Summer 2012

DMS 101 BASIC FILMMAKING
Session J
Scime
reg# 12512
This course is intended to provide a basic introduction to 16mm film production. Classes will include screenings, lectures, and demonstrations. Students will learn basic camera operation, lighting, editing, and sound acquisition. In addition, the course will explore the critical relationship between theory and practice in the context of film production. Students will be required to complete collaborative class projects, individual assignments, and a critical paper. Each student will also be required to complete a short, non-sync, 16mm film project. Class materials will cost approx. $150. Lab fee: $100. Class size is strictly limited. Fulfills Basic Production Requirement.

DMS 103 BASIC VIDEO
Session J
Cathleen Grado
reg# 12041

This course is a basic introduction to the tools and techniques of video production. Students will become familiar with using video and develop strategies for its application as an alternative medium of communication. Crucial to this project is the concurrent development of a critical perspective on mainstream media culture. Video art screenings and readings in media theory will critically address the relations between viewers, producers, and the media. Students must expect to acquire materials and texts costing approx. $50.00 to be used in exercises in classroom presentations. Access to equipment and editing facilities will be available. Lab fee: $100. Class size is strictly limited. Fulfills Basic Production Requirement.

DMS 103SEM J BASIC VIDEO
Staff :: MW 9:00AM/12:40PM :: CFA 278
REG#12386

This course is a basic introduction to the tools and techniques of video production. Students will become familiar with using video and develop strategies for its application as an alternative medium of communication. Crucial to this project is the concurrent development of a critical perspective on mainstream media culture. Video art screenings and readings in media theory will critically address the relations between viewers, producers, and the media. Students must expect to acquire materials and texts costing approx. $50.00 to be used in exercises in classroom presentations. Access to equipment and editing facilities will be available. Lab fee: $100. Class size is strictly limited. Fulfills Basic Production Requirement.

DMS 108 FILM HISTORY
Session M
Roussel :: Online Course
reg# 10316

This course is a survey of significant films produced between 1945 through the late 1970′s. Movements/films will include post -WWII US [Wyler’s The Best Years of Our Lives], Italian Neo-Realism [DeSica’s Bicycle Thief], French New Wave [ Godard’s Masculine/Feminine] as well as a selection of filmmakers from the 1960′s and 70′s including Fellini, Bergman, etc. Since this was not only a productive time for film but for film theory as well I include important critical works that provide a context for these films.
This is an on-line course. Students are expected to access these films on their own. Where possible, I’ve chosen films that stream on Netflix but this is just a suggestion. Beyond viewing of the films themselves, the critical readings will be provided to students through the course website. In addition there will be regular chat room meetings, a course blog. Assignments include short essays on the films, regular responses to the critical readings and a final. Fulfills Introduction to Analysis requirement.

DMS 110 INTRO PROGRAMMING (GAME PROGRAMMING)
session j
Dave Pape
reg # 12502

Beginner programming course geared towards Media Study majors with little to no experience who want to pursue Programming Graphics, Game Design and Virtual Reality. This course introduces basic concepts of Computer Science with the Python programming language, while incorporating a Media Study perspective. Non Majors welcome if space available. Lab fee: $100. Fulfills Basic Production Requirement.

DMS 121 BASIC DIGITAL ARTS
Session J
Sargent :: CFA 244
reg# 12088

This course will present fundamental concepts and methods that underlie the use of computers in generating and processing digital works and examine them in the context of contemporary artistic practice in painting, photography, film, and video. The impact of computers, both present and potential, on the more traditional arts will be discussed. Through the use of imaging audio and presentation software, students will explore the various ways in which computers deal with images, sound and structures, adapting these methods to produce work of their own. Work by contemporary artists working in the digital medium will be shown and examined on a regular basis. The class size is strictly limited. Lab fee: $100. Fulfills Basic Production Requirement.

DMS 213 IMMIGRATION & FILM
Session J
Waxman :: Online Course
reg# 12501

By looking at representative examples of American and foreign films, this course will critically examine the role of cinema in the construction and exploration of the figure of the racial, ethnic, cultural and social theory. Our topics will include (1) racial, ethnic and cultural identity and its reciprocal relationship with cinema, (2) the notion of realism in relation to the representation of race and ethnicity in film, (3) the cinematic representation of inter-ethnic and intra-ethnic conflict, (4) the position of cinema in the debate between assimilation and multiculturalism. Films will be screened in class and discussed against the background of focused critical readings. The aim of the course is to provide you with an opportunity to develop your critical thinking and writing abilities through class discussions, close readings of films and critical literature, and writing assignments. Fulfills the American Pluralism requirement or Media and Culture or Media Study Elective

DMS 213 IMMIGRATION & FILM
Session J
Fink :: CFA 235
reg# 10498

By looking at representative examples of American and foreign films, this course will critically examine the role of cinema in the construction and exploration of the figure of the racial, ethnic, cultural and social theory. Our topics will include (1) racial, ethnic and cultural identity and its reciprocal relationship with cinema, (2) the notion of realism in relation to the representation of race and ethnicity in film, (3) the cinematic representation of inter-ethnic and intra-ethnic conflict, (4) the position of cinema in the debate between assimilation and multiculturalism. Films will be screened in class and discussed against the background of focused critical readings. The aim of the course is to provide you with an opportunity to develop your critical thinking and writing abilities through class discussions, close readings of films and critical literature, and writing assignments. Fulfills the American Pluralism requirement or Media and Culture or Media Study Elective.

DMS 213 IMMIGRATION & FILM
Session M
Jaramillo :: Online Course
reg# 12040

By looking at representative examples of American and foreign films, this course will critically examine the role of cinema in the construction and exploration of the figure of the racial, ethnic, cultural and social theory. Our topics will include (1) racial, ethnic and cultural identity and its reciprocal relationship with cinema, (2) the notion of realism in relation to the representation of race and ethnicity in film, (3) the cinematic representation of inter-ethnic and intra-ethnic conflict, (4) the position of cinema in the debate between assimilation and multiculturalism. Films will be screened in class and discussed against the background of focused critical readings. The aim of the course is to provide you with an opportunity to develop your critical thinking and writing abilities through class discussions, close readings of films and critical literature, and writing assignments. Fulfills the American Pluralism requirement or Media and Culture or Media Study Elective

DMS 215 PORTFOLIO PRODUCTION
Session J
Flyntz :: CFA 232
reg# 11248

This course is geared toward incoming transfer students and current UB students who have taken at least two basic production courses and intend to become Media Student majors in the Production Concentration. Work with the instructor to produce intermediate level work that integrates conceptual ideas with technical ability. Student who are eligible may submit to a portfolio review that will take place prior to the beginning of the Fall 2011 semester. $100 Lab fee.

DMS 231 3D MODELING
Session J
Baumgaertner :: CFA 242
reg# 12039

This course is designed to provide students with an understanding of how to make 3D models for “real time” programs like games and simulations. Students will utilize Autodesk Maya as well as Adobe Photoshop to make models and other assets from scratch for their own unique creations. The topics taught in this class include low polygon modeling, photography, texture creation, and material creation. Additional material will be taught using Turtle for texture baking and surface transferring. Enrolling students should come to the first class with a sketch pad (unlined) which can be purchased at the student bookstore. $100 lab fee. Fulfills non “*” intermediate production requirement or can be used as an elective.

DMS 259 INTRO TO MEDIA ANALYSIS
Session M
James :: Online Course
reg# 12038

Provides students with a theoretical and historical grounding in analyzing the media and visual revolution of the 20th century. Encourages students to experiment with various media codes in their final exam projects in which they combine technical skills with analytical and critical thinking.

DMS 315 VIDEO AND SOUND DESIGN
Session J
Bouquard :: :: CFA 278
reg# 11202

Prereqs: DMS 103 or 105 and Portfolio.
In this course, students will explore and experiment with the video medium through a series of short exercises. Improvement of technical knowledge and skills will be emphasized, and creativity encouraged. Topics to be explored will include: video camera, advanced shooting techniques, sound gathering techniques, microphone placement and selection, non-linear sound editing, lighting techniques for studio and location, non-linear editing. Students learn properties of audio, video and still assets, and practice importing, logging, and insert assembly editing. They also develop a sensitivity to the unique aesthetic and usability criteria of digital video in application environments. Fulfills * Intermediate Production requirement.

DMS 401 ADVANCED CINEMATOGRAPHY
Lee
Reg# 12514

T/TH 1-4:40, Session I, May 21-June 29
This advanced-level class will focus on further developing visual approaches to moving image production in digital video and 16mm. Composition and lighting concepts will be emphasized through lectures and discussions, in-class exercises, weekly assignments, and a final project. Students must have successfully completed an intermediate-level production class and Basic Film. Lab fee: $100

DMS 415 SOCIAL MEDIA AND THE NEWS CYCLE
Session J
Khilji :: Online Course
reg#12497

This class attempts to analyze the connection between today’s news cycle and social media. What does the age of Twitter, Facebook, YouTube, cellphone cameras and blogs mean for the field of journalism? Is there something to be learned from Web 2.0 or is it something to be shunned and feared? What is the place of traditional journalism? Is it to adapt, or push harder to hold on to its strengths?

The course will have several readings each week and students will be expected to participate in a discussion board about the readings. They will also be required to report on a current news story each week… both in the form of a blog and a more traditional approach (a written or video piece). The course culminates in a final project/paper exploring some of the topics covered.

DMS 417 FOOD AND EMERGING MEDIA
Session J
Bardin :: Online Course
reg#11190

A course dedicated to exploring the role of emerging media and new technology on the exploration and articulation of topics focussing on the many facets of food. We will be looking at artists who utilize technology to explore and in many cases expose issues within our tightly veiled food production systems. These artists include /The Critical Art Ensemble/ and their “Free Range Grains”/ / project which explores the topic of genetically modified food, /The Yes Men/ and their piece “Re-burger” which addresses issues of starvation in third world countries and the/ //Future Farmers/ who create work that challenge current social, political and economic systems. The course will also focus on issues of /Sustainablity/ and artists who are currently using their practice to explore ways of improving upon food production and distribution models. We will also be looking at the ways chefs, academics and independent acolytes use the Internet to publicize their work, writings and interests and how this medium has influenced the gastronomic landscape. These platforms include the /Association for the Study of Food and Society/ (ASFS) listserv, MIT’s /Counter Intelligence Group/ which focuses on technological approaches to functional, cognitive, and social support in the home and sites like /Ideas in Food/ where Aki Kamozawa and H. Alexander Talbot write in detail on their experiments in flavor and composition. Through a rigorous practice of watching, investigating, talking and writing about artists, chefs, culinary scholars and DIY individuals who utilize media in their discussion, research, profession and practice of food related endeavors, students will gain insight into how these emerging technologies and artistic practices influence the realm of gastronomy as well as the food we eat.Fulfills Advanced Analysis or Media Study Elective

DMS 418 / DMS 518 ON THE ROAD: MEDIA GEOGRAPHIES
Summer 2012
Session M July 26 – August 10
Rueb / Lavenstein
reg# 12500

“A traveler! I love his title. A traveler is to be reverenced as such. His profession is the best symbol of our life. Going from ___ toward ___; it is the history of every one of us.” — “Summer” (Henry David Thoreau)

The recent convergence of film, video, and sound as delivered via mobile media is explored in this field-based production course that literally takes place on the road. Students and faculty travel together and work in small teams to create mobile media works that engage the interrelationship of media, movement, and geography as they learn about and experience the landscapes, histories, and cultures of the United States and Canada.

The course begins with a two-day workshop in Buffalo which includes short exercises to introduce formal and technical skills and techniques spanning experimental, non-linear, documentary, narrative and non-narrative forms, especially as they relate to locative media, film/video and site-specificity. Students then break into 3-5 teams to follow separate itineraries as they create works that explore their experiences of place and people. Each year a unique itinerary will be determined based on faculty interest and student enrollment.

For Summer 2012 we will follow a trajectory that takes us to sites of significance in the writings of Henry David Thoreau. Using the texts “Walking,” “A Yankee in Canada,” “The Maine Woods,” and “Cape Cod” as spring boards for our inquiry into itinerant art forms, we will travel by foot, railway, boat and car throughout the territory defined in the Champlain maps that so impressed Thoreau. One such map sketched by Thoreau extends from the Great Lakes to Quebec, Maine and down to Massachusetts. Accordingly, we will travel from Buffalo to Montreal, Quebec City, Maine (where students may optionally choose to climb Mount Katahdin) and finally to Cape Cod and Walden Pond in Massachusetts.

Enrollment is open to graduate and undergraduate students. Students will be responsible for travel expenses, which will run approximately $800-$1000 per student (transportation and lodging) + meals. In addition to hostelling, we will camp at points along the way, so students should be prepared to bring and/or pool their equipment. Advance registration is recommended.

Lab Fee is $100

Instructors:
Teri Rueb
http://www.terirueb.net

Hollie Lavenstein

http://www.cla.auburn.edu/cmjn/people/faculty/hollie-lavenstein

DMS 435 NARRATIVE SCRIPTWRITING
Session X
Reissman
reg# 12072
_FROM CONCEPT TO COMPLETION:How to develop a screenplay._

This intensive summer course will explore development of feature films
and the steps involved in transforming an idea to a screenplay.We will
assess story ideas and their origination: will discuss character, theme,
structure, plot.We will explore the use of log lines, treatments and
script coverage, pitching and collaboration.The course structure will be
comprised of exercises, lectures, and screenings. The daily schedule is
subject to change.

DMS 455 B MOVIES
Session M
Kolberg :: Online Course
Reg#12036

Beginning with the B-Movie’s origins in the 1930′s this course will explore the history and evolution of the B-Mov.
The postwar science fiction boom of the 50′s gave rise to some of the B’s most popular movies: “Them!,” “Earth vs the Spider,” “The Amazing Colossal Man,” “I Married a Monster from Outer Space,” “The Brain that Wouldn’t Die,” “The Attack of the Killer Shrews,” “Attack of the Crab Monsters,” and “Tarantula” to name just a few.
We will look at the ways that these movies embody the symbolic representations of Cold War anxieties: communist infiltration; nuclear disaster; and worries about new developments in science and technology. Other interpretations read these films as a Freudian expression of the id: the external embodiment of our darkest unconscious drives and desires.
We will look at the B-movie aesthetic, including how the low budgets heightened the directors’ creativity and gave them the freedom to experiment, with both fabulous and disastrous results. We will explore what it is that makes these films “so bad they’re good” and examine why some of these films are simply terrible, while others have become cult classics.
Along the way we will watch a variety of B-Movies, such as “Robot Monster,” “Forbidden Planet,” “The Wasp Woman,” and what many have called the worst movie ever made, the cult classic “Plan 9 from Outer Space.”
Course expectations include regular participation in on-line discussions, readings, short written responses to the readings, and a short critical paper. Popcorn is optional, but recommended.
The films will be readily available through Netflix and/or public libraries.