look at works of Concrete, digital, and text poetry and consider these as models for digital media design. We will study theoretical essays and manifestos related to visual media practice, investigating modes and means of visual media expression as seen through a number of documentary and narrative films, including popular and arts films focused on visual imaginations (ranging from Almodovar, Buñuel, and Fellini to new cinema works, with an emphasis on culturally diverse perspectives). Course requirements: Weekly readings (to be announced), an oral presentation, a final project, exams, quizzes, and brief written assignments as necessary. Attendance is crucial.

      Text-TBA

      Fulfills Advanced Theory and Advanced Analysis.

    • DMS 429 Italian Cinema

      Chiesa:: T/TH 11-12:50
      REG#22125

    • DMS 429 Italian Cinema

      Chiesa,Laura:: T/TH 3:30-4:50pm :: Capen 110
      REG#23654

    • DMS 434 Art of Vision — Cancelled

      Caplan :: T R , 11:00 AM – 12:50 PM : CFA 232
      reg# 16521

      In every production situation there are a series of questions, which detail a variety of aesthetic choice. Those issues have to do with camera placement, camera angle, and length of shot, exposure, framing, all light, sound and movement. The Art of Vision is a course structured to increase student sensibility toward the art of filmmaking. This course will examine and answer those production issues in an attempt to make the student aware of the range of possibilities when confronted with shooting on location, in the field or in a studio. Through intense weekly production, lecture, selected screenings, and a high degree of experimentation, students will be guided individually to develop their own filmmaking skill. Students will be responsible for choosing their direction of production, which can incorporate any number of genres, including thesis work. A high level of production will be stressed and students will work in digital video, film, photography and sound-only situations. Students who attend this class should be prepared to work hard to achieve results.
      Lab fee is $100

    • DMS 434 Mobile Apps With HTML5

      Markert :: Th 1 – 4:40pm :: cfa246
      Reg#24274
      Lab Fee – $100

      Did you ever wish to design an app for your iPhone? Or do you have an idea for the next awesome creative coding experience on the iPad? Do you have a new Android Tablet and want to make something cool with it? This is your chance!
      We will work with the latest cross-platform HTML5 web technologies (mainly the ECMA scripting language, better known as JavaScript; including CSS3) to create applications that will run on your mobile device.

      Participants should already know HTML and CSS; knowing at least one programming language (e.g. Processing) will be most helpful.

      MobileMarkertFall2014

      Michael Markert is visiting from the Bauhaus University Weimar. Last year he taught a weekend long Mobile Media Workshop at UB and now he is back teaching a semester long Mobile Media seminar. Markert is a media-artist specializing in programming and electronics. He is a member of the Urban Research Institute for Public Art and Urban Ethology. He researches into intuitive musical interfaces and develops, “various interactive sensory devices which he has used for installations and as musical instruments. The focus of his work is exploring cybernetic interaction systems through intuitive and interactive realtime sensory processing thereby overruling hierarchic receptional mechanisms in art.”

    • DMS 435 Narrative Scriptwriting

      Session X
      Reissman
      reg# 12072
      _FROM CONCEPT TO COMPLETION:How to develop a screenplay._

      This intensive summer course will explore development of feature films
      and the steps involved in transforming an idea to a screenplay.We will
      assess story ideas and their origination: will discuss character, theme,
      structure, plot.We will explore the use of log lines, treatments and
      script coverage, pitching and collaboration.The course structure will be
      comprised of exercises, lectures, and screenings. The daily schedule is
      subject to change.

    • DMS 435 Scriptwriting: All Media

      Anstey :: T/TH 1-2:50 :: CFA 232
      REG#22131

      In this production workshop students will concentrate on writing and editing text/script elements for their media projects. The course will explore both traditional and experimental methods for generating and structuring text for fictional and documentary work. Texts may include original writing, interview material, collaged or found fragments, that will be performed, heard or displayed in the final piece. The texts may be linear, non-linear, interactive, poetic…

      http://josephineanstey.com/Teaching/ScriptWritingAllMedia

    • DMS 435 Scriptwriting: All Media

      Anstey,Josephine R :: MW 11am – 12:50pm :: CFA235
      Reg#24058

      In this production workshop students will concentrate on writing and editing text/script elements for their media projects. The course will explore both traditional and experimental methods for generating and structuring text for fictional and documentary work. Texts may include original writing, interview material, collaged or found fragments, that will be performed, heard or displayed in the final piece. The texts may be linear, non-linear, interactive, poetic…

      http://josephineanstey.com/Teaching/ScriptWritingAllMedia

      Lab fee: $125.

      This course will fulfill advanced production.

    • DMS 435 Scriptwriting: All Media

      Anstey :: T 11am-2:40pm :: CFA232
      Reg#23521

      In this production workshop students will concentrate on writing and editing text/script elements for their media projects. The course will explore both traditional and experimental methods for generating and structuring text for fictional and documentary work. Texts may include original writing, interview material, collaged or found fragments, that will be performed, heard or displayed in the final piece. The texts may be linear, non-linear, interactive, poetic …

      This opportunity to focus on the text is for students at any stage of a project (conception through finishing); in any media (film, video, animation, performance, game, interactive installation); and those working with English as a second language or with translated material. However all students will work through three basic writing stages: creating/generating material; assembling/structuring material; editing/restructuring.

    • DMS 438 Virtual Worlds 1

      Pape :: W 5-8:40pm :: CFA 286
      REG#23621

      Lab fee is $100.

      Fulfills Advanced Production.

    • DMS 439 Virtual Worlds

      Pape :: MW 9-10:50am :: CFA242
      Reg#23554

      This course will cover the principles, history, and applications of immersive virtual reality.  We will examine both head-mounted (Oculus Rift, HTC Vive, etc) and projection-based (CAVE) VR.  This is a production course where students will be students are encouraged to create imaginative and compelling interactive, immersive graphic and audio environments. A background of some intermediate production skill (modeling/animation, programming, or video) is expected.

      Lab fee: $125

      Fulfills Advanced production requirement.

    • DMS 439 Virtual Worlds – Projected Spaces

      Pape :: :: CFA 242
      REG#

      The projector is more than just a way to show movies on a big screen. Modern digital projectors can be a powerful tool for creating virtual spaces, overlaid on the real world. In this course we will examine uses of projection, from the media pre-historical days of the camera obscura to present day applications in art installations, theatrical performance,
      and virtual environments. Students will also be creating their own projection-based projects, which can feature any form of electronic media.

      Prerequisite: any intermediate production work that can be projected.
      Lab fee: $100.
      Fulfills Advanced Production requirement

    • DMS 439 Virtual Worlds 2

      Noonan :: TR 1pm – 2:50pm :: CFA 242
      REG #16364

      Increasingly we live, play, and work in virtual worlds created by computer graphics, 3D models, scripts and programs; places inhabited by networked people and autonomous computer characters. Students with a background in 3D modeling and/or programming are encouraged to take this production course, where the creative process will be seeded by a study of virtual, augmented, and mixed reality worlds built by artists, activists, and game-designers. We will also consider questions of values in games, and critical, experimental & activist design practices.

      Students will be introduced to production flow and issues of working collaboratively as student teams focus on the creation of one major, finished project in Unity 3D. Projects will go through the following stages: concept brain-storming; concept refinement; design documents (design drawings, interactive plan, allocation of tasks, timeline etc.); implementation1; user/player testing; implementation 2; final show

    • DMS 441 Advanced Video Production

      Waham :: Tu 5-8:40pm :: CFA286
      Reg# 22383

      This course addresses the hands-on practice of video production while closely observing the aesthetics of the various stages of video and audio workflow, with a critical examination of form and content.
      The objective of this course is for the students to develop the ability to capture video images in various locations under controlled and uncontrolled lighting conditions, record audio, and edit those elements together to tell a compelling story.
      Through intensive practical projects and exercises, the course offers insight into the essential requirements of film and video storytelling and provides hands-on instruction on the technical processes required to successfully produce short films and videos. Filmmaking is a collaborative process and students are encouraged to explore different crew roles (directing, cinematography, sound recording, editing and post sound) over the projects and exercises that will be assigned in the course, in addition to in-class workshops, discussions and screenings.

      Fulfills Advanced Production requirement.

      Prerequisites: 341

      Lab fee is $125

    • DMS 442 Advanced Video Production

      Conrad :: T 1 – 4:40pm :: CFA 235
      REG#24060

      “My personal work feels like an oil slick on this flowing current, spreading in two or three directions at once”- Tony Conrad

      This is an advanced production course with Professor Tony Conrad. Tony has been doing research tracing the “science and technology” history of music all the way back into the 17th century, while also working with Tony Oursler on his Influence Machine project, which addresses the twinning of communications and spiritualism in the nineteenth century. He has been a constant and dedicated contributor to the media community here in Western NY—whether through our regional media centers, or public access cable TV, or the galleries and museum here. Much of his artistic production (and visibility) in recent years has been in audio performance or installation, often with a strong visual complement.

      .Lab fee of $125
      This course will fulfill advanced production.

    • DMS 442 Advanced Video Production

      Braemer,Dorothea :: Th 11am – 2:40pm :: CFA 232
      REG#21878

      This course is a narrative-based, production-and writing intensive class
      focusing on scriptwriting for short film, scene analysis and directing. In
      the first half of the class we will focus on script writing and scene
      analysis, while in the second part we will collectively produce and direct
      scenes we have written in the first part. The course emphasizes hands-on
      production and directing experience and personal and creative expression
      through short narrative film. Lab fee is $100.

      Fulfills Advanced Production.

    • DMS 447 J Sound Design

      Session J
      Bouquard :: Monday-Wednesday 5-8:40pm :: CFA 278
      reg# 11202

      The object of sound design is to explore issues and techniques in the area of sound design and digital audio production. The “visual” media –film and video- are powerfully inflected by their accompanying audio tracks, which frequently convey the work’s preponderant sensibility, or even its core meaning. This course will prepare students technically, conceptually and musically to work with audio. Lab fee $100.

    • DMS 447 Sound Design

      Bouquard :: M/W 1:00PM – 2:50PM :: CFA232
      REG#19315

      The object of sound design is to explore issues and techniques in the area of sound design and digital audio production. The “visual” media –film and video- are powerfully inflected by their accompanying audio tracks, which frequently convey the work’s preponderant sensibility, or even its core meaning. This course will prepare students technically, conceptually and musically to work with audio. Lab fee $100.

      This course fulfills intermediate or advanced production.

    • DMS 447 Sound Design

      Bouquard :: M/W 1:00-2:50 p.m. :: 235 CFA
      Reg# 20565

      The object of sound design is to explore issues and techniques in the area of sound design and digital audio production. The “visual” media –film and video- are powerfully inflected by their accompanying audio tracks, which frequently convey the work’s preponderant sensibility, or even its core meaning. This course will prepare students technically, conceptually and musically to work with audio. Lab fee $100.

    • DMS 447 Sound Design

      Bouquard :: MW 3:00PM – 4:50PM :: CFA 235
      REG# 24252

      This course will introduce film/video/animation students into world of image and sound postproduction, to provide knowledge and tools necessary to complete post work on their projects. All areas of digital postproduction editing and sound design from editing to final mixing will be explored. As well as how to effectively use sound design to enhance storytelling capability of films, evaluate music choices, music edit, create sound design to enhance story points, discover design opportunities, and select right sound effects. Powerful sound design helps create a strong emotional effect on audiences by enhancing a video/film’s pace, tone, and feel. In this course, learn how to make convincing sound effects and tracks for a video/film/animation. Through the study of effects and Foley, gain a thorough understanding of what it takes to create a high-impact soundtrack to support a picture. Gain hands-on experience using Pro Tools and walk away knowing how to use sound to give projects emphasis and punch. $100 lab fee

    • DMS 447 Sound Design

      Bouquard,Michael John :: MW 1 – 2:50pm :: CFA 232
      REG#18475

      The object of sound design is to explore issues and techniques in the area of sound design and digital audio production. The “visual” media –film and video- are powerfully inflected by their accompanying audio tracks, which frequently convey the work’s preponderant sensibility, or even its core meaning. This course will prepare students technically, conceptually and musically to work with audio. Lab fee $100.

      Fulfills Intermediate or Advanced Production Requirement.

    • DMS 447 Sound Design

      Bouquard  :: TH 1pm – 4:40pm  :: CFA232
      REG#23677

      The object of sound design is to explore issues and techniques in the area of sound design and digital audio production. The “visual” media –film and video- are powerfully inflected by their accompanying audio tracks, which frequently convey the work’s preponderant sensibility, or even its core meaning. This course will prepare students technically, conceptually and musically to work with audi

      Lab fee is $125

      Fulfills Advanced Production Requirement.

    • DMS 447 Sound Design

      Bouquard :: TuTh 9:00AM-10:50PM :: CFA 232
      REG#20754

    • DMS 448 Game Studies Colloquium

      Anstey :: TR 1:00 PM – 2:50 PM :: CFA 235
      REG#23971

      The goal of this advanced theory course is to provide you with analytical tools and a background in readings to address the history, design, cultures, and theory of games and gaming. Taking games as a broad category describing a variety of design, production, and play practices, we will examine analog games, digital and computer games, as well as other, more experimental forms, through lenses varying from art history to economics to philosophy to computer science. This course will provide a strong foundation for students interested in the history of games, game design for artists, play as activism, and contemporary media cultures.
      Students will engage in independent research and develop their own ideas around games and gaming. We will provide you with support – both theoretical and technical – to expand your research, writing, and rhetorical skills. The broad base of topics we will address will guarantee that you will find something that piques your interest.

    • DMS 448 Games, Gender & Culture

      Nam :: T/Th 9-10:50pm :: CFA235
      Reg#21016

    • DMS 448 Games, Gender and Society

      Staff :: M/W 11:00AM – 12:50PM :: CFA232
      REG#23937

    • DMS 448 Games, Gender and Society

      Curry :: T/TH 1pm – 2:50pm  :: CFA232
      REG#24057

      Video games are an increasingly dominant cultural form, industry, and technology driver. The emerging field of Game Studies recognizes that questions of gender are crucial to understanding the role of videos games in society. The goal of this advanced theory course is to provide students with analytical tools to address the history, design, cultures, and theory of games and gaming, with specific focus on gender representation and gender performance.  Although gender is fore-fronted as a frame for games analysis and research, the  course also considers how race, class, and ethnic differences are represented in games.

      Fulfills Advanced Analysis.

    • DMS 448 Games, Gender and Society

      staff :: T/Th 9 – 10:50am :: CFA 235
      REG# 22444

      Video games are an increasingly dominant cultural form, industry, and technology driver. The emerging field of Game Studies recognizes that questions of gender are crucial to understanding the role of videos games in society. The goal of this advanced theory course is to provide students with analytical tools to address the history, design, cultures, and theory of games and gaming, with specific focus on gender representation and gender performance. Although gender is fore-fronted as a frame for games analysis and research, the course also considers how race, class, and ethnic differences are represented in games. Fulfills Advanced Analysis.

      Fulfills Advanced Analysis or Advanced Theory.

    • DMS 455 B Movies

      Session M
      Kolberg :: Online Course
      Reg#12036

      Beginning with the B-Movie’s origins in the 1930’s this course will explore the history and evolution of the B-Mov.
      The postwar science fiction boom of the 50’s gave rise to some of the B’s most popular movies: “Them!,” “Earth vs the Spider,” “The Amazing Colossal Man,” “I Married a Monster from Outer Space,” “The Brain that Wouldn’t Die,” “The Attack of the Killer Shrews,” “Attack of the Crab Monsters,” and “Tarantula” to name just a few.
      We will look at the ways that these movies embody the symbolic representations of Cold War anxieties: communist infiltration; nuclear disaster; and worries about new developments in science and technology. Other interpretations read these films as a Freudian expression of the id: the external embodiment of our darkest unconscious drives and desires.
      We will look at the B-movie aesthetic, including how the low budgets heightened the directors’ creativity and gave them the freedom to experiment, with both fabulous and disastrous results. We will explore what it is that makes these films “so bad they’re good” and examine why some of these films are simply terrible, while others have become cult classics.
      Along the way we will watch a variety of B-Movies, such as “Robot Monster,” “Forbidden Planet,” “The Wasp Woman,” and what many have called the worst movie ever made, the cult classic “Plan 9 from Outer Space.”
      Course expectations include regular participation in on-line discussions, readings, short written responses to the readings, and a short critical paper. Popcorn is optional, but recommended.
      The films will be readily available through Netflix and/or public libraries.

    • DMS 455 J Media Archeology

      Session J
      Coletta :: Tuesday-Thursday 9am-12:40pm :: CFA235
      reg#11801

      This course will introduce students to the emerging field of Media Archaeology and its theoretical and methodological concerns, while challenging them to engage with non-liner, cyclical, and hybrid approaches to media production. Students will begin by gaining a basic understanding of optics and perspective in relation to light, shadow, and the moving image. An examination of early (pre-cinematic) visual media will follow and we will consider the many “scopes” and “tropes” of the 19th century (thaumatrope, zoetrope, phenakistoscope), along with other optical toys, devices, and marvelous inventions (panorama, tableaux vivant, camera obscura). A non-linear “history” of media technologies will be stressed as we consider these early, foundational technologies in relation to todays’ media practices and movements (digital video, computer animation, steampunk), moving towards an inclusive understanding that uses Archaeological methods to “excavate” early media supposed by many to be obsolete. This is a journey filled with magicians and magic, con artists, entertainers, eccentric entrepreneurs, and a sense of the fantastic. In addition to regular readings students will be expected to produce several short projects (using media of their choice) that engage with the themes of the course. As one of the field’s preeminent scholars, Siegfried Zielinski, suggests, we will aspire to “Not seek the old in the new, but find something new in the old.”

    • DMS 455 Social Web Media

      Clark :: M/W 1:00PM – 2:50PM :: CFA 235
      Reg # 19515

      What does social media look like after the recent world events? How will the advent of Google+ and emerging social media change the landscape of the social web? What comes after social media? How will you use it? What will you create? This class combines analysis of web media in terms of participation and community formation with practical skills needed to shape the future of social media. We will examine social networking sites, blogging, peer-to-peer networks, reputation economies, mobile communication technologies, activism, and surveillance while developing a critical framework for discussing the state of networked culture. We will also gain a practical understanding of New Media through the use and creation of our own social web tools.

      This fulfill advanced analysis or an elective.

    • DMS 456

      Glazier :: T 3:30PM – 6:30PM :: CFA 232
      REG #20107

    • DMS 457 Locative Media and the City

      Rueb, Teri :: M  1-4:40  :: CFA 235
      REG# 24255

      “The recent convergence of film, video, and sound as delivered via mobile media is explored in this field-based production course that literally takes place on the road. Students and faculty travel together and work in small teams to create mobile media works that engage the interrelationship of media, movement, and geography.”

    • DMS 457 Locative Media and the City

      Reub :: We 1:00PM-3:40PM :: CFA 235
      REG# 15586

      The recent convergence of film, video, and sound as delivered via locative mobile media is explored in this field-based production course. We will travel together and work in small teams to create locative mobile media works that engage the interrelationship of media, movement, narrative and urban geography. The course begins with short exercises to introduce formal and technical skills and techniques spanning experimental, non-linear, documentary, narrative and non-narrative forms, especially as they relate to locative media and site-specificity. Students then work individually or in collaboration to develop site-based works and itineraries that critically research and explore issues of place, culture and identity. We will also being screening a series of “city films” to investigate the relationships between cinema and the city, as precursor to new modes of mediated representations of, and interventions into, urban space. Enrollment is open to graduate and undergraduate students. Students will be responsible for their own travel expenses for field trips and as they determine sites for their final projects. Students should be prepared for field-based work and critique in a variety of weather conditions.
There is a lab fee of $125.

    • DMS 461 Machines, Codes, Culture

      Bohlen :: M W , 9:00 AM – 10:50 AM :: cfa 112
      REG:23491

      This course will follow the history of machines and coding systems from the monastery bell to the latest humanoid robot; from the origins of numeric notation to protocols of cloud computing in select episodes. This is not a history course, but an overview of concepts related to information technologies that substantially impact daily life. Consequently, the course will focus on cultural aspects of technologies and the myriad ways in which they are woven into the fabric of human activities, both in personal and public domains. Topics will include numbering systems, information and encoding, autonomous robots, interaction design, household smart appliances, the Internet of Things, social media and cloud computing. Students will introduced to these concepts through texts and guided through them in weekly discussions. Materials will be gathered from diverse authors such as: Lewis Mumford, Paul Virilio, Harun Farocki, Friedrich Kittler, Michel Foucault, Caroline Marvin, Hans Moravec, Marvin Minsky, Sherry Turkle, Bruno Latour, Reviel Netz and others. Grades will be based on a semester position paper, a multiple choice exam and participation in class discussions. We will watch videos. Open to all students!

      This course will fulfill advanced analysis.

    • DMS 462 Game Design

      Pape :: M/W 9 – 10:50AM :: CFA242
      REG#23492

      Production course on the design of games, both computer-based and analog.Games are considered as a new art form and in order to create compelling games, students must be aware of the particularities of the form in both structural and aesthetic terms. Clearly the most important difference between games and other art forms are the interactive and interpersonal dynamics of gaming. Core isues of game design; what is a game? what is the nature of play? what makes for good game play? what are the core characteristics and structure of a game? and what are the roles of engagement, narrative, and interactivity in games? Encourages experimental thinking about the boundaries and possibilities of games. Students work in teams to produce a complete game. Thorough, hands-on grounding in the process of game design, including brainstorming, paper prototyping, play-testing, and iterative design. From conception to play-testing, and fosters the skills required to produce, examine, and critique games.
      Lab fee $100.
      Fulfills Intermediate Production requirement

    • DMS 462 Game Design

      Pape, D E :: M/W 11-12:50 :: CFA 242
      REG# 22124

      Production course on the design of games, both computer-based and analog.Games are considered as a new art form and in order to create compelling games, students must be aware of the particularities of the form in both structural and aesthetic terms. Clearly the most important difference between games and other art forms are the interactive and interpersonal dynamics of gaming. Core isues of game design; what is a game? what is the nature of play? what makes for good game play? what are the core characteristics and structure of a game? and what are the roles of engagement, narrative, and interactivity in games? Encourages experimental thinking about the boundaries and possibilities of games. Students work in teams to produce a complete game. Thorough, hands-on grounding in the process of game design, including brainstorming, paper prototyping, play-testing, and iterative design. From conception to play-testing, and fosters the skills required to produce, examine, and critique games.

      Lab fee $100.
      Fulfills Intermediate Production requirement

    • DMS 462 Game Design

      Lison :: M/W 11am-12:pm :: CFA 242
      Reg#21017

      Pre Req’s – junior or senior status- Game Design is a production course on the design of games, both computer-based and analog.

      Games are considered as a new art form; in order to create compelling games, students must be aware of the particularities of the form in both structural and aesthetic terms. Clearly the most important difference between games and other art forms are the interactive and interpersonal dynamics of gaming. Core issues of game design: What is a game? What is the nature of play? What makes for good game play? What are the core characteristics and structure of a game? What are the roles of engagement, narrative, and interactivity in games? The course encourages experimental thinking about the boundaries and possibilities of gaming. Students work in teams to produce a complete game via a thorough, hands-on grounding in the process of game design, including brainstorming, paper prototyping, play-testing, and iterative design. From conception to play-testing, it fosters the skills required to produce, examine, and critique games.
 Lab fee $125.

      Fulfills Advanced Production.

    • DMS 462 Game Design

      Pape :: TuTh 11:00AM-12:50PM :: CFA 242
      REG#0219

      Production course on the design of games, both computer-based and analog. We will examine both practical and theoretical aspects of designing a game. Important aspects are how to create something that will be both meaningful and fun to play, and how the rules and other elements of the game affect that. Two things are central to this class: understanding the fundamental formal structures of games, and learning the overall process of designing and developing new games. The course encourages experimental thinking about the boundaries and possibilities of games. Students work in teams to produce a complete game. Thorough, hands-on grounding in the process of game design, including brainstorming, paper prototyping, play-testing, and iterative design. Fosters the skills required to produce, examine, and critique games. Lab fee is $125.
Fulfills Advanced Production.

    • DMS 463 Interactive Fiction

      Anstey, Josephine R :: M/W 1 – 2:50pm :: CFA 242
      REG#23618

      Story has been a driver and colonizer of both literary forms (poetry, drama, the novel) and mass media (print, radio, film, TV, mobile phone, games). This course looks at mainstream and fringe attempts to create fictional and literary experiences in and around computer media. Students will read theoretical texts, analyze work, and experiment with the creation of their own interactive narratives. Lab fee is $100.

      Fulfills Advanced Production or Advanced Analysis Requirement.

    • DMS 463 Interactive Fiction

      Anstey :: MoWe 11:00AM-12:50PM :: CFA 235
      REG#22314

      For about forty years, writer/artists have been using the computer as a media for creating fictional and dramatic experiences. There are many names for this relatively new and rather sprawling and unstable genre – Electronic Literature, Digital Interactive Storytelling, Games, Intermedia Performance, Interactive Narrative, Hypertext, Location-based fiction. Practitioners variously focus on visuals, writing, coding. Delivery systems are flexible and diverse: from mobile phones to art installation to augmented reality. This course focuses on this expanding and morphing territory. Students will read theoretical texts, analyze work, and experiment with the creation of their own fictional and literary experiences in and around computer media.

    • DMS 474 Media Theories & Approaches

      Rhee :: TuTh 2:00PM-3:20PM :: CFA 232
      REG#22334

    • DMS 474 Media Theories and Approaches

      Karppi, Tero Jukka :: M/W 11am – 12:50pm :: CFA 235
      REG# 24102

      Memes, social networks, movies, soundscapes, smartphone interfaces surround our everyday actions. Media theories and approaches is designed to introduce undergraduate students to theoretical ideas and frameworks that can be used as analytical tools for understanding and explaining what happens in and with media. This course gives tools to analyze media texts and images, but it also maps the different and changing relations we have with media from social networks to movies and virtual environments. Focusing on different media theories the course aims at understanding what is media, what kind of relation we as subjects, perceivers and audiences have with media and what are the new media theory questions especially related to computational culture. This course is composed of lectures, reading assignments and different individual and collaborative explorations to media theories and approaches.

      This course will fulfill advanced analysis.

    • DMS 480 Social Media & Networks

      Lison :: T/TH 3-4:50pm :: CFA235
      Reg#23522

      This course will consider the theory of networks from a number of different perspectives, from computer networks to personal networks and the place where they intersect in social media. How do computer networks work? What are the promises and perils of an increasingly networked age? Does the imperative to establish connections paradoxically end up leaving us feeling even more disconnected? How can we understand the new kinds of politics that have developed on both the left and the right in an age of online activism? Students will develop their ability to think critically about the participatory technological networks that we are constantly immersed in.

    • DMS 480 Social Media & Networks

      Lison :: MoWe 10:00AM-11:50AM :: CFA 232
      REG#23743

      This course will consider the theory of networks from a number of different perspectives, from computer networks to personal networks and the place where they intersect in social media. How do computer networks work? What are the promises and perils of an increasingly networked age? Does the imperative to establish connections paradoxically end up leaving us feeling even more disconnected? How can we understand the new kinds of politics that have developed on both the left and the right in an age of online activism? Students will develop their ability to think critically about the participatory technological networks that we are constantly immersed in.

    • DMS 480 Social Media Networks

      staff :: online course
      REG# 22672

      Our life is penetrated by different digital networks and social media systems. We communicate via Facebook or Twitter. Our social life is being organized by these networks. They notify us about events, birthdays and even things we might want to buy. These systems have become so ubiquitous that we hardly notice their existence, except when they fail. Failures, breaks, disconnections make these connections visible in new ways.
      This seminar will investigate different connections and disconnections in media. For example we will map the discourses around Web 2.0 and user participation and examine the ideological and economic principles of social media systems. We will look at things that challenge these user models such as dead Facebook users or online trolls. The course is focused on digital media specific material but not limited to it. In addition to reading assignments the students will do tasks and assignments where they analytically approach the themes of the lecture each week.

      Fulfill Advanced Analysis OR Advanced Theory.

    • DMS 484 Language Media Poetics

      Glazier :: MW 3:00PM – 4:50PM :: CFA 232
      REG# 16877

      This course offers an immersion into language media in literature, performance, film, and digital media, with an emphasis on Beat literature and postmodern poetries. THIS MAY BE ONE OF THE BEST COURSES ON BEAT LITERATURE YOU WILL EVER FIND! The course centers on a variety of literary artists including Kerouac, Ginsberg, Creeley, Olson, Duncan, Burroughs, Bowles, Weiner, Bernstein, Andrews, Howe, Hejinian, Cortez, Bukowski, and Henry Miller, among others. These are writers and writers who explore different levels of literary and artistic explorations, sometimes the seamy underside, sometimes the ecstatic extremes, the visionary, the experimental, the marginalized, the sensory, spiritual, or down-and-out, sometimes the truly avant-garde. Students will undertake readings of texts by these writers, watch films, video, and other documentary resources about/related to them, explore New Media works that extend these experimental practices into the twenty-first century, and hear from current leading authors in the field. We will explore why these writers entered these margins of experience, what can be gained from engaging their illusions, inspirations, and exhaustions, and how these practices might inform what students do with language in their own practice, thinking, and media production. Course will develop student skills on reading/writing in all areas, including critical and creative practices useful to media project production and other creative and scholarly endeavors. These include reflections, responses, creative close reading approaches, and analysis by students, themselves as artists and engaged cultural participants. Whether applying for graduate school, entering the work force, devoting their energies to their own artwork, or simply enriching their undergraduate education, this course offers students, regardless of major, working both in and out of the creative arts a unique opportunity to engage these works. There are NO prerequisites for this class. Course requirements include reading, exams, a film journal, an oral presentation, and a final project. Attendance is crucial. For Media Study majors, this course fulfills advanced analysis or Media Study elective. Course text: TBA.

    • DMS 484 LANGUAGE MEDIA SOCIAL VISION

      Glazier :: M/W 3:00PM – 4:50PM :: CFA232
      REG#23936

      This course examines language, media, and social imagination through great minds of the BEAT GENERATION & AFTER including Allen Ginsberg, Jack Kerouac, William Burroughs, and Charles Bukowski. We will read essential works (e.g., Howl, On the Road, Naked Lunch, and Factotum) and screen films related to this culture-warping generation of outrageous American rebels with special attention to comparing their writings with VARIOUS FILM VERSIONS of their works, from quasi-commercial productions such as On the Road and Barfly to dark ruminations like Cronenberg’s Naked Lunch and the ultra-existential Saharan Sheltering Sky. We will hear the rhythm in the writing, read the word, demystify the play of image on the screen. We will consider how a literary generation can, through media, voice, written word, and image, open new doors to imagination and innovation, and allow us to approach the digital. Attendance and screenings are essential. Required: Class participation, readings, oral presentation, film journal.

      For Media Study majors, this course fulfills advanced analysis or Media Study elective.

    • DMS 484 Language Media Social Vision

      Glazier :: Tuesday,  3 – 6:40pm  :: CFA112
      REG#24056

      This course examines language, media, and social imagination through great minds of the BEAT GENERATION & AFTER including Allen Ginsberg, Jack Kerouac, William Burroughs, and Charles Bukowski. We will read essential works (e.g., Howl, On the Road, Naked Lunch, and Factotum) and screen films related to this culture-warping generation of outrageous American rebels with special attention to comparing their writings with VARIOUS FILM VERSIONS of their works, from quasi-commercial productions such as On the Road and Barfly to dark ruminations like Cronenberg’s Naked Lunch and the ultra-existential Saharan Sheltering Sky. We will hear the rhythm in the writing, read the word, demystify the play of image on the screen. We will consider how a literary generation can, through media, voice, written word, and image, open new doors to imagination and innovation, and allow us to approach the digital. Attendance and screenings are essential. Required: Class participation, readings, oral presentation, film journal.

      This course will fulfill advanced analysis.

    • DMS 484 Language Media Social Vision

      Flatt, Michael :: M 3-6:40 :: CFA 232
      REG# 22492

      When the ground shifts, the next chapter begins. Making things can expand one’s understanding of what it means to be human. […] Finding the vehicles for exploring the edges of your experiences can be a way of transforming thinking into practice. Change is inevitable, adaptation is optional.

      —Jessie Shefrin, “Making Is a Kind of Thinking and Thinking Is a Kind of Making”

      As Shefrin implies, adaptation to change is necessary for survival. Nothing has brought more profound change in contemporary culture than the digital. In this course, students will develop an understanding of these changes. As viewers, users, and readers of contemporary poetic texts in a variety of media, we will attempt to understand how the digital is shaping us—in our use of language and our media habits—and how we can in turn shape the digital. A combination of theory and praxis will help us discover new perspectives and methods for our critical and artistic practices. We will read well known media critics such as Lev Manovich, Katherine Hayles, and Craig Dworkin alongside poets and artists working in the media discussed by these theorists, including HTML, Flash (R.I.P.), PDFs, GIFs, emojis, and musty, dusty old print. We will use the strategies of these artists to bolster our own creative practices, and to explore critical concepts. For Media Study majors, this course fulfills advanced analysis or Media Study elective. Course Prerequisites: None.

      Fulfills Advanced Theory/Advanced Analysis.

    • DMS 486 Media Robotics 2: The Well Behaved Robot

      Bohlen :: T/Th 3 – 4:40pm :: CFA246
      REG#24061

      This undergraduate seminar offers an introduction to robot ethics. We will consider the recent history of robotics and the long history of ethics to ask the how synthetic intelligent systems living amongst us should behave in everyday life. Our goal will be to understand what is required and what is at stake when one intends to make robots not just behave, but behave well. Students will be asked to investigate a robotic system of their choice and to participate in a group design challenge to create a well-behaved robot based on the insights gained in class.

      Lab fee: $125

      This course will fulfill advanced production.

    • DMS 496 (1- 4 CR VARIABLE) MEDIA ARTS INTERNSHIP

      Staff
      REG# Permission of Instructor

      Media Study majors have the opportunity to gain variable academic credit for internships in local and national media production companies, television stations, cable companies, and media access centers. This is an unpaid internship available to majors. Guidelines are set by an internship supervisor in collaboration with a faculty sponsor to provide hands-on practical experience in an on-the-job training program. For registration information, see Elaine Schwartz in 231 CFA.

      Media Study Elective.

    • DMS 499 (1-4 CR VARIABLE) INDEPENDENT STUDY

      Staff
      REG# Permission of Instructor
      Students may arrange for special courses of study with faculty through “Independent Study.” The instructor will set the guidelines for the course on an individual basis. It permits the student to study, independently, in an area where no course is given. Syllabus for Independent Study should be prepared prior to semester, signed by the instructor, with one copy on file with the department. For registration information, see Bradley Hendricks in 231 CFA. Lab fee for production work: $125

      Media Study Elective.

    • DMS 503 Advanced Video Production

      Braemer :: T/Th 9:00AM – 10:50AM :: cfa235
      Reg#23489

      This course will be a production-intensive class focusing on completion of a longer project. We will study and create individualized distribution strategies for video work, screen and discuss a variety of documentary, fiction and experimental work, and, in addition to the longer project, work on a series of short video-sketches as a collective class project.

    • DMS 503 Advanced Video Production

      Conrad :: T 1pm – 4:40pm :: CFA232
      REG#24065

      Lab fee is $125.

    • DMS 510 Advanced Documentary Production

      Elder, Sarah :: T/Th 11:00am – 12:50PM :: CFA 235
      Production REG# 22055
      Theory REG# 22056

      Lab fee is $125.

    • DMS 512 Film and Media Theory

      Shilina-Conte :: T 11:00AM – 2:40PM  :: CFA112
      REG#19823

      This course will guide you through the maze of “pre-” and “post-,” “-isms” and “-ships” in film studies.  We’ll examine theories of realism, formalism, semiotics, psychoanalysis, feminism, structuralism, post-structuralism and cognitive criticism with a particular emphasis on the sensory dimension of the moving image.  Assigned readings for the course will include selections from the writings of Bazin, Eisenstein, Baudry, Metz, Balasz, Gunning, Arnheim, Mulvey, Bordwell, Deleuze, Marks, Sobchack and Shaviro, among others. Following Thomas Elsaesser’s approach to film theory through the senses, and focusing on the role of the spectator in cinema, we will study classical and contemporary film paradigms through the interaction between Moving Image and Senses, Body and Mind, emphasizing such metaphors of filmic experience as Window and Frame, Door and Screen, Mirror and Face. Watching such films as Peeping Tom by Powell, Repulsion by Polanski, Persona by Bergman, Stalker by Tarkovsky, The Hand by Wong Kar Wai, we will not only interpret the way we “see” and “hear” films but also explore them through our senses of touch, smell and even taste. As Elsaesser points out, “film and spectator are like parasite and host, each occupying the other and being in turn occupied.” This unique approach to the confrontation and conflation of mind and body with the screen will open for us new models for knowing and representing the world through film and media.

       

    • DMS 515 Film Narrative

      Colleran :: T 4-7:40pm :: CFA112
      Reg#23525

      This course will examine theories of narrative structure and discuss the potential of film language, particularly editing, to create meaning through different narrative forms. We will compare the structure of films by early innovators such as D. W. Griffith and Sergei Eisenstein, look at a range of realist and formalist theories, and explore avant-garde works that pose critical challenges to the codes created by more classical narrative modes.

    • DMS 515 Media Poetics

      Glazier :: T 1:00PM- 4:40 pm :: CFA 232
      REG#24220

      Visual Media Poetics provides the opportunity to explore the expressive potential of language as a creative material existing on alphabetic, visual, and aural levels, with a focus on visual forms of cultural expression. Visual anthropology will provide a significant lens through which to view visual media and its impact on the cultural milieu. We will take multiple approaches to visual expression, including cultural studies, visual theories, the photographic image, the virtual, representations of the cultural/historic “other”, and sexual/embodied practices, among others The immense value of 20th century experimental literature and innovative film to he student’s own efforts to design or interpret media writing is an additional concern of this course. We will be thinking about the varied possibilities of language as a conjunction of textures, tones, meanings, and media. We will look at media “literature” as a merging of form, image, language, and sound, and we will explore works that successfully produce this extraordinary effect. We will look at works of Concrete, digital, and text poetry and consider these as models for digital media design. We will study theoretical essays and manifestos related to visual media practice, investigating modes and means of visual media expression as seen through a number of documentary and narrative films, including popular and arts films focused on visual imaginations (ranging from Almodovar, Buñuel, and Fellini to new cinema works, with an emphasis on culturally diverse perspectives). Course requirements: Weekly readings (to be announced), an oral presentation, a final project, exams, quizzes, and brief written assignments as necessary. Attendance is crucial.

      Text-TBA

    • DMS 516 Global Media and Culture: Theories of Montage and representation

      Shilina-Conte :: Th 4- 7:40pm :: CFA 112
      Reg#22115

      This class will be structured as a comprehensive overview of the theory and practice of montage and representation in global film and media. Topics for discussion will include staging-in-depth (Bordwell), the Soviet montage school (Eisenstein, Kuleshov, Pudovkin, Vertov), American continuity style, rational and irrational/serial montage (Deleuze), spatiotemporal montage and montage-within-the-shot (Manovich), cinemetrics (Tsivian), QuickTime movies and “memory boxes” (Sobchack), etc. We will trace technological developments in film and digital media that permitted a shift from single frame shots (sequence) to multiple frames, windows and screens (multiplicity). Our special agenda in this class will be to focus on monochrome frames as points of rupture, where they are seen as simultaneously alien and integral to the field of the image. In these cases the cut often functions as both a “scar,” the sign of a filmic cutting/psychic wounding, and a “threshold,” the invisible passage between suppressed history and troubling memory. From these reservoirs of invisible evidence in cinema swarm forth a host of critical issues such as ethnicity, race, sexuality, gender, ethics, trauma and censorship. The topics discussed in this class will help us to understand the connection between cinematic form and content and place mediated representations into social, cultural and historical contexts. Films and excerpts by Sergey Eisenstein, Dziga Vertov, Abel Gance, Jean-Luc Godard, Alain Resnais, Peter Greenaway, Chris Marker, Derek Jarman, Mania Akbari, Su Friedrich and Marlon Riggs  will be considered. This class would be indispensable both for students interested in learning how to interpret film and media critically, as well as students who wish to become better editors/makers of their own films/media.

    • DMS 516 Locative Media and the City

      Rueb, Teri :: M 1 – 4:40 :: CFA 235
      REG# 24254

      The recent convergence of film, video, and sound as delivered via mobile media is explored in this field-based production course that literally takes place on the road. Students and faculty travel together and work in small teams to create mobile media works that engage the interrelationship of media, movement, and geography. Lab fee: $125

    • DMS 516 Sound and Sense

      Rueb :: M 1-4:40pm :: CFA 235
      #24295

       This seminar will be organized around a close reading of philosophers writing on sound and sense.  We will also read and audition the work of sound artists and practitioners who have inquired into the nature of sound and sense through a variety of enactments.  Students will keep media journals–including short listening exercises, writings and sound productions–through which they can explore and reflect upon their everyday sound experiences throughout the semester.  Part seminar, part experimental practice-based research, the course encourages a self-reflexive and performative inquiry into questions regarding the relationship of sound and sense.  Some questions to be considered include:  How has sound been historically understood as one of the (five) senses, how does the naming and categorizing of the senses structure knowledge and ways of knowing, how are hearing and listening related, how do sonic and acoustic metaphors structure consciousness, how do new forms of secondary orality mutually inform ways of knowing and ways of doing, what political implications can we read into an acoustically articulated epistemology?

    • DMS 517 Contemporary Cinema

      Rousssel :: Tuesday 1-4:40 :: CFA 112
      reg# 24362

    • DMS 517 Contemporary Cinema

      Roussel :: W 9:00am – 1:40PM :: CFA 246
      REG# 24063

      The Other appears to us in many forms – parent, sibling, teacher, lover, enemy, friend. One thing is constant, however. No matter what form it takes the Other seems to hold the key to our identity. We live in the paradox that what we are in ourselves is determined by someone who is, well, Other.

      This course examines a number of films and written texts that address this paradox. The films include works by Joseph Lousy, Eric Rohmer, Luis Bunuel and William Wyler among others. The texts include several frown-inducing essays but nothing really overwhelming. Many short written assignments plus a longer essay is required at the end of the semester.

    • DMS 517 On the Road: Media Geographies

       Teri Rueb :: T 1 – 4:40pm :: 232
      reg: 23940

      The recent convergence of film, video, and sound as delivered via mobile media is explored in this field-based production course that literally takes place on the road.  Students and faculty travel together and work in small teams to create mobile media works that engage the interrelationship of media, movement, and geography as they learn about and experience the landscapes, histories, and cultures of Western New York.

      The course begins with short exercises to introduce formal and technical skills and techniques spanning experimental, non-linear, documentary, narrative and non-narrative forms, especially as they relate to locative media and site-specificity.  Students then work individually or in collaboration to develop site-based works and itineraries that critically research and explore issues of place, culture and identity.  For Fall 2014 we will follow a trajectory that takes us to sites of in Western New York, with a special emphasis on “urban wilds” or disturbed landscapes and locations that have been reclaimed by spontaneous and opportunistic processes, both human and non-human.

      Enrollment is open to graduate and undergraduate students.  Students will be responsible for their own travel expenses as they determine sites for their final projects.  Students should be prepared for field-based work in a variety of weather conditions.

      Lab fee: $100

    • DMS 518 Computational media : Machine Learning and Cultural Techniques

      Bohlen, Marc :: W 9am – 12:40pm :: CFA 286
      REG# 24253

      Computational media treats computational systems as cultural objects.
      The focus of the current version of the computational media seminars/workshops is machine learning (ML). The goal of the seminar is twofold: One, to understand important principles of numerical representation and ML and two, to explore the territory of machine learning as a form of critical inquiry commensurate with recent media theory (cultural techniques) that seeks to reposition the role of ‘making’ as a form of knowledge production.

      Machine learning produces software systems that improve themselves over time. ML is a branch of artificial intelligence, and materially responsible for many of the recent spectacular advances in automation that impact everyday life, financial markets, transportation and social media.

      Students will be exposed to fundamentals of supervised and unsupervised ML systems and learn how to ‘train a machine’ on data such that it can reproduce patterns detected in datasets. Study materials will be sourced from various disciplines commensurate with the goal of the course. As the course is geared to humanities and art students, we will make ample use of visualization methods to explore the materials.

      This course will be paced for graduate students without prior exposure to ML, but with exposure to general purpose media arts code development. Our programming environment will be Python with Scikit (http://scikit-learn.org/stable/). Students will be asked to identify and explore a culturally relevant aspect of ML as a semester project.

      Lab Fee: $125

    • DMS 518 Dis/connections in Media Culture

      Karppi :: M/W 1 – 2:50pm :: cfa235
      Reg# 22427

      Our life is penetrated by different digital networks and social media systems. We communicate via Facebook or Twitter. Our social life is being organized by these networks. They notify us about events, birthdays and even things we might want to buy. These systems have become so ubiquitous that we hardly notice their existence, except when they fail. Failures, breaks, disconnections make these connections visible in new ways.
      This seminar will investigate different connections and disconnections in media. For example we will map the discourses around Web 2.0 and user participation and examine the ideological and economic principles of social media systems. We will look at things that challenge these user models such as dead Facebook users or online trolls. The course is focused on digital media specific material but not limited to it. In addition to reading assignments the students will do tasks and assignments where they analytically approach the themes of the lecture each week.
      Students taking this course at 400-level will have an exam at the end of the course and students taking this course at 500-level will do a written essay.

    • DMS 518 Emerging Technologies

      Rhee :: MW 11am-12:50pm :: CFA235
      Reg#22387

      Through a study of machines, this graduate seminar focuses on how technologies emerge, and shape discourses and formations of difference. This course focuses on the study of machines as emerging technologies, with close attention to the process of human-or-machine boundary making, which illustrate the shifting negotiations of citizenship, reality, and identity. Texts include  Minding the Machine by Stephen Price, Sublime Dreams of Living Machines by Minsoo Kang, The Last Slide Projector by Paige Sarlin, and Friedrich Kittler’s Gramophone, Film, and Typewriter. 

    • DMS 525 PhD Seminar 1

      Rueb :: T 5:00 – 8:40PM:: CFA 235
      REG# 22676

      This course surveys a range of research methodologies and strategies to support advanced inquiry at the intersection of media, technology, poetics, art, and design. Particular emphasis is placed on identifying and contextualizing hybrid methods to support practice-based research and creative inquiry. Students are expected to identify and contextualize their individual research and creative inquiry with respect to contemporary and historical discourses, practices and precedents. Through critical review and analysis of their own and other’s practices, including publication and exhibition records, students will gain a deeper understanding of and capacity to evaluate the implications and import of research in their respective professional arenas. Methods surveyed will span qualitative, quantitative, ethnographic and experimental approaches. Preparation of a final term paper is required.
      Group meetings will accommodate discussion, peer review, presentation and community building while individual meetings address the highly individual nature of each student’s research area and methods.

    • DMS 525 PhD Seminar 1

      staff :: M 5 – 8:40pm :: CFA 235
      REG#24061

      This course surveys a range of research methodologies and strategies to support advanced inquiry at the intersection of media, technology, poetics, art, and design.  Particular emphasis is placed on identifying and contextualizing hybrid methods to support practice-based research and creative inquiry.  Through critical review and analysis of their own and other’s practices, publication and exhibition, students will gain a deeper understanding of and capacity to evaluate the implications and import of research in their respective professional arenas.  Methods surveyed will span qualitative, quantitative, ethnographic and experimental approaches.  Preparation of a final term paper is required.

    • DMS 526 PhD Seminar

      Sarlin :: W 4-7:40pm :: CFA232
      Reg#21018

      Phd Seminar 2 is a research seminar designed to answer to the changing needs and demands of academic publishing. The central focus is on writing and publishing academic articles and papers. We will go through each phase of academic publishing from writing abstracts to preparing, reviewing and editing manuscripts in different phases. We will discuss about peer-review process and finding right publication venues and formats. The hard core of this seminar is based on analyzing, commenting and improving the texts of each participant collectively. You can bring texts that are in different phases to the seminar and the goal is that in the end you will have a first complete draft of that paper. You will also have capabilities to review and analyze academic papers. This seminar is targeted especially for doctoral students at the Department of Media Study.

    • DMS 526 Programming Graphics 1

      Pape :: M/W 1 – 2:50pm:: cfa242
      Reg#20010

      This production course will introduce students to the concepts and practice of programming 3D computer graphics and audio using OpenGL and other libraries. The major focus will be on creating interactive art or games experiences by programming both graphics and sound. The course has three goals: to demystify computer code – we get behind the Graphic User Interface to the machine below; to explore the potential of programming – writing our own code means we can create customized computer tools as well as customized visuals; and to teach the fundamentals of graphics programming. Prerequisites are experience in a programming language such as Python, C, C++, or Java (DMS 121, CSE 113/4/5 or equivalent). Lab fee $100. Contact: dave.pape@acm.org

    • DMS 530 Documentary In Expanded Field

      Braemer :: W , 1:00 PM – 4:40 PM :: CFA232
      Reg#23682

      How does documentary practice change in relation to different modes of production and formats for exhibition and distribution? This course will examine the history of documentary studies and practice in light of recent challenges posed to the basic assumptions about image production that takes “the real” as its object.  Topics will include: the proliferation of documentary forms on the Internet, digital technology’s role in the creation of new forms of witnessing and surveillance, shifts in notions of “the real” and medium specificity, the function of documentary guarantees, and the prevalence of documentary forms in the gallery and museums.  New media and documentary theory as well as recent considerations of the cinematic in contemporary art will be central to this course.  Course requirements will include a 10-page mid-term paper and a final project or paper.

    • DMS 530 Media Theory

      Karppi :: M 5 – 8:40pm :: CFA235
      REG#22116

      What is media theory?  This course aims to give an answer to this question by explicating different developments, questions and approaches to media theory as well as elaborating medium specific theory problems. The students will have a strong knowledge on different approaches to media theory and how these theories connect. In specific the student will have theoretical tools to understand three different areas of media theory: 1) general questions of media theory 2) the relation of subject, subjectivity and media and 3) new questions in media theory, especially related to computational media. 
This course is composed of lectures, reading assignments and different individual and collaborative explorations to media theory. The reading assignments are based on original texts from different media theoreticians.

    • DMS 530 New Directions in Cinema

      Waham, Sama :: MW 11am – 12:50pm :: CFA 286
      REG# 24251

      This advanced production course will focus on motion picture production and analysis of experimental forms of the moving image, development of conceptual and technical skills for making individual and collaborative experimental film & video projects.

      Through screenings, workshops and in-class discussions, the course encourages students to break the boundaries of conventional cinema by using inventive storytelling techniques and challenging content, while surveying the history and development of groundbreaking avant-garde film and video from the 1930’s to the present. Students will be encouraged to capture material through a variety of means, and try different ways to process and edit it. Lab fee is $125.

    • DMS 531 Graduate Seminar I

      Conrad :: W 5:00PM – 8:00PM :: CFA 232
      Reg#19058
      Lab Fee – $100

      In this course we will strive for a self-reflective, creative
      setting that allows for critique and well-informed debate of your
      work. We will investigate media art with both, the due euphoria and
      the necessary critical perspective. The course will emphasize the
      professional presentation of work for each respective genre. We will
      focus on framing your artistic vision and your critical discourse,
      articulated through writing projects and iterative critique. As
      preparatory to your thesis work and your continuing practice in the
      field, the course culminates in the second year exhibition.

    • DMS 532 Grad Seminar II

      Elder :: W 5-7:40pm :: CFA235
      Reg#14031

      Graduate Seminar provides a creative setting for critique and discussion of your work. We will develop a roster of readings, viewings, and other material that can encourage an awareness of contemporary works and discourse in our various field areas. There may be short in-class production experiments, which may incorporate performance.

      This course is an introduction to core aspects of the DMS grad program: organizing and writing your thesis abstract, sharing fundamental critical texts, making contact with the full range of Media Study disciplines, and developing a sense of the contemporary media arts field. It will introduce technological, conceptual, and theoretical issues in media practice, with an emphasis on individual development of a research-led methodology.

      Note that regular attendance is mandatory. Lab fee is $125

    • DMS 534 Mobile Apps With HTML5

      Markert :: Th, 1:00 – 4:40 PM :: CFA244
      REG#24275 
      Lab Fee – $100

      Did you ever wish to design an app for your iPhone? Or do you have an idea for the next awesome creative coding experience on the iPad? Do you have a new Android Tablet and want to make something cool with it? This is your chance!
      We will work with the latest cross-platform HTML5 web technologies (mainly the ECMA scripting language, better known as JavaScript; including CSS3) to create applications that will run on your mobile device.

      Participants should already know HTML and CSS; knowing at least one programming language (e.g. Processing) will be most helpful.

      MobileMarkertFall2014 (.pdf)

      Michael Markert is visiting from the Bauhaus University Weimar. Last year he taught a weekend long Mobile Media Workshop at UB and now he is back teaching a semester long Mobile Media seminar. Markert is a media-artist specializing in programming and electronics. He is a member of the Urban Research Institute for Public Art and Urban Ethology. He researches into intuitive musical interfaces and develops, “various interactive sensory devices which he has used for installations and as musical instruments. The focus of his work is exploring cybernetic interaction systems through intuitive and interactive realtime sensory processing thereby overruling hierarchic receptional mechanisms in art.”

    • DMS 535 Script Writing : All Media

      Anstey :: T 11am-2:40PM :: CFA232
      REG#23526

      In this production workshop students will concentrate on writing and editing text/script elements for their media projects. The course will explore both traditional and experimental methods for generating and structuring text for fictional and documentary work. Texts may include original writing, interview material, collaged or found fragments, that will be performed, heard or displayed in the final piece. The texts may be linear, non-linear, interactive, poetic …

      This opportunity to focus on the text is for students at any stage of a project (conception through finishing); in any media (film, video, animation, performance, game, interactive installation); and those working with English as a second language or with translated material. However all students will work through three basic writing stages: creating/generating material; assembling/structuring material; editing/restructuring.

    • DMS 537 New Media 1

      Clark  :: T/TH 3-4:50pm :: CFA246
      Lec REG#22772
      Lab REG#22907

      New Media I is a graduate-level introduction into the design and production of webbased media. Topics will include: web development (HTML5, CSS3, JQuery) understanding web design standards, working with web development software (Adobe Dreamweaver), implementing JQuery, using content management systems (WordPress), and uploading files using FTP Clients.

      Lab Fee is $125

    • DMS 547 Sound Design

      Bouquard :: M/W 1:00PM – 2:50PM :: cfa232
      Reg#21751

      The object of sound design is to explore issues and techniques in the area of sound design and digital audio production. The “visual” media –film and video- are powerfully inflected by their accompanying audio tracks, which frequently convey the work’s preponderant sensibility, or even its core meaning. This course will prepare students technically, conceptually and musically to work with audio. Lab fee $100.

    • DMS 550 Methods of Making II

      Staff :: T/TH  6 – 7:50pm :: CFA 246
      Reg#23938
      Lab Fee – $100

      “This graduate level course will explore the foundation of technical and conceptual skills necessary for advanced study in computational media through a series of intensive short projects focusing on embedded systems and electronics. This course introduces concepts and techniques for creating objects, spaces and media that sense and respond to their physical surroundings and the actions and events that transpire there. Moving beyond the interface paradigm of screen, keyboard and mouse, physical computing enables alternate models for interaction with (and through) computers that afford more subtle and complex relations between a range of human and non-human actors.”

    • DMS 550 Methods Of Making II

      Clark :: F 1 – 4:40pm :: CFA 244
      REG#21225

      This course introduces basic concepts and techniques for designing, constructing, and programming objects, spaces and media that sense and respond to their physical surroundings. Moving beyond the interface paradigm of screen, keyboard and mouse, physical computing enables alternate models for interaction with (and through) computers that afford more subtle and complex relations between a range of human and non-human actors. Combining readings, presentations and discussions on thetheory of computer enabled art forms with a series of hands-on technical workshops in computing methods and techniques, the course provides a critical context for emerging forms of experimental practice. Topics include fundamental ideas in computing (languages, representation of thought), embodied interaction (situated actions, responsive systems), practical aspects of hardware design (electricity, electronics, microprocessors, components, sensors and actuators), and functional programming (variables, datatypes, control structures, functions, objects, communication protocols). No prior expertise in computing required. Curiosity about how things work is a must.

      Lab fee is $125

    • DMS 551 Methods Of Making III

      Clark, Brian :: F 1 – 4:40pm :: CFA 244
      REG# 20064

      Lab fee: $125

    • DMS 555 Green Media

      Anstey :: M/W 11:00AM – 12:50PM  :: CFA235
      REG#23683

      In this course we will investigate how media makers deal with environmental crisis; how environmental discourses use media; and the material connections between media and environment. The course interprets the word media broadly to include not only film, games, social media, mass media and media-art, but also big data, simulation, visualization, modeling, sensing (plus all and any hybrids and mutts). In terms of theory we will look at eco-media issues that unpack questions of the consciousness-raising power of film, media, and journalism;  Marxist and material perspectives that trace the physical impact of our media obsessions; biopolitical questions of human/non-human boundaries; and affect theory driven examinations of eco- optimism, pessimism, gaia-ism, nihilism as the anthropocene draws on.  Students are encouraged to respond to the material with media/art practice  and scholarly writing.

      More Information at: http://josephineanstey.com/wp/?page_id=512

    • DMS 562 Game Design

      Pape, David :: MW 9am-10:50am :: CFA 242
      REG#22502

      Production course on the design of games, both computer-based and analog.Games are considered as a new art form and in order to create compelling games, students must be aware of the particularities of the form in both structural and aesthetic terms. Clearly the most important difference between games and other art forms are the interactive and interpersonal dynamics of gaming. Core issues of game design; what is a game? what is the nature of play? what makes for good game play? what are the core characteristics and structure of a game? and what are the roles of engagement, narrative, and interactivity in games? Encourages experimental thinking about the boundaries and possibilities of games. Students work in teams to produce a complete game. Thorough, hands-on grounding in the process of game design, including brainstorming, paper prototyping, play-testing, and iterative design. From conception to play-testing, and fosters the skills required to produce, examine, and critique games.
      Lab fee $125.

    • DMS 562 Game Design

      Lison :: M/W 11:00AM – 12:50PM :: CFA 242
      Reg#21019

      Game Design is a production course on the design of games, both computer-based and analog. Games are considered as a new art form; in order to create compelling games, students must be aware of the particularities of the form in both structural and aesthetic terms. Clearly the most important difference between games and other art forms are the interactive and interpersonal dynamics of gaming. Core issues of game design: What is a game? What is the nature of play? What makes for good game play? What are the core characteristics and structure of a game? What are the roles of engagement, narrative, and interactivity in games? The course encourages experimental thinking about the boundaries and possibilities of gaming. Students work in teams to produce a complete game via a thorough, hands-on grounding in the process of game design, including brainstorming, paper prototyping, play-testing, and iterative design. From conception to play-testing, it fosters the skills required to produce, examine, and critique games.
 Lab fee $125.

    • DMS 570 Media Theory

      Roussel :: W 5 – 8:40pm  :: CFA235
      REG#22682

      What is media theory? This course aims to give an answer to this question by explicating different developments, questions and approaches to media theory, The course is focused on the close reading of important texts by important media theorists. The aim is to give an overview of different developments, questions and approaches to media theory that is at the same time grounded in your familiarity with specific works.

      Learning outcomes:
      The students will have an understanding of different approaches to media theory and how these theories connect. The student will be able to locate her/his thesis or dissertation project in a sophisticated historical and theoretical context.

    • DMS 580 Methods Of Making 1

      Bouquard :: F 9am-12:40pm :: CFA286
      Reg#22390

      This graduate level course explores the media of film, video, and audio through a series of short projects geared toward providing an overview of production methods and establishing a basic proficiency in the ever-changing field of media production. Improvement of technical skills is emphasized and creativity encouraged. Primarily aimed at incoming Media Study MFA students, the course also offers an introduction to the array of equipment and facilities available in the Media Study Department. Students are given specific, hands-on instruction in production, post-production and distribution. A lab fee of $125 is assessed for this course.
.

    • DMS 580 Methods of Making I

      Staff :: F 1 – 4:40 :: cfa286
      Reg#24086
      Lab fee – $100

      This graduate level course explores the media of film, video, and audio through a series of short projects geared toward providing an overview of production methods and establishing a basic proficiency in the ever-changing field of media production. Improvement of technical skills is emphasized and creativity encouraged. Primarily aimed at incoming Media Study MFA students, the course also offers an introduction to the array of equipment and facilities available in the Media Study Department. Students are given specific, hands-on instruction in production, post-production and distribution. A lab fee of $100 is assessed for this course.

      .

    • DMS 580 Methods of Making I

      Bouquard, Michael :: F 9am – 12:40pm :: CFA 286
      REG# 24256

    • DMS 602 Environmental Justice Issues

      staff :: M W , 3:00 PM – 4:50 PM :: Cfa 286
      Reg#23685

      My choice to teach a seminar on environmental justice in Israel/Palestine—and not a seminar on security, terrorism, or borders in this region—is deliberate. Although rarely highlighted by the international media and seemingly marginal in comparison to the life and death stakes of many of the more typical issues the media reports on, environmental justice issues—those issues concerning land, water, air, forestation, wildlife, et cetera—are in fact central to the Israeli/Palestinian conflict. For example:
      Whereas Israelis enjoy an unlimited supply of running water all year round, Palestinians are allotted a small fixed amount, resulting in constant water shortages. . . . Consequently, residents must deal with lengthy intervals in which they receive no water whatsoever (http://www.btselem.org/water, last updated 2014).
      This seminar will study the legal and regulatory frameworks concerning environmental issues in Israel/Palestine. Specifically, we will discuss land regimes (urban planning, Jewish National Fund’s afforestation practices, Bedouin settlement in the Negev, Jewish Israeli settlement in the occupied Palestinian territories, olive trees), borders and the Separation Wall, the Dead Sea, hunting, nature reserves, and coral reef management in the Red Sea.

    • DMS 603 Innovative Approaches to Moving Image & Video-Storytelling

      staff :: MW 3-4:50 :: CFA286
      REG#25012

      An advanced production course which focuses on the learning, comprehension and creation of new unconventional narrative, fiction and non-fiction hybrid moving image. This hands-on studio course explores the meaning and methods of innovative film/video techniques, as utilized by contemporary artists working across a variety of genres. Through screening excerpts, in-class discussions, workshops, assignments and projects; students will master basic technical concerns in lighting, cinematography, sound and montage and will investigate a broad range of production and post-production techniques while exploring the practice and theories of films and filmmakers that challenge dominant commercial storytelling.

    • DMS 603 PLASMA

      Glazier :: M 5-9pm :: CFA 112
      REG#22040

      Performances, Lectures, and Screenings in Media Art (PLASMA) is a course in which students are exposed to contemporary practices and discourses in media art and culture. Beyond the model of a lecture series course, PLASMA engages students in performative, field-based and workshop encounters with professional practitioners operating at national and international levels of visibility. Roughly every other week brings a guest to the course, with alternating weeks providing an opportunity for screenings, critical reflection and discussion. Readings are assigned to complement topics addressed in the work of guest practitioners, including publications of their own, where relevant. The course is part of the undergraduate foundations sequence in Media Study, but is also open to graduate students who meet in a graduate only section to discuss graduate implications of the course content and to explore further concepts and practices.

    • DMS 603 PLASMA

      Waham/Rhee :: M 5-8:40pm :: CFA235
      Reg#19992

      Performances, Lectures, and Screenings in Media Art (PLASMA) is a course in which students are exposed to contemporary practices and discourses in media art and culture. Beyond the model of a lecture series course, PLASMA engages students in performative, field-based and workshop encounters with professional practitioners operating at national and international levels of visibility. Roughly every other week brings a guest to the course, with alternating weeks providing an opportunity for screenings, critical reflection and discussion. Readings are assigned to complement topics addressed in the work of guest practitioners, including publications of their own, where relevant. The course is part of the undergraduate foundations sequence in Media Study, but is also open to graduate students who meet in a graduate only section to discuss graduate implications of the course content and to explore further concepts and practices.

    • DMS 605 Full Scale Computational Media

      Bohlen :: T/Th 11am-12:50pm :: CFA246
      REG#22458

      This is a course in ‘advanced project development’ in the realm of computational media. The course will have three distinct components: iterative concept design, skills workshops and project realization. The goal of the class is the end to end realization of a powerful media-enabled artwork conceived for a specific context. Results from the class will be presented to the public in a show or special event.

      Prerequisites: graduate standing, prior exposure to computational media, programming experience

    • DMS 605 Media Architecture Studio: Lab

      Shepard :: T/Th 1:30-7:30pm :: Crosby
      REG#19966

    • DMS 605 Media Architecture Studio: Networked Ecologies

      Lab
      Shepard :: T 1:30PM – 5:30PM :: South Campus TBA

      REG#22204

      This transdisciplinary studio will provide a critical context for experimental practice engaging contemporary networked ecologies. Addressing entanglements of human, natural and artificial systems, the studio will investigate how these assemblages can be influenced, shaped and mediated by a variety of media and material interventions. Emphasis will be placed on the role of distributed sensing and computation, big data and open systems, social media and other participatory platforms in aggregating small-scale, local interactions into larger organizations exhibiting network effects at urban and regional scales.

      The studio consists of two linked courses: a seminar (DMS 611) structured as an open framework for critique and discussion of ongoing research and experimentation conducted by members of the studio, combined with a lab (DMS 605) providing focused instruction in the concepts, tools and techniques relevant to programming networked media environments. Joint registration for the seminar and lab is encouraged, but not required.

      This studio is open to students from the departments of Media Study and Architecture at UB, together with students visiting from the Bauhaus-Universität Weimar, Germany within the framework of the new International Media Architecture Masters Studies (IMAMS) program. Additionally, the studio will participate in a week-long workshop as part of the international Media Architecture exchange (iMAE), a collaboration exploring the changing nature of learning at the university level through networked and distributed knowledge exchanges between the University at Buffalo, the Bauhaus Universitat Wiemar, and Plymouth University, UK.

    • DMS 605 Media Theory Poetics: readings

      Glazier :: T 1 – 4:40PM :: cfa232
      Reg#23498

      Media Theory Poetics: Close Readings provides graduate level emphasis in contemporary media theory where, over the course of the semester, we CLOSE READ select texts in contemporary media theory. (“Poetics” here does not refer to “poetry” in any direct way but to “poiesis”, theories of “making” as in “making” in media.) Fundamentally, what is addressed, piece by piece and in a cumulative manner, is how a canon — your own media theory canon — can be constituted. Clearly, no single master list can ever serve everyone. The course provides ONE tactic among many in an attempt to reveal the keys to creating an approach to theory, to personal canon building, to creating a theoretical environment that situates your making within a research context. “CLOSE READING” here means taking selected texts, one by one, investigating what really is said, how it is articulated in language, and deliberating what it might mean conceptually. Through this process, our aim is to read material that is at the center of media theory (or, more accurately, at one of its many expressive peripheries) as readers, as writers (of theses, articles, and dissertations), and as participants in a shared, communal conversation. The “poetics” in this process is to read texts in a manner that we investigate theoretical writing as literature itself: it text itself but it also sets into motion mechanisms suggesting ideas beyond literal description. Since one of the seminar’s emphases is on current and recently issued works (in addition to foundational works in the field), seminar texts will be announced shortly before the beginning of the semester. Graduate level emphasis includes works by theorists such as Ian Bogost, Craig Dworkin, Vilém Flusser, N. Katherine Hayles, Matthew Kirschenbaum, Friedrich Kittler, Marjorie Perloff, and Michel Serres, among many others. Other texts within range and resonance of our reading include those by Alexander Galloway, Jonathan Crary, Gabriel de Tarde, Tony Sampson, Gilbert Simondon, etc. Seminar work includes careful reading of a small number of texts (usually three per semester), informal presentations of specific chapters with handouts, occasional artists/reader statements on topics, plus work (with seminar feedback) on an individual student project.

    • DMS 605 Research Seminar

      Karppi, Tero Jukka :: w 3 – 6:40pm :: CFA 235
      REG#24101

      This Research Seminar is designed to answer to the changing needs and demands of academic publishing. The central focus is on writing and publishing academic articles and papers. We will go through each phase of academic publishing from writing abstracts to preparing, reviewing and editing manuscripts in different phases. We will discuss about peer-review process and finding right publication venues and formats. The hard core of this seminar is based on analyzing, commenting and improving the texts of each participant collectively. You can bring texts that are in different phases to the seminar and the goal is that in the end you will have a first complete draft of that paper. You will also have capabilities to review and analyze academic papers. This seminar is targeted especially for Doctoral Students with variable 1-4 credit hours. MFAs who are in final phases of their research and are planning to publish their work can apply by contacting Tero Karppi directly.Karppi, Tero Jukka

    • DMS 606 Breaking Down “Breaking Bad”

      Jackson :: M 12:30-3  ::  610 Clemens
      REG#24306

      “Breaking Bad” was one of the most spectacular narrative achievements in television. Its five seasons comprised some 60 hours of a single narrative arc, something no film or television program (cable or commercial) has ever accomplished. The original version of Erich von Stroheim’s Greed was a mere 8 hours; read aloud, The Iliad takes about 12 hours and War and Peace 24 hours “Breaking Bad” is one of the great epics. The acting, writing, cinematography, editing, scoring and settings were all masterful (the show won major awards in all categories). It was a story made for television (though it was shot on film), not the big screen; some of the work would have been handled differently had it been done for a theater audience. It has already had a continuing cultural influence: the New York City based One World Symphony, for example, is developing an opera based on the “Ozymandias” episode in the final season.

      In this seminar, we’ll take a close look at all the components of the series; we’ll talk about what was done, how it was done, why it worked. There is one prerequisite: that members of the seminar have seen the series before the seminar’s first meeting. We’re going to be studying it, not greeting it. We’ll look at some segments during the semester, but only so we can deconstruct the work. I’ll expect participants to do class presentations on different aspects of the epic, and a term paper on a topic of their choice.

      My own qualifications for, and interest in, the story of Walter White are threefold: I’ve made films, I’ve written extensively about narrative, and I was senior consultant on the field segment of the drug report for the President’s Commission on Law Enforcement and Administration of Justice (usually called “The President’s Crime Commission”), which gave me the opportunity to spend a lot of time on the ground with people on both sides of the kind of action depicted in “Breaking Bad.”

    • DMS 606 Code and Space

      Shepard :: TH 10am – 12:40pm :: TBA
      Reg#25026

      As software is woven into the spatial fabric of everyday life, new challenges and opportunities emerge for the design of the built environment. Over the past few decades, computer code has played an increasing role in the production and disposition of space. Code now generates, configures, modulates, conditions, governs, regulates, and activates a wide variety of spaces through which we move on a daily basis. At the same time, the decreasing cost of lower-power microcontrollers and wireless sensor networks, coupled with the proliferation of open source software and hardware initiatives, has brought the design and fabrication of objects, spaces and media that are responsive to their environments to ever-broader communities of architects, artists and designers. Taken together, these conditions present multiple vectors for critical inquiry into the material, formal, social and political dimensions of contemporary architectural practice.

      This design research workshop investigates this interweaving of code and space within the built environment through project-based experimentation. It introduces basic concepts and techniques for creating objects, spaces and media that sense and respond to their physical surroundings and the actions and events that transpire there. We will investigate models for spatial interactions with (and through) computers that afford more subtle and complex relations between a range of human and non-human actors. Combining readings, presentations and discussions on the theory of responsive environments in architecture, art and design with a series of hands-on technical workshops in computing methods and techniques, the course provides a critical context for emerging forms of experimental architecture.

      Topics include fundamental ideas in computing (languages, representations of thought and world), embodied interaction (situated actions, responsive systems), practical aspects of hardware design (electricity, electronics, microprocessors, components, sensors and actuators), functional programming (variables, data types, control structures, functions, objects) and basic networking principles (topologies, protocols). This is an introductory course. No prior expertise in computing required. Curiosity about how things work is a must.

    • DMS 606 Documentary Praxis

      <strong>Jackson :: M 3:30-6:10pm :: Clemen 610
      REG#24069</strong>

    • DMS 606 Media Architecture Studio: Seminar

      Shepard :: T/Th 1:30-7:30pm :: Crosby
      REG#18899

    • DMS 606 Sound and Space

      Geistweiidt :: Th 9-11:40am :: Crosby 201
      Reg#23527

      This course examines sound as the primary material for creative exploration, critical reflection, and aesthetic contemplation. The physical and psychological properties of sound are introduced as well as techniques and methodologies for capturing, manipulating, and presenting sound in space. Students conduct both field and studio recordings; construct microphones, singing circuits, and instruments; create audio to complement other media; and utilize open source software to manipulate sound and create performance systems. Readings from Russolo, Cage, Schaeffer, Adorno, M. Schafer, Chion, Oliveros, and others prompt discussions of silence, noise, music, acoustic ecology, sound field, and performance. Students maintain a listening journal and create sonic vignettes based upon the week’s topic. These reflections and mini-compositions serve as a source for a collaborative sonic ‘happening’ at the end of term.

    • DMS 607 Critical Media Practice

      Rueb :: T 1:00PM – 4:00PM :: cfa244
      Reg#24283

      *3 Credit Course*

      This course explores the potential of critical media practice to initiate and sustain public debate and dialogue around current issues, with the intent of leading to more informed positions from which broad publics may participate in policy and decision making. Working in the domain of critical design and media practice, students will collaborate on media projects that inspire, inform and motivate civic participation in debate and action through political process.

    • DMS 611 Media Architecture Studio: Networked Ecologies

      Seminar
      Shepard :: Th 1:30 – 4:30PM :: South Campus TBA
      REG#20587

      This transdisciplinary studio will provide a critical context for experimental practice engaging contemporary networked ecologies. Addressing entanglements of human, natural and artificial systems, the studio will investigate how these assemblages can be influenced, shaped and mediated by a variety of media and material interventions. Emphasis will be placed on the role of distributed sensing and computation, big data and open systems, social media and other participatory platforms in aggregating small-scale, local interactions into larger organizations exhibiting network effects at urban and regional scales.

      The studio consists of two linked courses: a seminar (DMS 611) structured as an open framework for critique and discussion of ongoing research and experimentation conducted by members of the studio, combined with a lab (DMS 605) providing focused instruction in the concepts, tools and techniques relevant to programming networked media environments. Joint registration for the seminar and lab is encouraged, but not required.

      This studio is open to students from the departments of Media Study and Architecture at UB, together with students visiting from the Bauhaus-Universität Weimar, Germany within the framework of the new International Media Architecture Masters Studies (IMAMS) program. Additionally, the studio will participate in a week-long workshop as part of the international Media Architecture exchange (iMAE), a collaboration exploring the changing nature of learning at the university level through networked and distributed knowledge exchanges between the University at Buffalo, the Bauhaus Universitat Wiemar, and Plymouth University, UK.

    • ENG 441 Contemporary Cinema

      Shilina-Conte :: W 5:00PM – 7:40PM :: CFA 112
      Reg# 17611

      This course will be structured around the contemporary cutting-edge paradigm of the theory of the senses in film studies. Cinema is traditionally regarded as an audio-visual medium, but in our course we will transgress the borders of this bilateral definition, aiming at a multisensory or “embodied experience of cinema” (Laura Marks). In this class we will interpret not only the ways we “see” and “hear” films, but also explore them through our senses of touch, smell and even taste. As Thomas Elsaesser points out, “film and spectator are like parasite and host, each occupying the other and being in turn occupied.” This synesthetic experience and unique approach of confrontation and conflation with the screen through our Mind, Body and Senses will open for us new modes of knowing and representing the world through film and media. It will help us to cultivate a deeper appreciation of cinema as an art form, and discover the “hidden senses” (both literally and metaphorically). The class will also give you an opportunity to learn more about yourself in terms of engaging your mind and spirit in ways that you haven’t thought of before. The assigned readings will include excerpts and articles by Linda Williams, Laura Marks, Vivian Sobchack, Jennifer Barker, Hamid Naficy, Thomas Elsaesser, Elena del Rio and others. By definition, exploration of taste and smell will include screenings and discussions of food in the movies. We will sample different cuisines around the world:  Babette’s Feast by Axel (French), Eat Drink Man Woman by Ang Lee (Chinese), Tampopo by Itami (Japanese, and the first “noodle western”), Big Night by Scott and Tucci (Italian), Like Water for Chocolate by Arau (Mexican), and Chocolat by  Hallstrom (for dessert), which will provide us a lot of “food for thought.” Make sure you eat before you come to class!