Spring 2015
  • DMS 103A Basic Video

    Vaubel:: MW 9:00 – 10:50AM :: CFA 286
    REG# 17686

    This course is a basic introduction to the tools and techniques of video production. Students will become familiar with using video and develop strategies for its application as an alternative medium of communication. Crucial to this project is the concurrent development of a critical perspective on mainstream media culture. Video art screenings and readings in media theory will critically address the relations between viewers, producers, and the media. Students must expect to acquire materials and texts costing approx. $50.00 to be used in exercises in classroom presentations. Access to equipment and editing facilities will be available. Lab fee: $100. Class size is strictly limited.

    Fulfills Basic Production Requirement.

  • DMS 103B Basic Video

    Coombs :: T/R 9:00am-10:50pm :: CFA 286
    REG#17578

    This course is a basic introduction to the tools and techniques of video production. Students will become familiar with using video and develop strategies for its application as an alternative medium of communication. Crucial to this project is the concurrent development of a critical perspective on mainstream media culture. Video art screenings and readings in media theory will critically address the relations between viewers, producers, and the media. Students must expect to acquire materials and texts costing approx. $50.00 to be used in exercises in classroom presentations. Access to equipment and editing facilities will be available. Lab fee: $100. Class size is strictly limited.

    Fulfills Basic Production Requirement.

  • DMS 105A Basic Documentary

    Gilichinskaya,Yulia :: M/W 1:00-2:50pm :: CFA 286
    REG#17771

    This course will present students with the fundamental, theoretical, creative, and technical concerns of documentary and video production. Students will be introduced to methods of research, production design, approach to subject, interviewing and the structuring of information, as well as the technical video skills of camera work, sound recording, and lighting and editing, as they apply specifically to the documentary process. The demands of documentary expression require preparation with a different emphasis from that which applies to the personal and experimental approaches to filmmaking and video making. Materials and texts will cost approx. $50. Lab fee: $100. Class size is strictly limited.

    Fulfills Basic Production Requirement.

  • DMS 105B Basic Documentary

    Staff :: TR 11:00AM – 12:50PM :: CFA 286
    REG#17613

    This course will present students with the fundamental, theoretical, creative, and technical concerns of documentary and video production. Students will be introduced to methods of research, production design, approach to subject, interviewing and the structuring of information, as well as the technical video skills of camera work, sound recording, and lighting and editing, as they apply specifically to the documentary process. The demands of documentary expression require preparation with a different emphasis from that which applies to the personal and experimental approaches to filmmaking and video making. Materials and texts will cost approx. $50. Lab fee: $100. Class size is strictly limited.

    Fulfills Basic Production Requirement.

  • DMS 108 Film & Media History II

    McGough,Laura :: T 11am-2:40pm :: CFA 112
    REG#15026

    Film History will expose students to screenings and scholarship chronicling the political and technological conditions of film production from the 1890’s to the present. We will broadly examine early motion pictures, pre-code Hollywood, German Expressionism, French Impressionism and Surrealism, Soviet Montage, Neorealist, the French New Wave, Post-Colonial African filmmaking, 1970’s Hollywood, digital filmmaking, and large format documentary. Attendance, readings, weekly response journal, and research paper are required.

  • DMS 110 Programming For Digital Art

    Nam,Su Hyun :: T/TH 11am-12:50pm :: CFA 244
    REG#15582

    Beginner programming course geared towards Media Study majors with little to no experience who want to pursue Programming Graphics, Game Design and Virtual Reality. This course introduces basic concepts of Computer Science with the Python programming language, while incorporating a Media Study perspective. Non Majors welcome if space available. Lab fee: $100.

    Fulfills Basic Production Requirement.

  • DMS 121 Basic Digital Arts

    Feiner,Sean M :: MW 9:00AM – 10:50AM :: CFA 244
    REG#17868

    This course is an introduction to computer-based media production in the context of contemporary internet tools and techniques. The course covers image and sound editing & manipulation, web development, and interactive design. Crucial to this project is the concurrent development of a critical perspective on mainstream media culture. Viewing/Interacting with contemporary web-based art projects, interventionist art & Hacktivism, and readings in media theory will critically address the relations between viewers, producers, and media. Lab fee: $100.

    Fulfills Basic Production Requirement.

  • DMS 121 Basic Digital Arts

    Dhillon, Nitasha :: T/TH 9:00AM – 10:50AM :: CFA 244
    REG#17657

    This course is an introduction to computer-based media production in the context of contemporary internet tools and techniques. The course covers image and sound editing & manipulation, web development, and interactive design. Crucial to this project is the concurrent development of a critical perspective on mainstream media culture. Viewing/Interacting with contemporary web-based art projects, interventionist art & Hacktivism, and readings in media theory will critically address the relations between viewers, producers, and media. Lab fee: $100.

    Fulfills Basic Production Requirement.

  • DMS 211 PLASMA

    Glazier, Loss + Sarlin, Paige + Conrad, Tony :: M, 6:30-9PM :: CFA112
    REG# 24069

    PLASMA — Performances, Lectures, and Screenings in Media Art (PLASMA) is a speaker, film, and media arts series presented by the Department of Media Study and co-sponsored by numerous related SUNY Buffalo departments, programs, institutes, and centers, presenting acclaimed, innovative, and adventurous forays across shifting media-arts boundaries. PLASMA speakers present outstanding currents of thought in the field, including media theory, New Media work, artistic practice, game studies, gender and technology, robotics, locative media, performance, media poetics, and a multiple of related interdisciplinary approaches.

    Enrolling in PLASMA offers the additional opportunities to explore further in depth the issues and ideas at hand. In addition to guest speakers, the 2015 course, will include a screening film series on art and art culture. Course sessions will be led principally by me, with guest speakers being introduced by faculty host presenters. Undergrad students will read a short essay each week, share their work, keep a course journal, and remain impeccable about attendance.

     

    Fulfills Intro to Interpretation or Media and Culture Requirements

  • DMS 212 Indian Image On Film

    McCarthy :: T 4:10 – 6:50pm :: NSC215
    Reg#14424

    Explore Hollywood “Indians” through major motion pictures, B Westerns, documentaries, “indies,” and TV episodes (all viewed in class). See how Indigenous filmmakers use stereotypical representations mixed with humor to counter Hollywood’s legacy. Inves-tigate ways the camera tells a different story than the dialog. Examine the visual impact films have on our perceptions of “Indian” history and cultures. Consider how Hollywood’s reel reality stacks up against the Indigenous real reality.

  • DMS 213 IMMIGRATION & FILM

    Stadelmann,Tanya Andrea:: MW 1:00PM – 2:50PM :: CFA 112
    REG#15512

    By looking at representative examples of American and foreign films, this course will critically examine the role of cinema in the construction and exploration of the figure of the racial, ethnic, cultural and social theory. Our topics will include (1) racial, ethnic and cultural identity and its reciprocal relationship with cinema, (2) the notion of realism in relation to the representation of race and ethnicity in film, (3) the cinematic representation of inter-ethnic and intra-ethnic conflict, (4) the position of cinema in the debate between assimilation and multiculturalism. Films will be screened in class and discussed against the background of focused critical readings. The aim of the course is to provide you with an opportunity to develop your critical thinking and writing abilities through class discussions, close readings of films and critical literature, and writing assignments. The course fulfills the American Pluralism requirement.

    Fulfills the American Pluralism requirement or Media and Culture or Media Study Elective.

  • DMS 213 IMMIGRATION & FILM

    Granata,Yvette Marie :: TR 9:00AM – 10:50PM :: CFA 232
    reg#17525

    By looking at representative examples of American and foreign films, this course will critically examine the role of cinema in the construction and exploration of the figure of the racial, ethnic, cultural and social theory. Our topics will include (1) racial, ethnic and cultural identity and its reciprocal relationship with cinema, (2) the notion of realism in relation to the representation of race and ethnicity in film, (3) the cinematic representation of inter-ethnic and intra-ethnic conflict, (4) the position of cinema in the debate between assimilation and multiculturalism. Films will be screened in class and discussed against the background of focused critical readings. The aim of the course is to provide you with an opportunity to develop your critical thinking and writing abilities through class discussions, close readings of films and critical literature, and writing assignments.

    Fulfills the American Pluralism requirement or Media and Culture or Media Study Elective.

  • DMS 216 Wearable Computing

    Lessner,Elizabeth :: T/TH, 11:00AM – 12:50pM :: CFA246
    REG#15002

    This course focuses on wearable and ‘soft’ computing as a vehicle for artistic engagement with the fields of design, technology, and time-based media. We will explore topics of privacy, surveillance, mediated reality, augmented reality, and medical aid. Soft circuitry techniques (Lilypad Arduino, conductive paint, fabric, etc.) will be demoed in class and explored in the development of expressive and wearable projects. Readings and lectures will be interdisciplinary and focus on relationships between the body, technology, fashion, social interactions, and the environment. The class culminates in the design, development, and prototyping of working pieces by participants. Lab fee: $100

    Fulfills Intermediate Production Requirement.

  • DMS 221 Web Development

    Clark :: M/W 11- 12:50PM :: CFA 244
    REG#23607

    Web Development focuses on the design and production of web-based media. Topics will include: web development (HTML5, CSS3, JavaScript, JQuery) as well as the use of content management systems (WordPress, PHP). For students with basic, intermediate, or no coding experience. Lab fee: $100

    Fulfills Intermediate Production Requirement.

  • DMS 315 Hacking Social Media

    Curry, Derek Charles :: T/TH , 1pm – 2:50pm :: CFA244
    REG#23615 

    Recent developments in social media provide a wealth of data and opportunities for new ways of interacting that had previously not existed.  Social media shapes the way people interact with each other and is a fertile, but under-explored space for artists to experiment.  In this production class, we examine the various uses of, and ways of interacting with, social media.  Student projects will interface with social media using the APIs provided by sites such as Facebook and Twitter, and experiment with alternative modes of interacting and data mining.  The first project of the course will be a Twitter bot that will make automatic queries and posts to Twitter when prompted by either an automated search or another user’s post.  Subsequent projects will explore the use of web-crawlers, the use of data from Facebook, the DIY programming of Facebook apps, creative data visualization, and the use of sensors or QR codes to add physical interaction. Familiarity with social media interfaces is not necessary, but students should have some prior experience with programming. Lab fee is $100.

    Fulfills Intermediate Production Requirement.

  • DMS 316 Community Based Art

    Curry,Laura E :: Online
    REG#23606 

    This is an intermediate production class for those who would like to use video, audio, performance, object, direct engagement, etc. for projects grounded and framed in community collaborations.

    Students will produce a series of approximately 4 small projects paying attention to the social, political, and cultural contexts that frame their everyday life, and which will act as the groundwork for their final project, and project proposal.

    The first few projects will focus on site research as the student develops relationships and/or ideas with community groups, specific sites, or other community entities.

    The students are required to work in teams and are encouraged to remain open to unexpected tools and mediums of expression that best frame their community based art project.

    The expectation is that the students will have knowledge of any technology they wish to use. The instructor encourages an open class dialogue via the class website where ideas, knowledge, project documentation, and technology tips are freely shared as part of the class process.

    Because this is an on-line class, the instructor will use the Internet to bring the students “with” her during a month long residency in Mexico to begin the semester in January. The instructor will meet with students, in person at their project site(s) in Buffalo NY beginning in March, at mutually agreeable times arranged by the students and the instructor.

    “Education for Socially Engaged Art: A Materials and Techniques Handbook” by Pablo Helguera is the required text. Other reading material will be provided in pdf via the course website.

    The class will meet twice weekly online: Tuesday and Thursday from 1:00pm to 2:00pm EST as video chat or text chat sessions.

  • DMS 316 Earth Wind Fire Water & Other Media

    Sargent,Paul Lloyd :: T R , 3:00 – 4:50 PM :: CFA232
    REG# 24070

    Western New York’s built environment is constructed atop a complex ecosystem of “first nature” topography and hydrology comprised of lakes, rivers, marshes, forests, fields, and other features. While environmental conditions of the landscape inform the development of cultures, economies, and societies within the region, in this age that many in the sciences and humanities are calling the Anthropocene, so, too, have socio-cultural and economic factors shaped this now-mediated ecology: channelized rivers converge within polluted bays and harbors to outflow into the Great Lakes, whose shorelines are crisscrossed by train tracks, highways, power lines, fiber optic cables, wastewater systems, smokestacks, runways, canals, and more, forming layer upon layer of interwoven media networks.

    This intermediate-level, research-led production class in media ecology will focus on theories, experiments, and projects emerging from an array of disciplines, philosophies, and practices to critically investigate and respond to such media ecologies as resource extraction, production, and consumption networks, waste systems, communications technology infrastructures, “black box” social and infrastructural engineering systems, waterway management, etc, through the production of site- and/or place-specific media experimentation. Buttressing our selection of readings from media theory, media archeology, [urban] political ecology, and cultural geography, students will investigate new and emerging art, engineering, and design practices by utilizing a selection of devices and technologies, from digital imaging machines, cell phone-based GPS applications, data visualization software, and more through the production of short projects and assignments, as well as a formal, semester-long final project in the medium of their choosing.

    This course will fulfill Media and Culture requirement.

  • DMS 341 Intermediate Video Wkshp

    Nieto Uribe,Sergio Andres :: T – 1:00PM – 4:40PM :: CFA286
    REG#15412

    Prereqs: DMS 103 or 105

    This hybrid production/theory course will explore concepts taken from various sources, from ‘traditional film’ to sub-genres of ‘experimental film’, media and video art, among others. In class we will screen and discuss works, styles, and techniques that will enable students to analyze how technique has been applied with proficiency. Through a series of different short exercises, students will develop and improve technical knowledge, as their creativity will be challenged to connect ideas with skills. By exploring diverse usages of cameras, microphones, lights, grips and supports, new shooting techniques will be applied in particular production circumstances. The goal is to heighten the students’ aesthetic criteria in the application of technique for environments of media production. Accordingly the students will create a short final project as a conclusion of the semester. This is an intermediate level production course – students should have a basic understanding of camera, sound, and editing tools and be prepared to work both independently and in groups. Lab fee: $100

    Fulfills * Intermediate Production requirement.

  • DMS 375 Science, Culture & Media

    Nickard,Gary L. :: M/W 3:15- 4:35pm :: Clemen 107
    REG#15982

    Science Culture and Media: Introduces critical issues in science, culture, and emerging media-especially as they pertain to contemporary artistic practice. Topics are addressed through artists’ works; selected readings include historical trends, biotechnology, virtuality, net theory, and cultural resistance.

    This course will fulfill Media and Culture requirement.

  • DMS 404 Advanced Documentary Prod

    Elder,Sarah M :: T/TH 3-4:50pm :: CFA 235
    REG#23613

    This course is an advanced workshop in which students create an original documentary project in video (or film, still photography, audio or web-based formats with the permission of instructor). Creativity and originality will be stressed with exercises to encourage “seeing”, “listening” and artistic risk taking. Individual projects may go in many creative directions including the political, personal, humorous, experimental, conventional, transgressive, ethnographic, client-based or activist. Students will gain a solid understanding of contemporary non-fiction forms and the particular problems which non-fiction makers face. Films by contemporary artists will be shown on a regular basis with special attention to experimental documentary work. We will look at dramatic structure, story telling, and narrative/non-narrative forms of editing. Emphasis will be given to production techniques which bring access and intimacy to the video subject and integrity to the documentary. The course will explore ethical issues and problems of privacy and intrusion. Students will develop production skills in research, fieldwork, collaboration, interviewing, location sound recording, camera skills, and production management. Each student will produce one short documentary piece, with supporting assignments in shooting, sound, and digital editing on the Media 100. A written production book will be required. A class film festival ends the semester. Prerequisite: DMS Basic Documentary, or DMS Basic Video and DMS Intermediate Video. Lab fee: $100. Attendance is mandatory.

    Lab fee: $100

    Fulfills Advanced Production.

  • DMS 410 Non Fiction Film

    Elder :: T/TH 11am-12:50pm :: CFA 235
    REG#23614

    This course is an exploration of the principal theories of film through a critical reading of texts and a close examination of films. The texts to be perused comprise several groups. Classical film theory includes Munsterburg, Kuleshov, Pudovkin, Eisenstein, Balasz, Arnheim, Bazin, and Godard. The critique of classical film theory includes Burch, Perkins, and Henderson. The course will also explore semiotics, psychoanalysis, and poststructuralism, in Barthes, Eco, Metz , Pasolini, Baudry, Heath, and in feminist film theory, including Gledhill, Mulvey, Silverman, Modleski, Doane, and Studlar. A section on avant-garde theory will include Vertov, Epstein, Deren, Brakhage, Sitney, and Michelson. These topic areas will be set in interaction throughout: e.g., Soviet editing and antirealism are continued in the avant-garde; rhetorical figures such as metaphor, metonymy, ellipsis, condensation, and displacement, can be traced in very different theoretical contexts and in close readings of individual films.

    This course will fulfill advanced analysis.

  • DMS 411 Film and Media Theory

    Staff :: T 5 – 8:40pm :: CFA112
    REG#24142

    This course will guide you through the maze of “pre-” and “post-,” “-isms” and “-ships” in film studies.  We’ll examine theories of realism, formalism, semiotics, psychoanalysis, feminism, structuralism, post-structuralism and cognitive criticism with a particular emphasis on the sensory dimension of the moving image.  Assigned readings for the course will include selections from the writings of Bazin, Eisenstein, Baudry, Metz, Balasz, Gunning, Arnheim, Mulvey, Bordwell, Deleuze, Marks, Sobchack and Shaviro, among others. Following Thomas Elsaesser’s approach to film theory through the senses, and focusing on the role of the spectator in cinema, we will study classical and contemporary film paradigms through the interaction between Moving Image and Senses, Body and Mind, emphasizing such metaphors of filmic experience as Window and Frame, Door and Screen, Mirror and Face. Watching such films as Peeping Tom by Powell, Repulsion by Polanski, Persona by Bergman, Stalker by Tarkovsky, The Hand by Wong Kar Wai, we will not only interpret the way we “see” and “hear” films but also explore them through our senses of touch, smell and even taste. As Elsaesser points out, “film and spectator are like parasite and host, each occupying the other and being in turn occupied.” This unique approach to the confrontation and conflation of mind and body with the screen will open for us new models for knowing and representing the world through film and media.

    This course will fulfill advanced analysis.

  • DMS 416 Experimental Film

    Ortiz, Eliseo :: M/W 3-4:50pm :: CFA 286
    REG#23612

    This is an intermediate level course to experimental 16mm and super8 film production. Class will expand the knowledge gained in previous film courses and explore new alternatives of experimentation; sessions will include screenings, lectures, demonstrations and exercises. Students will learn how to use optics, projectors and camera devises in unconventional ways. The course will explore the critical relationship between theory and practice in the context of contemporary experimental cinema. By the end of the semester students will be able to create experimental animation/stop motion work on 16mm film, create titles for film, create multichannel installation work, use loopers for film, and film stereoscopic images. Students will be required to complete collaborative class projects and individual assignments. Each student will also be required to complete a final project. Lab fee $100. Possible additional cost for supplies.

    Fulfills Intermediate or Advanced Production Requirement.

  • DMS 417 The Well Behaved Robot

    Bohlen,Marc :: M/W 10-11:50AM :: CFA 246
    reg#23611

    Who is at fault if a robot car creates a traffic accident?

    This undergraduate seminar will offer an introduction to robot ethics, the question of how synthetic intelligent systems living amongst us should behave and how they might it into everyday life. We will discuss state of the art robotic systems (robot automobiles, pets, servants and military robots) and consider the role of ethics from the perspective of the autonomous machine, the system designers and the general public. Students will be asked to investigate a robotic system of choice and to participate in a group design challenge  to create a well-behaved robot based on the insights gained in class. Lab fee is $100.

    Fulfills Advanced Production or Advanced Analysis Requirement.

  • DMS 422 Film Directors

    Jackson, T , 7:00 PM – 9:40 PM
    reg # 24438

    HELD AT THE AMHERST THEATRE, MAIN STREET ACROSS FROM THE SOUTH CAMPUS

    Analysis of aspects of feature filmmaking based on study and discussion of classic films by great directors. For example: Prof. Bruce Jackson, The Buffalo Film Seminars This class is an experiment in looking at and talking about films. It?s a regular UB class, but the general public is welcome to attend. The two of us introduce each film, we screen it, we take a short break, and then we talk about the film with the students and anyone in the audience who wants to join us. The non-student part of the audience has been running over 200 people for each screening, about half of whom stay for the discussions. The Buffalo Film Seminars are grounded in two underlying assumptions. The first is that watching a good film on a television set is like reading a good novel in Cliff?s Notes or Classic Comics: you may get the contour of the story but not the experience of the work. Movies were meant to be seen big, in the company of other people. The second is that a conversation among people of various ages and experiences about a good movie they?ve all just seen can be interesting and useful. We try to pick films that will let us think and talk about genre, writing, narrative, editing, directing, acting, context, camera work, relation to sources. The only fixed requirement is that they have to be great films–no films of “academic” interest only. For example: Prof. D. Schmid, Hitchcock The aim of this class is to watch and discuss a representative sample of films from the long and distinguished career of the great director Alfred Hitchcock (1899-1980). You will learn why Hitchcock is considered to be one of the supreme masters of the film genre, what the major themes and concerns of his work are, and how to approach and analyze a Hitchcock film. Along the way, we will discuss such subjects as auteur theory, film history, and cinematic technique. Throughout the class, we will emphasize how Hitchcock himself and his films have come to embody the possibilities of cinema.

  • DMS 425 Visual Media Poetics

    Glazier,Loss:: W 3 – 6:40pm :: CFA 232
    REG#24103

    Visual Media Poetics investigates the visual aspects of the work of media art, looking at various genres of art-making across media, with attention to visual aspects. On what levels do the visual aspects of a work contribute to the overall fabric of the work of art? What “poetics” means in this context is involves thinking about how visuality is expressed, how it is made, what makes it artistically interesting. To answer these questions, works of digital media, film, and text that mark definitive milestones as visually fluent media works will be examined in depth, including a number of films, digital works, and textual works include films directors such as Almodovar, Antonioni, Kubrick, Lisandro Alonso, Julio Medem, Herzog, Kurosawa, Fellini, etc., digital works by Pierre Alfieri, David Jhave Johnston, Roderick Coover, and others, and textual works including poetry, artist’s books, visually-oriented digital poetry language works, and early experimental works in all media. Of interest, also, is the relationship to such films to dream, the subconscious, alternative modes of thinking, philosophical concepts, and contemporary theory. There are many directions we can pursue! We will look at works of Concrete and digital poetry and consider these as models for digital media design. We will look at theoretical essays and manifestos related to visual media practice, investigating modes and means of visual media expression, as seen through a number of documentary and narrative sources. Methods will include close reading of films, digital works, and creative and critical texts. Visual poetics is about watching observantly and reading poetic texts closely. Course meets once a week for 3 hours to allow screening time and discussion of films. Note: A significant number of films may be in Spanish or other languages (with subtitles). Course requirements: Weekly readings, a class journal, an oral presentation, a final project, exams, and quizzes as necessary. Attendance is crucial. Course text: TBA.

    This course will fulfill advanced analysis.

  • DMS 438 Virtual Worlds 1

    Pape :: W 5-8:40pm :: CFA 286
    REG#23621

    Lab fee is $100.

    Fulfills Advanced Production.

  • DMS 442 Advanced Video Production

    Braemer,Dorothea :: Th 11am – 2:40pm :: CFA 232
    REG#21878

    This course is a narrative-based, production-and writing intensive class
    focusing on scriptwriting for short film, scene analysis and directing. In
    the first half of the class we will focus on script writing and scene
    analysis, while in the second part we will collectively produce and direct
    scenes we have written in the first part. The course emphasizes hands-on
    production and directing experience and personal and creative expression
    through short narrative film. Lab fee is $100.

    Fulfills Advanced Production.

  • DMS 447 Sound Design

    Bouquard,Michael John :: MW 1 – 2:50pm :: CFA 232
    REG#18475

    The object of sound design is to explore issues and techniques in the area of sound design and digital audio production. The “visual” media –film and video- are powerfully inflected by their accompanying audio tracks, which frequently convey the work’s preponderant sensibility, or even its core meaning. This course will prepare students technically, conceptually and musically to work with audio. Lab fee $100.

    Fulfills Intermediate or Advanced Production Requirement.

  • DMS 462 Game Design

    Pape,David E :: M/W 9 – 10:50am :: CFA 242
    Reg#21882

    Production course on the design of games, both computer-based and analog. We will examine both practical and theoretical aspects of designing a game. Important aspects are how to create something that will be both meaningful and fun to play, and how the rules and other elements of the game affect that. Two things are central to this class: understanding the fundamental formal structures of games, and learning the overall process of designing and developing new games. The course encourages experimental thinking about the boundaries and possibilities of games. Students work in teams to produce a complete game.  Thorough, hands-on grounding in the process of game design, including brainstorming, paper prototyping, play-testing, and iterative design. Fosters the skills required to produce, examine, and critique games. Lab fee is $100.

    Fulfills Advanced Production.

  • DMS 463 Interactive Fiction

    Anstey, Josephine R :: M/W 1 – 2:50pm :: CFA 242
    REG#23618

    Story has been a driver and colonizer of both literary forms (poetry, drama, the novel) and mass media (print, radio, film, TV, mobile phone, games). This course looks at mainstream and fringe attempts to create fictional and literary experiences in and around computer media. Students will read theoretical texts, analyze work, and experiment with the creation of their own interactive narratives. Lab fee is $100.

    Fulfills Advanced Production or Advanced Analysis Requirement.

  • DMS 474 Media Theories and Approaches

    Karppi, Tero Jukka :: M/W 11am – 12:50pm :: CFA 235
    REG# 24102

    Memes, social networks, movies, soundscapes, smartphone interfaces surround our everyday actions. Media theories and approaches is designed to introduce undergraduate students to theoretical ideas and frameworks that can be used as analytical tools for understanding and explaining what happens in and with media. This course gives tools to analyze media texts and images, but it also maps the different and changing relations we have with media from social networks to movies and virtual environments. Focusing on different media theories the course aims at understanding what is media, what kind of relation we as subjects, perceivers and audiences have with media and what are the new media theory questions especially related to computational culture. This course is composed of lectures, reading assignments and different individual and collaborative explorations to media theories and approaches.

    This course will fulfill advanced analysis.

  • DMS 496 (1- 4 CR VARIABLE) MEDIA ARTS INTERNSHIP

    Staff
    REG# Permission of Instructor

    Media Study majors have the opportunity to gain variable academic credit for internships in local and national media production companies, television stations, cable companies, and media access centers. This is an unpaid internship available to majors. Guidelines are set by an internship supervisor in collaboration with a faculty sponsor to provide hands-on practical experience in an on-the-job training program. For registration information, see Elaine Schwartz in 231 CFA.

    Media Study Elective.

  • DMS 499 (1-4 CR VARIABLE) INDEPENDENT STUDY

    Staff
    REG# Permission of Instructor
    Students may arrange for special courses of study with faculty through “Independent Study.” The instructor will set the guidelines for the course on an individual basis. It permits the student to study, independently, in an area where no course is given. Syllabus for Independent Study should be prepared prior to semester, signed by the instructor, with one copy on file with the department. For registration information, see Ann Mangan in 231 CFA. Lab fee for production work: $100

    Media Study Elective.