Spring 2017

DMS 103 Basic Video
staff :: MW 3-4:50 :: CFA 286
REG# 22444

This course is a basic introduction to the tools and techniques of video production. Students will become familiar with using video and develop strategies for its application as an alternative medium of communication. Crucial to this project is the concurrent development of a critical perspective on mainstream media culture. Video art screenings and readings in media theory will critically address the relations between viewers, producers, and the media. Students must expect to acquire materials and texts costing approx. $50.00 to be used in exercises in classroom presentations. Access to equipment and editing facilities will be available. Lab fee: $125. Class size is strictly limited. Fulfills Basic Production Requirement.

DMS 103A Basic Video
staff :: MW 9:00 – 10:50AM :: CFA 286
REG# 16778

This course is a basic introduction to the tools and techniques of video production. Students will become familiar with using video and develop strategies for its application as an alternative medium of communication. Crucial to this project is the concurrent development of a critical perspective on mainstream media culture. Video art screenings and readings in media theory will critically address the relations between viewers, producers, and the media. Students must expect to acquire materials and texts costing approx. $50.00 to be used in exercises in classroom presentations. Access to equipment and editing facilities will be available. Lab fee: $125. Class size is strictly limited. Fulfills Basic Production Requirement.

DMS 103B Basic Video
staff :: T/R 9:00am-10:50pm :: CFA 286
REG#16691

This course is a basic introduction to the tools and techniques of video production. Students will become familiar with using video and develop strategies for its application as an alternative medium of communication. Crucial to this project is the concurrent development of a critical perspective on mainstream media culture. Video art screenings and readings in media theory will critically address the relations between viewers, producers, and the media. Students must expect to acquire materials and texts costing approx. $50.00 to be used in exercises in classroom presentations. Access to equipment and editing facilities will be available. Lab fee: $125. Class size is strictly limited.

Fulfills Basic Production Requirement.

DMS 105 Basic Documentary
Staff :: MW 1-2:50PM :: CFA 286
REG#16852

This course will present students with the fundamental, theoretical, creative, and technical concerns of documentary and video production. Students will be introduced to methods of research, production design, approach to subject, interviewing and the structuring of information, as well as the technical video skills of camera work, sound recording, and lighting and editing, as they apply specifically to the documentary process. The demands of documentary expression require preparation with a different emphasis from that which applies to the personal and experimental approaches to film making and video making. Materials and texts will cost approx. $50. Lab fee: $125. Class size is strictly limited.

Fulfills Basic Production Requirement.

DMS 105B Basic Documentary
Staff :: TR 11:00AM – 12:50PM :: CFA 286
REG#16721

This course will present students with the fundamental, theoretical, creative, and technical concerns of documentary and video production. Students will be introduced to methods of research, production design, approach to subject, interviewing and the structuring of information, as well as the technical video skills of camera work, sound recording, and lighting and editing, as they apply specifically to the documentary process. The demands of documentary expression require preparation with a different emphasis from that which applies to the personal and experimental approaches to film making and video making. Materials and texts will cost approx. $50. Lab fee: $125. Class size is strictly limited.

Fulfills Basic Production Requirement.

DMS 107 Film & Media History I
Roussel, Roy :: ONLINE Course
REG#22490

This course understands media history to include the immediate past/present as well as the distant past. The initial classes are concerned with giving students a definition of ‘medium’ comprehensive enough to include oral and manuscript cultures. The majority of the course focuses on the development of mass media from the advent of print through networked computing. I am particularly concerned with the way various mediums both have enabled environmental media and also provided the means of reflecting on this condition. This course is concerned with giving students key basic concepts to deal with life in what Marshall McLuhan called ‘the electronic village.’ Many short reading assignments along with films, documentaries and on-line material. Many, many short written and media responses.

Fulfills Introduction Interpretation Requirement.

DMS 110 Programming For Digital Art
staff :: T/TH 11:00AM – 12:50PM :: CFA 244
REG#15015

Beginner programming course geared towards Media Study majors with little to no experience who want to pursue Programming Graphics, Game Design and Virtual Reality. This course introduces basic concepts of Computer Science with the javascript programming language, while incorporating a Media Study perspective. Non Majors welcome if space available. Lab fee: $125.

Fulfills Basic Production Requirement.

DMS 110 Programming For Digital Art
staff :: M/W 9-10:50AM :: CFA 244
REG#22445

Beginner programming course geared towards Media Study majors with little to no experience who want to pursue Programming Graphics, Game Design and Virtual Reality. This course introduces basic concepts of Computer Science with the javascript programming language, while incorporating a Media Study perspective. Non Majors welcome if space available. Lab fee: $125.

Fulfills Basic Production Requirement.

DMS 121 Basic Digital Arts
staff :: T/TH 9:00am – 10:50am :: CFA 244
REG#16754

This course is an introduction to computer-based media production in the context of contemporary internet tools and techniques. The course covers image and sound editing & manipulation, web development, and interactive design. Crucial to this project is the concurrent development of a critical perspective on mainstream media culture. Viewing/Interacting with contemporary web-based art projects, interventionist art & Hacktivism, and readings in media theory will critically address the relations between viewers, producers, and media. Lab fee: $125.

Fulfills Basic Production Requirement.

DMS 121 Basic Digital Arts
staff :: MW 11:00AM – 12:50PM :: CFA 244
REG#16928

This course is an introduction to computer-based media production in the context of contemporary internet tools and techniques. The course covers image and sound editing & manipulation, web development, and interactive design. Crucial to this project is the concurrent development of a critical perspective on mainstream media culture. Viewing/Interacting with contemporary web-based art projects, interventionist art & Hacktivism, and readings in media theory will critically address the relations between viewers, producers, and media. Lab fee: $125.

Fulfills Basic Production Requirement

DMS 211 PLASMA
Sarlin, Paige :: M 6:00 – 8:40PM :: CFA 112
REG#22430

Performances, Lectures, and Screenings in Media Art (PLASMA) is a course in which students are exposed to contemporary practices and discourses in media art and culture. Beyond the model of a lecture series course, PLASMA engages students in performative, field-based and workshop encounters with professional practitioners operating at national and international levels of visibility. Roughly every other week brings a guest to the course, with alternating weeks providing an opportunity for screenings, critical reflection and discussion. Readings are assigned to complement topics addressed in the work of guest practitioners, including publications of their own, where relevant. The course is part of the undergraduate foundations sequence in Media Study, but is also open to graduate students who meet in a graduate only section to discuss graduate implications of the course content and to explore further concepts and practices.

Fulfills Basic Theory and Intro to Interpretation or Media and Culture.

DMS 212 Green Media
Anstey,Josephine R :: T/TH 11am – 12:50pm :: CFA 112
REG# 24236

Polar bears pacing frantically on melting ice; SUVs gloriously conquering mountain terrain; post-civilization humans struggling for survival on a devastated earth: contemporary media reflects our fears and fantasies about our rapidly changing environment. This course analyzes fictional and documentary media that investigate our relationship to nature: climate change, pollution, environmental justice, wildlife extinction. The course interprets the word media broadly to include film, games, social media, media-art, big data visualization, simulation and sensing. It examines the consciousness-raising power of film, media and journalism; traces the ecological impact of our obsession with the latest media device; and ponders the relationship between our feelings about our changing planet (denial, engagement, optimism, hopelessness) and our actions.

Fulfills Basic Theory and Intro to Interpretation.

DMS 212 Indian Image On Film
Demchak,Stephen John :: T 4:10 – 6:50pm :: Clemen 102
Reg#14004

Explore Hollywood “Indians” through major motion pictures, B Westerns, documentaries, “indies,” and TV episodes (all viewed in class). See how Indigenous filmmakers use stereotypical representations mixed with humor to counter Hollywood’s legacy. Inves-tigate ways the camera tells a different story than the dialog. Examine the visual impact films have on our perceptions of “Indian” history and cultures. Consider how Hollywood’s reel reality stacks up against the Indigenous real reality.

Fulfills Basic Theory and Intro to Interpretation or Media and Culture .

DMS 213 Immigration and Film
staff :: M/W 9:00am – 10:50am :: CFA 232
REG#22486
By looking at representative examples of American and foreign films, this course will critically examine the role of cinema in the construction and exploration of the figure of the racial, ethnic, cultural and social theory. Our topics will include (1) racial, ethnic and cultural identity and its reciprocal relationship with cinema, (2) the notion of realism in relation to the representation of race and ethnicity in film, (3) the cinematic representation of inter-ethnic and intra-ethnic conflict, (4) the position of cinema in the debate between assimilation and multiculturalism. Films will be screened in class and discussed against the background of focused critical readings. The aim of the course is to provide you with an opportunity to develop your critical thinking and writing abilities through class discussions, close readings of films and critical literature, and writing assignments.

Fulfills Basic Theory and Intro to Interpretation or Media and Culture.

DMS 216 Intermediate Digital workshop: wearable computing
staff :: T/TH 1:00PM – 2:50PM :: CFA 246
REG#24241

This course introduces basic concepts and techniques for creating objects, spaces and media that sense and respond to their physical surroundings and the actions and events that transpire there. Moving beyond the interface paradigm of screen, keyboard and mouse, physical computing enables alternate models for interaction with (and through) computers that afford more subtle and complex relations between a range of human and non-human actors.

Fulfills Intermediate Production.

DMS 259 Introduction to Media Analysis
Sarlin, Paige :: MW 3-4pm :: CFA 112
REG#24240

Intro to Media Analysis is an introductory course to Media Analysis examines the rise of especially visual mass media in the 20 th century, from photography, television, and film, to new media. It pays close attention to media historical moments, such as fascism and film in post world war II Italy, or the postmodern turn with the event of digitality. Due to the urgency of political events, we will closely analyze the current media-war-coverage considering mainstream as well as independent media discourses. The respective media are analyzed in light of their materiality. Methodologies vary between Ideology-critique, Cultural Studies, Political Theory, Postmodern Theory, and Semiotics. Students will write essay exams based on course lectures and essays from the course reader.

Fulfills Basic Theory and Intro to Interpretation.

DMS 315 Intermediate Documentary
Lee, Carl :: Th 1:00PM – 4:40PM :: CFA 286
REG#24242

Intermediate Documentary Production is an undergraduate course that will further develop students’ video and audio production and post-production skills through hands-on exploration of non-fiction filmmaking. Students will work on a series of short exercise assignments with a focus on observational shooting, a collaborative in-class project, and a final project. Topics to be covered include: modes of documentary; non-fiction story-telling; observational/verité shooting and audio recording techniques; the interview (approaches, set-up, lighting); lighting for documentary; video technology; image and sound editing; preparing video for online distribution, and additional topics to be decided. Regular screenings of non-fiction work will take place. Students must have taken and passed Basic Video (DMS103) or Basic Documentary (DMS105) or equivalent, or have permission of the instructor to take this class. A lab fee of $125 is assessed for this course.

Fulfills Intermediate Production.

DMS 331 Social and Mobile Media
staff :: T/TH 1 – 2:50pm :: CFA 244
REG# 24243

Fulfills Intermediate Production.

DMS 341 Intermediate Video Wkshp
staff :: T 1:00 – 4:40PM :: CFA286
REG#14873

Prereqs: DMS 103 or 105 or 199s

This hybrid production/theory course will explore concepts taken from various sources, from ‘traditional film’ to sub-genres of ‘experimental film’, media and video art, among others. In class we will screen and discuss works, styles, and techniques that will enable students to analyze how technique has been applied with proficiency. Through a series of different short exercises, students will develop and improve technical knowledge, as their creativity will be challenged to connect ideas with skills. By exploring diverse usages of cameras, microphones, lights, grips and supports, new shooting techniques will be applied in particular production circumstances. The goal is to heighten the students’ aesthetic criteria in the application of technique for environments of media production. Accordingly the students will create a short final project as a conclusion of the semester. This is an intermediate level production course – students should have a basic understanding of camera, sound, and editing tools and be prepared to work both independently and in groups. Lab fee: $125

Fulfills * Intermediate Production requirement.

DMS 343 Digital Post Production
Waham, Sama :: MW 3-4:50 :: CFA 244
REG# 22488

Post-production processes go beyond the great celebration of effects. Generally is thought to give sense to visual and sound signs that allows audiences to go beyond perception, making media more powerful and meeting high standards for cinema, television and new media. When discussing the development of a time based digital piece, it must be clear that there is a schematic and organized process that let experts shape media according to predetermined ideas and concepts.
This class will allow the students to use a variety of tools that shape digital media in a boarder sense, with the goal to potentiate a concept and with the perspective of experimenting with workflows, processes, standards and techniques in digital media post production.Lab fee is $125.

Fulfills Intermediate Production.

DMS 410 Nonfiction Film
Elder, Sarah :: T 11am – 2:40pm :: CFA 235
REG# 24245

This course looks at extraordinary works of Documentary Film from its early raw explorations to its current resurgence in the popular imagination. (No boring documentaries will be seen in this class.) The course explores documentary styles including experimental docs, cinema verite, ‘fake docs’ and cutting edge contemporary work such as interactive docs, networked docs and hybrid genres. Particular focus is on the curious relationship between images of reality and reality itself, and on America’s fascination with reality media. Emphasis is placed on the shifting line between fiction and non-fiction, and misguided notions of documentary “truth”. We also address the ethical and artistic considerations of filming real people and real communities.

Students learn nonfiction critical theory and analyze filmic elements including visual narrativity, storytelling, camera work and editing strategies. Shot by shot, students learn how to identify the construction of each film – form, content, image, audio, and location methods. The course explores award-winning contemporary films with representations of gender issues, ethnicity, popular music, sexual orientation, murder, history, racism, climate change, landscape and love – in works of Wiseman, Maysles, Varda, Friedrich, Riggs, Morris, Oppenheimer, Jerecki, Herzog and others. Spanning more than a century, documentary film has had a far greater influence on narrative cinema than most people realize. Students develop analytical and interpretive media skills applicable to all visual media. Weekly film screenings, class discussion and reading assignments. Attendance is required as well as two papers and a take-home exam. Be prepared to see some exceptional films

Fulfills Global and Thematic Pathways, Advanced Analysis, Advanced Theory, and Media and Culture requirements

DMS 413 Filmic text: Color and Moving Image
staff :: T 5 – 8:40pm :: CFA 112
REG# 22526

How are texts shaped to makes sense of experience? More specifically, how are cinematic stories built to make sense of the world? How does film help us understand our experiences? These are a few of the questions we will consider in this class, which explores how film narratives are developed through a myriad of cinematic languages, from mise en scène to sound to editing. Exploring these detailed structures of the filmic text will encourage us to think about how film uniquely captures the experience of time, one of the fundamental elements of narrative. These inquiries will take us through a range of works from Wong Kar-wai’s disjointed meditations on modernity and alienation to the more conventional narrative structures of Hollywood.

Fulfills Advanced Analysis, Advanced Theory.

Private: DMS 415 Cinema Poetics Survey
Glazier :: T 1 – 4:40pm :: CFA 232
REG# 24246

The question to be undertaken in this course is: what are the poetics of cinema? “Poetics” here means, how art is made — conceived, imagined, realized, and appreciated. In this course we will screen some of the great films in mid-century to late-century film with cultural emphasis (with considerable Latin American cinema) by directors like Federico Fellini, Pedro Almodovar, Eliseo Subiela, Alejandro Amenábar, Akira Kurosawa, Bigas Luna, Julio Medem, Krzysztof Kieslowski, Luis Buñuel, Bernardo Bertolucci, Alejandro González Iñárritu (and possibly Passolini, Di Sica, and Antonioni) with an eye to those devastating moments in these works that give them lasting impact. We will read a few key essays about film and poetics, along with specific filmic poetic works to gain insight into what makes film expressive, how language and film are interwoven, and what it means “to make” in knotty new contemporary milieu. Like, what films are you NOT seeing and why? These are the works that do not seem to show up in class or on the screen, not independent and not mainstream but FILMS that draw from OTHER CULTURAL currencies — like these are the films that you should not leave UB without having seen. Film will continue to endure, regardless of format. The worldwide conversation. These are films, points of view to must form part of your palette, creative, critical, keen — viewed with your inner poet’s eyes. Readings are short, spontaneous explorations of voice, image, color, tone, mood, one page or a few words – poetic – (O’Hara, Duncan, Blaser, Creeley, Paz, Neruda, García Lorca, Borges, Ginsberg) that you can return to again and again. This is a course about experience the magico-realism of the screen, the vibrancy of the imagination, the rich cultural veins that drawn humans together in the image.

Fulfills Advanced Analysis, Advanced Theory.

DMS 416 Experimental Art Workshop (6 Weeks) 1/30/16 – 3/17/16
Yavuz, Ridvan :: T/Th 5-8pm :: CFA 244
REG# 24247

It is an Advanced Production Workshop which pushes the students’ visual storytelling capacities. There is going to be 3 part for teaching in this course: pre-production, production and post production. It is a compressed hands-on workshop which includes all the advanced cinematographic knowledge given in two main parts: The technology part as camera and lighting, and the art of cinematography. Students are going to gain how to use advance camera systems, setups, compositions, manipulations… And especially how to light for creating certain mood with different advanced lighting technics. This course also gives enough sources to understand the art of filmmaking creating by yourself and also creating as a team by considering Hollywood system and beyond studio system. Each student is going to create a short project in advanced level. Lab fee is $125.

Ridvanyavuz.com

Fulfills Advanced Production.

DMS 422 Contemporary Cinema: The Problem of the Other
Roussel, Royal :: W 9 – 11:40am :: CFA 112
REG# 24239

The Other appears to us in many forms – parent, sibling, teacher, lover, enemy, friend. One thing is constant, however, no matter what form it takes the Other seems to hold the key to our identity. We live in the paradox that what we are in ourselves is determined by someone who is, well, Other.

This course examines a number of films and written texts that address this paradox. The films include works by Joseph Lousy, Eric Rohmer, Luis Bunuel and William Wyler among others. The texts include several frown-inducing essays but nothing really overwhelming. Many short written assignments plus a longer essay is required at the end of the semester.

Fulfills Advanced Analysis, Advanced Theory.

Private: DMS 422 Sound and Site
staff :: T/TH 7:00pm- 9:30 pm :: CFA ART
Reg# 24314

This course will introduce projects, concepts and methods for developing site-specific artworks incorporating sound as it may apply to varied interdisciplinary fields that consider ecological aspects of the sonic environment. Orienting our critical inquiry and active investigation in acoustic ecology research we will engage uses of sound as an artistic medium. Students will record, construct and engage with sound environments beginning with sound walks and field recordings, towards developing projects for transmission and installation. This course will include readings, discussion, listening sessions and independent projects. There will be an emphasis on site-specific projects. Historic and contemporary sound artworks will be presented and discussed, and we will work both in the studio and in the field to consider the soundscapes and aural architectures of our surrounding environments. Students will be introduced to recording and audio editing as entry points to working with found and formed sounds.

DMS 423 Programming Graphics 1
Pape, Dave :: MW 1-2:50pm :: CFA 242
REG# 24244

This production course will introduce students to the concepts and practice of programming 3D computer graphics and audio using OpenGL and other libraries. The major focus will be on creating interactive art or games experiences by programming both graphics and sound. The course has three goals: to demystify computer code – we get behind the Graphic User Interface to the machine below; to explore the potential of programming – writing our own code means we can create customized computer tools as well as customized visuals; and to teach the fundamentals of graphics programming. Prerequisites are experience in a programming language such as Python, C, C++, or Java (DMS 121, CSE 113/4/5 or equivalent). Lab fee $100. Contact: dave.pape@acm.org

Fulfills Advanced Production.

DMS 441 Advanced Video
staff :: T/Th 1-2:50pm :: CFA232
Reg#24238

This course addresses the hands-on practice of video production while closely observing the aesthetics of the various stages of video and audio workflow, with a critical examination of form and content.

The learning objective of this course is for the students to develop the ability to capture video images in various locations under controlled and uncontrolled lighting conditions, record audio, and edit those elements together to tell a compelling story.

Through intensive practical projects and exercises, the course offers insight into the essential requirements of film and video storytelling and provides hands-on instruction on the technical processes required to successfully produce short films and videos. Filmmaking is a collaborative process and students are encouraged to explore different crew roles (directing, cinematography, sound recording, editing and post sound) over the projects and exercises that will be assigned in the course, in addition to in-class workshops, discussions and screenings. Lab fee is $125.

Fulfills Advanced Production.

DMS 448 Games, Gender and Society
staff :: T/Th 9 – 10:50am :: CFA 235
REG# 22444

Video games are an increasingly dominant cultural form, industry, and technology driver. The emerging field of Game Studies recognizes that questions of gender are crucial to understanding the role of videos games in society. The goal of this advanced theory course is to provide students with analytical tools to address the history, design, cultures, and theory of games and gaming, with specific focus on gender representation and gender performance. Although gender is fore-fronted as a frame for games analysis and research, the course also considers how race, class, and ethnic differences are represented in games. Fulfills Advanced Analysis.

Fulfills Advanced Analysis or Advanced Theory.

DMS 457 Locative Media and the City
Rueb, Teri :: M 1-4:40 :: CFA 235
REG# 24255

“The recent convergence of film, video, and sound as delivered via mobile media is explored in this field-based production course that literally takes place on the road. Students and faculty travel together and work in small teams to create mobile media works that engage the interrelationship of media, movement, and geography.”

DMS 462 Game Design
Pape,David E :: M/W 9:00AM – 10:50AM :: CFA 242
Reg#22495

Pre Req’s – junior or senior status

Production course on the design of games, both computer-based and analog. We will examine both practical and theoretical aspects of designing a game. Important aspects are how to create something that will be both meaningful and fun to play, and how the rules and other elements of the game affect that. Two things are central to this class: understanding the fundamental formal structures of games, and learning the overall process of designing and developing new games. The course encourages experimental thinking about the boundaries and possibilities of games. Students work in teams to produce a complete game. Thorough, hands-on grounding in the process of game design, including brainstorming, paper prototyping, play-testing, and iterative design. Fosters the skills required to produce, examine, and critique games. Lab fee is $125.

Fulfills Advanced Production.

DMS 484 Language Media Social Vision
Flatt, Michael :: M 3-6:40 :: CFA 232
REG# 22492

When the ground shifts, the next chapter begins. Making things can expand one’s understanding of what it means to be human. […] Finding the vehicles for exploring the edges of your experiences can be a way of transforming thinking into practice. Change is inevitable, adaptation is optional.

—Jessie Shefrin, “Making Is a Kind of Thinking and Thinking Is a Kind of Making”

As Shefrin implies, adaptation to change is necessary for survival. Nothing has brought more profound change in contemporary culture than the digital. In this course, students will develop an understanding of these changes. As viewers, users, and readers of contemporary poetic texts in a variety of media, we will attempt to understand how the digital is shaping us—in our use of language and our media habits—and how we can in turn shape the digital. A combination of theory and praxis will help us discover new perspectives and methods for our critical and artistic practices. We will read well known media critics such as Lev Manovich, Katherine Hayles, and Craig Dworkin alongside poets and artists working in the media discussed by these theorists, including HTML, Flash (R.I.P.), PDFs, GIFs, emojis, and musty, dusty old print. We will use the strategies of these artists to bolster our own creative practices, and to explore critical concepts. For Media Study majors, this course fulfills advanced analysis or Media Study elective. Course Prerequisites: None.

Fulfills Advanced Theory/Advanced Analysis.

DMS 496 (1- 4 CR VARIABLE) MEDIA ARTS INTERNSHIP
Staff
REG# Permission of Instructor

Media Study majors have the opportunity to gain variable academic credit for internships in local and national media production companies, television stations, cable companies, and media access centers. This is an unpaid internship available to majors. Guidelines are set by an internship supervisor in collaboration with a faculty sponsor to provide hands-on practical experience in an on-the-job training program. For registration information, see Elaine Schwartz in 231 CFA.

Media Study Elective.

DMS 499 (1-4 CR VARIABLE) INDEPENDENT STUDY
Staff
REG# Permission of Instructor
Students may arrange for special courses of study with faculty through “Independent Study.” The instructor will set the guidelines for the course on an individual basis. It permits the student to study, independently, in an area where no course is given. Syllabus for Independent Study should be prepared prior to semester, signed by the instructor, with one copy on file with the department. For registration information, see Ann Mangan in 231 CFA. Lab fee for production work: $125

Media Study Elective.