Spring 2016

DMS 103A Basic Video
staff :: MW 9:00 – 10:50AM :: CFA 286
REG# 16380
This course is a basic introduction to the tools and techniques of video production. Students will become familiar with using video and develop strategies for its application as an alternative medium of communication. Crucial to this project is the concurrent development of a critical perspective on mainstream media culture. Video art screenings and readings in media theory will critically address the relations between viewers, producers, and the media. Students must expect to acquire materials and texts costing approx. $50.00 to be used in exercises in classroom presentations. Access to equipment and editing facilities will be available. Lab fee: $125. Class size is strictly limited. Fulfills Basic Production Requirement.

DMS 103B Basic Video
staff :: T/R 9:00am-10:50pm :: CFA 286
REG#17085
This course is a basic introduction to the tools and techniques of video production. Students will become familiar with using video and develop strategies for its application as an alternative medium of communication. Crucial to this project is the concurrent development of a critical perspective on mainstream media culture. Video art screenings and readings in media theory will critically address the relations between viewers, producers, and the media. Students must expect to acquire materials and texts costing approx. $50.00 to be used in exercises in classroom presentations. Access to equipment and editing facilities will be available. Lab fee: $125. Class size is strictly limited. Fulfills Basic Production Requirement.

DMS 103C Basic Video
staff :: MW 3:00 – 4:50PM :: CFA 286
REG# 23999
This course is a basic introduction to the tools and techniques of video production. Students will become familiar with using video and develop strategies for its application as an alternative medium of communication. Crucial to this project is the concurrent development of a critical perspective on mainstream media culture. Video art screenings and readings in media theory will critically address the relations between viewers, producers, and the media. Students must expect to acquire materials and texts costing approx. $50.00 to be used in exercises in classroom presentations. Access to equipment and editing facilities will be available. Lab fee: $125. Class size is strictly limited. Fulfills Basic Production Requirement.

DMS 105A Basic Documentary
staff :: M/W 11:00am-12:50pm :: CFA 286
REG#17263
This course will present students with the fundamental, theoretical, creative, and technical concerns of documentary and video production. Students will be introduced to methods of research, production design, approach to subject, interviewing and the structuring of information, as well as the technical video skills of camera work, sound recording, and lighting and editing, as they apply specifically to the documentary process. The demands of documentary expression require preparation with a different emphasis from that which applies to the personal and experimental approaches to film making and video making. Materials and texts will cost approx. $50. Lab fee: $125. Class size is strictly limited. Fulfills Basic Production Requirement.

DMS 105B Basic Documentary
Staff :: TR 11:00AM – 12:50PM :: CFA 286
REG#17119
This course will present students with the fundamental, theoretical, creative, and technical concerns of documentary and video production. Students will be introduced to methods of research, production design, approach to subject, interviewing and the structuring of information, as well as the technical video skills of camera work, sound recording, and lighting and editing, as they apply specifically to the documentary process. The demands of documentary expression require preparation with a different emphasis from that which applies to the personal and experimental approaches to film making and video making. Materials and texts will cost approx. $50. Lab fee: $125. Class size is strictly limited. Fulfills Basic Production Requirement.

DMS 107 Film & Media History I
Roussel, Roy :: M 9am-12:40am :: CFA 112
REG#24054
This course understands media history to include the immediate past/present as well as the distant past. The initial classes are concerned with giving students a definition of ‘medium’ comprehensive enough to include oral and manuscript cultures. The majority of the course focuses on the development of mass media from the advent of print through networked computing. I am particularly concerned with the way various mediums both have enabled environmental media and also provided the means of reflecting on this condition. This course is concerned with giving students key basic concepts to deal with life in what Marshall McLuhan called ‘the electronic village.’ Many short reading assignments along with films, documentaries and on-line material. Many, many short written and media responses. Fulfills introduction interpretation Requirement.

DMS 110 Programming For Digital Art
staff :: T/TH 11am-12:50pm :: CFA 244
REG#24000
Beginner programming course geared towards Media Study majors with little to no experience who want to pursue Programming Graphics, Game Design and Virtual Reality. This course introduces basic concepts of Computer Science with the javascript programming language, while incorporating a Media Study perspective. Non Majors welcome if space available. Lab fee: $125. Fulfills Basic Production Requirement.

DMS 110 Programming For Digital Art
staff :: M/W 11am-12:50pm :: CFA 244
REG#15259
Beginner programming course geared towards Media Study majors with little to no experience who want to pursue Programming Graphics, Game Design and Virtual Reality. This course introduces basic concepts of Computer Science with the Python programming language, while incorporating a Media Study perspective. Non Majors welcome if space available. Lab fee: $125. Fulfills Basic Production Requirement.

DMS 121 Basic Digital Arts
staff :: T/TH 1:00pm – 2:50pm :: CFA 244
REG#24001
This course is an introduction to computer-based media production in the context of contemporary internet tools and techniques. The course covers image and sound editing & manipulation, web development, and interactive design. Crucial to this project is the concurrent development of a critical perspective on mainstream media culture. Viewing/Interacting with contemporary web-based art projects, interventionist art & Hacktivism, and readings in media theory will critically address the relations between viewers, producers, and media. Lab fee: $125.Fulfills Basic Production Requirement.

DMS 121 Basic Digital Arts
staff :: T/TH 11:00am – 12:50pm :: CFA 244
REG#17344
This course is an introduction to computer-based media production in the context of contemporary internet tools and techniques. The course covers image and sound editing & manipulation, web development, and interactive design. Crucial to this project is the concurrent development of a critical perspective on mainstream media culture. Viewing/Interacting with contemporary web-based art projects, interventionist art & Hacktivism, and readings in media theory will critically address the relations between viewers, producers, and media. Lab fee: $125. Fulfills Basic Production Requirement.

DMS 121 Basic Digital Arts
staff :: T/TH 9:00am – 10:50am :: CFA 244
REG#17159
This course is an introduction to computer-based media production in the context of contemporary internet tools and techniques. The course covers image and sound editing & manipulation, web development, and interactive design. Crucial to this project is the concurrent development of a critical perspective on mainstream media culture. Viewing/Interacting with contemporary web-based art projects, interventionist art & Hacktivism, and readings in media theory will critically address the relations between viewers, producers, and media. Lab fee: $125.Fulfills Basic Production Requirement.

DMS 211 PLASMA
Glazier, Loss :: M 6:30 – 9:00PM :: CFA 112
REG#22430
Performances, Lectures, and Screenings in Media Art (PLASMA) is a course in which students are exposed to contemporary practices and discourses in media art and culture. Beyond the model of a lecture series course, PLASMA engages students in performative, field-based and workshop encounters with professional practitioners operating at national and international levels of visibility. Roughly every other week brings a guest to the course, with alternating weeks providing an opportunity for screenings, critical reflection and discussion. Readings are assigned to complement topics addressed in the work of guest practitioners, including publications of their own, where relevant. The course is part of the undergraduate foundations sequence in Media Study, but is also open to graduate students who meet in a graduate only section to discuss graduate implications of the course content and to explore further concepts and practices. Fulfills Intro to Interpretation or Media and Culture .

DMS 212 Indian Image On Film
McCarthy :: T 4:10 – 6:50pm :: Norton 209
Reg#14190
Explore Hollywood “Indians” through major motion pictures, B Westerns, documentaries, “indies,” and TV episodes (all viewed in class). See how Indigenous filmmakers use stereotypical representations mixed with humor to counter Hollywood’s legacy. Inves-tigate ways the camera tells a different story than the dialog. Examine the visual impact films have on our perceptions of “Indian” history and cultures. Consider how Hollywood’s reel reality stacks up against the Indigenous real reality. Fulfills Intro to Interpretation or Media and Culture .

DMS 213 IMMIGRATION & FILM
staff :: M/W 9:00am – 10:50am :: CFA 232
REG#24049
By looking at representative examples of American and foreign films, this course will critically examine the role of cinema in the construction and exploration of the figure of the racial, ethnic, cultural and social theory. Our topics will include (1) racial, ethnic and cultural identity and its reciprocal relationship with cinema, (2) the notion of realism in relation to the representation of race and ethnicity in film, (3) the cinematic representation of inter-ethnic and intra-ethnic conflict, (4) the position of cinema in the debate between assimilation and multiculturalism. Films will be screened in class and discussed against the background of focused critical readings. The aim of the course is to provide you with an opportunity to develop your critical thinking and writing abilities through class discussions, close readings of films and critical literature, and writing assignments. The course fulfills the American Pluralism requirement. Fulfills the American Pluralism requirement or Media and Culture or Media Study Elective.

DMS 213 Immigration and Film
staff :: T/TH 9:00am – 10:50am :: CFA 232
REG#15200
By looking at representative examples of American and foreign films, this course will critically examine the role of cinema in the construction and exploration of the figure of the racial, ethnic, cultural and social theory. Our topics will include (1) racial, ethnic and cultural identity and its reciprocal relationship with cinema, (2) the notion of realism in relation to the representation of race and ethnicity in film, (3) the cinematic representation of inter-ethnic and intra-ethnic conflict, (4) the position of cinema in the debate between assimilation and multiculturalism. Films will be screened in class and discussed against the background of focused critical readings. The aim of the course is to provide you with an opportunity to develop your critical thinking and writing abilities through class discussions, close readings of films and critical literature, and writing assignments. The course fulfills the American Pluralism requirement. Fulfills the American Pluralism requirement or Media and Culture or Media Study Elective.

DMS 221 Web Development
Pape :: MW, 1:00pm – 2:50pm :: CFA244
REG#22042
Web Development focuses on the design and production of web-based media. Topics will include: web development (HTML5, CSS3, JavaScript, JQuery) as well as the use of content management systems (WordPress, PHP). For students with basic, intermediate, or no coding experience. Lab Fee $125 Fulfills Intermediate Production Requirement.

DMS 231 Game and Animation Workshop
staff :: MW 3-4:50pm :: CFA 242
REG# 24134
Lab fee is $125
Fulfills Intermediate Production Requirement.

DMS 341 Intermediate Video Wkshp
staff :: T/Th – 1:00PM – 2:50PM :: CFA286
REG#15110 Prereqs: DMS 103 or 105
This hybrid production/theory course will explore concepts taken from various sources, from ‘traditional film’ to sub-genres of ‘experimental film’, media and video art, among others. In class we will screen and discuss works, styles, and techniques that will enable students to analyze how technique has been applied with proficiency. Through a series of different short exercises, students will develop and improve technical knowledge, as their creativity will be challenged to connect ideas with skills. By exploring diverse usages of cameras, microphones, lights, grips and supports, new shooting techniques will be applied in particular production circumstances. The goal is to heighten the students’ aesthetic criteria in the application of technique for environments of media production. Accordingly the students will create a short final project as a conclusion of the semester. This is an intermediate level production course – students should have a basic understanding of camera, sound, and editing tools and be prepared to work both independently and in groups. Lab fee: $125 Fulfills * Intermediate Production requirement.

DMS 343 Digital Post Production
staff :: T/TH 3:00pm – 4:50pm :: CFA 244
REG#24051
Post-production processes go beyond the great celebration of effects. Generally is thought to give sense to visual and sound signs that allows audiences to go beyond perception, making media more powerful and meeting high standards for cinema, television and new media. When discussing the development of a time based digital piece, it must be clear that there is a schematic and organized process that let experts shape media according to predetermined ideas and concepts.
This class will allow the students to use a variety of tools that shape digital media in a boarder sense, with the goal to potentiate a concept and with the perspective of experimenting with workflows, processes, standards and techniques in digital media post production.Lab fee is $125. Fulfills Intermediate Production Requirement.

DMS 404 Advanced Documentary Production
Elder :: T/TH 11am-12:50pm :: CFA 235
REG#22047
This course is an advanced workshop in which students create an original documentary project in video (or film, still photography, audio or web-based formats with the permission of instructor). Creativity and originality will be stressed with exercises to encourage “seeing”, “listening” and artistic risk taking. Individual projects may go in many creative directions including the political, personal, humorous, experimental, conventional, transgressive, ethnographic, client-based or activist. Students will gain a solid understanding of contemporary non-fiction forms and the particular problems which non-fiction makers face. Films by contemporary artists will be shown on a regular basis with special attention to experimental documentary work. We will look at dramatic structure, story telling, and narrative/non-narrative forms of editing. Emphasis will be given to production techniques which bring access and intimacy to the video subject and integrity to the documentary. The course will explore ethical issues and problems of privacy and intrusion. Students will develop production skills in research, fieldwork, collaboration, interviewing, location sound recording, camera skills, and production management. Each student will produce one short documentary piece, with supporting assignments in shooting, sound, and digital editing on the Media 100. A written production book will be required. A class film festival ends the semester. Prerequisite: DMS Basic Documentary, or DMS Basic Video and DMS Intermediate Video. Attendance is mandatory. Lab fee $125
Fulfills Advanced Production

DMS 413 Filmic Text: Color & Moving Image
Shilina-Conte,Tatiana :: Th 4-740pm :: CFA112
REG#24091
A feast for the eyes, this class will take you on an “over the rainbow tour” of color history and effects in cinema. “There never was a silent film,” Irving Thalberg famously declared, and just as with sound, color has accompanied cinema since its inception. Early filmmakers employed applied processes such as hand-painting, stenciling, tinting and toning, long before the advent of such photographic systems as Technicolor and Eastmancolor. After a brief overview of the history of cinematic color, we will concentrate on its expressive and affective use as a means of evoking atmosphere, establishing mood and conveying implicit messages. We will examine color palettes of various directors, comparing Tom Tykwer’s saturated and succulent reds and yellows with Andrey Tarkovsky’s subdued and subtle greens and browns. We will also discuss the concept of synesthesia and color’s ability to create cross-communication among the senses through visual outbursts of emotion. The discourse of color has become a widely addressed topic in the post-cinematic age, as it raises questions of the preservation and restoration of moving images, changing notions of archiving, and the introduction of new digital effects. Films and excerpts will include a number of early shorts, The Adventures of Prince Achmed, Flowers and Trees, Becky Sharp, Ivan the Terrible, The Red Balloon, Kwaidan, Shadows of Forgotten Ancestors, Trois Couleurs, Cyclo, 20 Fingers, and The Fall, among others. This course will fulfill advanced analysis.

DMS 414 Film Narrative: Cinema in the Post-Media Age
Shilina-Conte,Tatiana :: T 5 – 8:40pm :: CFA112
REG#24053
“Cinema Is Dead, Long Live Cinema,” Peter Greenaway recently declared. This class will examine a “moving” target, focusing on the current ontology of cinema as it attempts to redefine its status in a “multi-sensory milieu” (Rancière) of digital technologies and emerging media.
As cinema has been uprooted from its former habitat and is being transplanted into the new media ecosystem, will it wither away as an alien species or become acclimatized and blossom in an unprecedented way? The post-cinematic phenomenon already resembles the explosion of a supernova, ranging from definitions of cinema as an “incredibly shrinking medium” (Rodowick) to a “chameleon-like inter-medium” (Petho) and embracing such distribution platforms as the mini-displays of personal mobile devices and gigantic public IMAX screens.
In this class we will become witnesses to cinema’s death(s) and reincarnation(s), as we watch its shape-shifting process from the analog to the digital body. We will probe a host of symptoms, including decomposition, fading, flammability of the film stock, and CGI, digital remastering, and 3-D modeling that affect the digital cinematic tissue. We will touch upon such topics as database cinema, soft cinema, multiplex cinema, cinema of attractions and cinema of effects (spectacular cinema), cinema and surveillance, post-media aesthetics, new film history and media archaeology and preservation of moving images. We will consider the aesthetic, cultural, and social repercussions promoted by the global media convergence, which entails cardinal shifts in the patterns of production, reception and distribution of cinematic images.
As is the case with all transitional periods, a set of questions arises: Does cinema equal technology and should be understood in the strict sense of medium specificity, or should we adopt a broader approach to cinema as a form of “world viewing” (Cavell)? Has film in fact been purely organic and asymptomatic in its indexical status as many theoreticians seem to claim? Is the cinematic metamorphosis voluntary or forced? Is this transplantation merely an occurrence of cultural nostalgia? Will it diminish or increase the media biodiversity? What kind of new cinematic genres will evolve as the result of this transplantation? Does cinema live in a “digital dark age” (Usai) or will the digital divide signal the arrival of a “brave new world” for cinema?
These questions lead to the pressing demand for a new film history and theory (Elsaesser) that will substantially modify, if not supplant the methodological apparatus of classical film theory. This class will explore the foundations of this new film theory, scrutinizing writings by Manovich, Elsaesser, Shaviro, Sobchack, Jenkins, Krauss, Siegert, Rancière, Rodovick, Naficy, etc. Works by Michael Haneke, Chris Marker, Jean-Luc Godard, Elia Suleiman, Esteban Sapir, Ettore Scola, Mike Figgis, Ari Folman, Chan-wook Park, Guy Maddin, Peter Greenaway, Alexander Sokurov, Apichatpong Weerasethakul and others will be considered as media examples.
To sum up, the major agenda of this class will be to arrive at a dynamic definition of cinema in the thriving environment of digital diversity by analyzing the glo(c)al energy flows and processes that govern today’s media ecosystem. Perhaps, together with Niels Niessen, we will come to the realization that “the declaration of cinema’s death arrives prematurely.” This course will fulfill advanced analysis.

DMS 416 Sound and Sense
Rueb, Teri :: M 1 – 4:40pm :: CFA235
REG#24055
This seminar will be organized around a close reading of philosophers writing on sound and sense. We will also read and audition the work of sound artists and practitioners who have inquired into the nature of sound and sense through a variety of enactments. Students will keep media journals–including short listening exercises, writings and sound productions–through which they can explore and reflect upon their everyday sound experiences throughout the semester. Part seminar, part experimental practice-based research, the course encourages a self-reflexive and performative inquiry into questions regarding the relationship of sound and sense. Some questions to be considered include: How has sound been historically understood as one of the (five) senses, how does the naming and categorizing of the senses structure knowledge and ways of knowing, how are hearing and listening related, how do sonic and acoustic metaphors structure consciousness, how do new forms of secondary orality mutually inform ways of knowing and ways of doing, what political implications can we read into an acoustically articulated epistemology? Lab fee: $125 Fulfills Advanced Production Requirement.

DMS 417 Contemporary Cinema
Roussel :: W 9am – 12:40pm :: TBA
REG#22045
The Other appears to us in many forms – parent, sibling, teacher, lover, enemy, friend. One thing is constant, however. No matter what form it takes the Other seems to hold the key to our identity. We live in the paradox that what we are in ourselves is determined by someone who is, well, Other.
This course examines a number of films and written texts that address this paradox. The films include works by Joseph Lousy, Eric Rohmer, Luis Bunuel and William Wyler among others. The texts include several frown-inducing essays but nothing really overwhelming. Many short written assignments plus a longer essay is required at the end of the semester.This course will fulfill advanced analysis.

DMS 435 Scriptwriting: All Media
Anstey,Josephine R :: MW 11am – 12:50pm :: CFA235
Reg#24058
In this production workshop students will concentrate on writing and editing text/script elements for their media projects. The course will explore both traditional and experimental methods for generating and structuring text for fictional and documentary work. Texts may include original writing, interview material, collaged or found fragments, that will be performed, heard or displayed in the final piece. The texts may be linear, non-linear, interactive, poetic…
http://josephineanstey.com/Teaching/ScriptWritingAllMedia
Lab fee: $125. This course will fulfill advanced production.

DMS 442 Advanced Video Production
Braemer:: T 1 – 4:40pm :: CFA 235
REG#24060
“My personal work feels like an oil slick on this flowing current, spreading in two or three directions at once”- Tony Conrad.
This is an advanced production course with Professor Tony Conrad. Tony has been doing research tracing the “science and technology” history of music all the way back into the 17th century, while also working with Tony Oursler on his Influence Machine project, which addresses the twinning of communications and spiritualism in the nineteenth century. He has been a constant and dedicated contributor to the media community here in Western NY—whether through our regional media centers, or public access cable TV, or the galleries and museum here. Much of his artistic production (and visibility) in recent years has been in audio performance or installation, often with a strong visual complement. Lab fee of $125 This course will fulfill advanced production.

DMS 447 Sound Design
Bouquard :: F 11am – 2:40pm :: CFA232
REG#24050
The object of sound design is to explore issues and techniques in the area of sound design and digital audio production. The “visual” media –film and video- are powerfully inflected by their accompanying audio tracks, which frequently convey the work’s preponderant sensibility, or even its core meaning. This course will prepare students technically, conceptually and musically to work with audio. Lab fee is $125 Fulfills Advanced Production Requirement.

DMS 448 Games, Gender and Society
Curry :: T/TH 1pm – 2:50pm :: CFA232
REG#24057
Video games are an increasingly dominant cultural form, industry, and technology driver. The emerging field of Game Studies recognizes that questions of gender are crucial to understanding the role of videos games in society. The goal of this advanced theory course is to provide students with analytical tools to address the history, design, cultures, and theory of games and gaming, with specific focus on gender representation and gender performance. Although gender is fore-fronted as a frame for games analysis and research, the course also considers how race, class, and ethnic differences are represented in games. Fulfills Advanced Analysis.

DMS 462 Game Design
Pape,David E :: M/W 12 – 1:50pm :: CFA 242
Reg#24059
Production course on the design of games, both computer-based and analog. We will examine both practical and theoretical aspects of designing a game. Important aspects are how to create something that will be both meaningful and fun to play, and how the rules and other elements of the game affect that. Two things are central to this class: understanding the fundamental formal structures of games, and learning the overall process of designing and developing new games. The course encourages experimental thinking about the boundaries and possibilities of games. Students work in teams to produce a complete game. Thorough, hands-on grounding in the process of game design, including brainstorming, paper prototyping, play-testing, and iterative design. Fosters the skills required to produce, examine, and critique games. Lab fee is $125. Fulfills Advanced Production.

DMS 484 Language Media Social Vision
Glazier :: Tuesday, 3 – 6:40pm :: CFA112
REG#24056
This course examines language, media, and social imagination through great minds of the BEAT GENERATION & AFTER including Allen Ginsberg, Jack Kerouac, William Burroughs, and Charles Bukowski. We will read essential works (e.g., Howl, On the Road, Naked Lunch, and Factotum) and screen films related to this culture-warping generation of outrageous American rebels with special attention to comparing their writings with VARIOUS FILM VERSIONS of their works, from quasi-commercial productions such as On the Road and Barfly to dark ruminations like Cronenberg’s Naked Lunch and the ultra-existential Saharan Sheltering Sky. We will hear the rhythm in the writing, read the word, demystify the play of image on the screen. We will consider how a literary generation can, through media, voice, written word, and image, open new doors to imagination and innovation, and allow us to approach the digital. Attendance and screenings are essential. Required: Class participation, readings, oral presentation, film journal. This course will fulfill advanced analysis.

DMS 486 Media Robotics 2: The Well Behaved Robot
Bohlen :: T/Th 3 – 4:40pm :: CFA246
REG#24061
This undergraduate seminar offers an introduction to robot ethics. We will consider the recent history of robotics and the long history of ethics to ask the how synthetic intelligent systems living amongst us should behave in everyday life. Our goal will be to understand what is required and what is at stake when one intends to make robots not just behave, but behave well. Students will be asked to investigate a robotic system of their choice and to participate in a group design challenge to create a well-behaved robot based on the insights gained in class. Lab fee: $125 This course will fulfill advanced production.

DMS 496 (1- 4 CR VARIABLE) MEDIA ARTS INTERNSHIP
Staff
REG# Permission of Instructor
Media Study majors have the opportunity to gain variable academic credit for internships in local and national media production companies, television stations, cable companies, and media access centers. This is an unpaid internship available to majors. Guidelines are set by an internship supervisor in collaboration with a faculty sponsor to provide hands-on practical experience in an on-the-job training program. For registration information, see Elaine Schwartz in 231 CFA. Media Study Elective.

DMS 499 (1-4 CR VARIABLE) INDEPENDENT STUDY
Staff
REG# Permission of Instructor
Students may arrange for special courses of study with faculty through “Independent Study.” The instructor will set the guidelines for the course on an individual basis. It permits the student to study, independently, in an area where no course is given. Syllabus for Independent Study should be prepared prior to semester, signed by the instructor, with one copy on file with the department. For registration information, see Ann Mangan in 231 CFA. Lab fee for production work: $100 Media Study Elective.