Spring 2010

Undergraduate Course Descriptions (Archived)

DMS 101A BASIC FILM MAKING
Chouinard:: MW 9:00-10:50pm :: CFA 278
REG#339315

This course is intended to provide a basic introduction to 16mm film production. Classes will include screenings, lectures, and demonstrations. Students will learn basic camera operation, lighting, editing, and sound acquisition. In addition, the course will explore the critical relationship between theory and practice in the context of film production. Students will be required to complete collaborative class projects, individual assignments, and a critical paper. Each student will also be required to complete a short, non-sync, 16mm film project. Class materials will cost approx. $150. Lab fee: $100. Class size is strictly limited. Fulfills Basic Production Requirement

 

DMS 101B BASIC FILM MAKING
Scime :: TR 11:00am-12:50pm :: CFA 278
REG#246631

This course is intended to provide a basic introduction to 16mm film production. Classes will include screenings, lectures, and demonstrations. Students will learn basic camera operation, lighting, editing, and sound acquisition. In addition, the course will explore the critical relationship between theory and practice in the context of film production. Students will be required to complete collaborative class projects, individual assignments, and a critical paper. Each student will also be required to complete a short, non-sync, 16mm film project. Class materials will cost approx. $150. Lab fee: $100. Class size is strictly limited. Fulfills Basic Production Requirement

 

DMS 103A BASIC VIDEO
Vo :: MW 11-12:50pm :: CFA 278
REG#240395

This course is a basic introduction to the tools and techniques of video production. Students will become familiar with using video and develop strategies for its application as an alternative medium of communication. Crucial to this project is the concurrent development of a critical perspective on mainstream media culture. Video art screenings and readings in media theory will critically address the relations between viewers, producers, and the media. Students must expect to acquire materials and texts costing approx. $50.00 to be used in exercises in classroom presentations. Access to equipment and editing facilities will be available. Lab fee: $100. Class size is strictly limited. Fulfills Basic Production Requirement

 

DMS 103B BASIC VIDEO
Parkins :: TR 9-10:50am :: CFA 278
REG#109044

This course is a basic introduction to the tools and techniques of video production. Students will become familiar with using video and develop strategies for its application as an alternative medium of communication. Crucial to this project is the concurrent development of a critical perspective on mainstream media culture. Video art screenings and readings in media theory will critically address the relations between viewers, producers, and the media. Students must expect to acquire materials and texts costing approx. $50.00 to be used in exercises in classroom presentations. Access to equipment and editing facilities will be available. Lab fee: $100. Class size is strictly limited. Fulfills Basic Production Requirement

 

DMS 105 BASIC DOCUMENTARY
Demchenko :: MW 11:00am-12:50pm :: CFA 235
REG#474784

This course will present students with the fundamental, theoretical, creative, and technical concerns of documentary and video production. Students will be introduced to methods of research, production design, approach to subject, interviewing and the structuring of information, as well as the technical video skills of camera work, sound recording, and lighting and editing, as they apply specifically to the documentary process. The demands of documentary expression require preparation with a different emphasis from that which applies to the personal and experimental approaches to filmmaking and video making. Materials and texts will cost approx. $50. Lab fee: $100. Class size is strictly limited. Fulfills Basic Production Requirement

 

DMS 108 FILM HISTORY 2
Bardin :: TR 3:00pm-4:50pm :: CFA 112
REG#212394

This course will continue with the history of cinema from roughly WWII to the present day. Taking a multi-cultural look at this medium, this course will show a myriad of films from all over the world made by visionary directors who have changed the aesthetic, conceptual and ideological landscape of filmmaking throughout it�s history. We will be examining cinema paradigm shifts inspired by such movements as /Italian Neo-Realisism/, /New German Cinema/ , /The French New Wave/ and /Third World Cinema/ The course will provide students with basic tools and skills to analyze, both technically and conceptually, how filmic images are constructed, how they create meaning, how they influence our lives and how they have become embedded in our historical, ideological and cultural landscape. Fulfills Intro To Interpretation Requirement

DMS 109 FILM INTERPRETATION
Johnson :: TR 9:00am-10:50am :: CFA 235
REG#174974

Film Aesthetics have had an enormous impact on the development of media, from television to the internet to video games, as well as on our personal experiences of our everyday lives: “I feel like I’m in a movie!” This course provides an introduction to the main concepts and themes that constitute the rapidly expanding field of Film Studies.  In this course, we will learn to recognize the techniques and conventions that structure our experience of cinema – narrative, mise-en-scene, cinematography, editing, sound, genre – in order to understand how these various components combine to yield an overall sense of film form. We will survey global film history, critically viewing examples of silent film, classical Hollywood, world cinema, experimental, documentary, and independent narrative film. We will also examine isolated clips from a variety of films as they relate to the weekly discussion topics. Fulfills Intro To Interpretation Requirement

 

DMS 110 PROGRAMMING FOR DIGITAL ART
Moreno :: TR 9:00am-10:50am :: CFA 242
REG#039481

Beginner programming course geared towards Media Study majors with little to no experience who want to pursue Programming Graphics, Game Design and Virtual Reality. This course introduces basic concepts of Computer Science with the Python programming language, while incorporating a Media Study perspective.  Non Majors welcome if space available. Fulfills Basic Production Requirement

 

DMS 121A BASIC DIGITAL ARTS
Noonan :: MW 9-10:50am :: CFA 244
REG#288937

This course will present fundamental concepts and methods that underlie the use of computers in generating and processing digital works and examine them in the context of contemporary artistic practice in painting, photography, film, and video. The impact of computers, both present and potential, on the more traditional arts will be discussed. Through the use of imaging audio and presentation software, students will explore the various ways in which computers deal with images, sound and structures, adapting these methods to produce work of their own. Work by contemporary artists working in the digital medium will be shown and examined on a regular basis. The class size is strictly limited. Lab fee: $100. Fulfills Basic Production Requirement

 

DMS 121B BASIC DIGITAL ARTS
Delrieu Schulze :: MW 11-12:50pm :: CFA 244
REG#396325

This course will present fundamental concepts and methods that underlie the use of computers in generating and processing digital works and examine them in the context of contemporary artistic practice in painting, photography, film, and video. The impact of computers, both present and potential, on the more traditional arts will be discussed. Through the use of imaging audio and presentation software, students will explore the various ways in which computers deal with images, sound and structures, adapting these methods to produce work of their own. Work by contemporary artists working in the digital medium will be shown and examined on a regular basis. The class size is strictly limited. Lab fee: $100. Fulfills Basic Production Requirement

 

DMS 155 (LECTURE) INTRODUCTION TO NEW MEDIA
Caporlingua :: T 9:00am-10:50am :: CFA 112
REG# xxxxxx(Register for a lab, this will enroll you for the lecture as well)

DMS 155 A1 (LAB) INTRODUCTION TO NEW MEDIA
Caporlingua:: R 9:00am-10:50am :: CFA 244
REG#402722

DMS 155 A2 (LAB) INTRODUCTION TO NEW MEDIA
Caporlingua :: R 11:00am-12:50pm :: CFA 244
REG#218922

This course provides an introduction to design and the production of interactive multimedia. The content of the class will focus on the theoretical and practical aspects of creating and integrating digital media with authoring/presentation tools. This class will lay the foundation for creating interactive projects for the web and CD-ROMS, and will integrate art, journalism, and music through hands-on developmental projects in our new state-of-the-art Mac lab. Students will learn the process and skills necessary to create a web site and an interactive CD-ROM which integrates animation, graphic design, sound, and text, working in Adobe Photoshop, Macromedia Dreamweaver, Flash animation, Sound Edit 16, and Illustrator. The course will accommodate 48 students. Enroll now! Get the technological edge! Lab fee $100. Fulfills Basic Production Requirement

 

DMS 213 IMMIGRATION & FILM
Douglas :: MW 1:00pm-2:50pm :: CFA 232
REG#301877

By looking at representative examples of American and foreign films, this course will critically examine the role of cinema in the construction and exploration of the figure of the racial, ethnic, cultural and social theory. Our topics will include (1) racial, ethnic and cultural identity and its reciprocal relationship with cinema, (2) the notion of realism in relation to the representation of race and ethnicity in film, (3) the cinematic representation of inter-ethnic and intra-ethnic conflict, (4) the position of cinema in the debate between assimilation and multiculturalism. Films will be screened in class and discussed against the background of focused critical readings. The aim of the course is to provide you with an opportunity to develop your critical thinking and writing abilities through class discussions, close readings of films and critical literature, and writing assignments. Fulfills the American Pluralism requirement or Media and Culture or Media Study Elective

 

DMS 213 IMMIGRATION & FILM
Kolberg :: MW 9:00am-10:50am :: CFA 232
REG#404019

By looking at representative examples of American and foreign films, this course will critically examine the role of cinema in the construction and exploration of the figure of the racial, ethnic, cultural and social theory. Our topics will include (1) racial, ethnic and cultural identity and its reciprocal relationship with cinema, (2) the notion of realism in relation to the representation of race and ethnicity in film, (3) the cinematic representation of inter-ethnic and intra-ethnic conflict, (4) the position of cinema in the debate between assimilation and multiculturalism. Films will be screened in class and discussed against the background of focused critical readings. The aim of the course is to provide you with an opportunity to develop your critical thinking and writing abilities through class discussions, close readings of films and critical literature, and writing assignments. Fulfills the American Pluralism requirement or Media and Culture or Media Study Elective

 

DMS 213 IMMIGRATION & FILM
Section C :: T R 11:00 AM – 12:50 PM :: CFA 232
REG#219683

By looking at representative examples of American and foreign films, this course will critically examine the role of cinema in the construction and exploration of the figure of the racial, ethnic, cultural and social theory. Our topics will include (1) racial, ethnic and cultural identity and its reciprocal relationship with cinema, (2) the notion of realism in relation to the representation of race and ethnicity in film, (3) the cinematic representation of inter-ethnic and intra-ethnic conflict, (4) the position of cinema in the debate between assimilation and multiculturalism. Films will be screened in class and discussed against the background of focused critical readings. The aim of the course is to provide you with an opportunity to develop your critical thinking and writing abilities through class discussions, close readings of films and critical literature, and writing assignments. Fulfills the American Pluralism requirement or Media and Culture or Media Study Elective

 

DMS 216 INTERMEDIATE SOUND ART
Thompson :: TR 9:00am-10:50am :: CFA 232
REG#424808

This course is designed to give students a theoretical, historical and practical introduction to sound as a creative medium. Sound art is a broad discipline that is inherently interdisciplinary, with strong roots in experimental music, installation and performance art. Through a series of readings, discussions, and collaborations, we will investigate the ways that sound influences our understanding of public space. We will also examine the work of contemporary artists that use sound as a relational, particpatory medium through interactive technologies and participation-based practices.
The course is divided into four sections:
Section 1 Acoustic Ecology, Psychogeography, Listening and Recording
Section 2 Sound Hacking, Circuit Bending and Basic Electronics
Section 3 Noise, Conceptualism, Fluxus and Performance
Section 4: Site-Specific Installation, Relational Practices, Mobile Technologies

 

 

 

Students will have the opportunity to create innovative, experimental installations in public space through self-directed Studio Projects. If you have any questions about this course, please contact Jessica Thompson at jlt36 [AT] buffalo [dot] edu. Non * Intermediate Production

 

 

DMS 217 CREATIVE VIDEO WORKSHOP
Chow :: MW 11:00am-12:50pm :: CFA 232
REG#007085

Prerequisites: DMS 103 or DMS 105 and Passing Portfolio Review This course is a workshop in the tools of video. It offers exercises in video production for students who have had some previous exposure to video as a creative medium. The course will emphasize the development of technical skills and knowledge which are necessary for the effective use of video as an artistic tool and for documentation or personal expression. The student will produce a series of project concerning cameras, lighting, editing, and other aspects of production and post-production. Using cross-culture material to create video work. Each student will need to spend a substantial amount of time working with studio, portable, and editing facilities outside the regular class hours. In addition, some outside videotape viewing, as well as short papers, will be required. Readings will include classroom handouts in addition to the assigned textbook. $100 lab fee. This course can count towards the “*” Intermediate Production course or as an elective.

 

DMS 219 INTERMEDIATE TO ANIMATION
Chouinard :: MW 1:00pm-2:50pm :: CFA 265
REG#023905

Intermediate Animation is an intensive, production based course in which animated motion is studied and applied in a wide variety of non-computer based techniques including: pencil and paper, cut-outs, rotoscoping, stop-motion, pixelation, camera-less, paint on glass, etc. The student will be expected to complete several short animated excercises incorporating the techniques covered in the course. Pre Req Intor to Animation or permission of instructor. Non * Intermediate Production

 

DMS 259 INTRO TO MEDIA ANALYSIS
Roussel :: MW 11:00am – 12:50pm :: CFA 112
Reg #330929

This course is designed to provide students with an historical and theoretical context for current and – hopefully – future developments in media. The course begins with an extended (more than one lecture) discussion of the nature of media focused on the work of Marshall McLuhan. With this as a context, we will read key texts in 20th century media theory including essays by Habermas, Adorno, Debord, Hall, Baudrillard, Barthes, etc. Finally, we’ll read current (21st century!!) work addressing issues in social networking, immersive media and the impact of databases on narrative. Some of this material is – ahh – dense but my approach to it is straightforward: I believe in reading a smaller number of essays carefully as opposed to reading more material quickly. Where I think it is appropriate I provide reading guides but I would be lying if I didn’t say that you will probably spend some time in front of a book with a frown on your face. Many short assignments. The Department of Media Study is based on the idea that making media can be as analytical and critical an act as writing about media so, where appropriate, I’ll entertain either response to the assignment. Fulfills Intro to Interpretation or Media Study Elective

 

DMS 259 INTRO TO MEDIA ANALYSIS
E. Conrad :: TR 11:00am – 12:50pm :: CFA 112
Reg #162107

This course provides an historical and theoretical context for thinking-writing-making media. We will look at media in a broad context, starting with discussions about human perception and representation and ending with contemporary concerns around networks, ownership and surveillance. Along the way, we will read classic texts from 20th century media theory, including essays by McLuhan, Habermas, Adorno, Benjamin, Baudrillard, Debord, etc. This will be complemented with contemporary texts by the likes of Virilio, Hayles, Rheingold and Turkle. This course aims to strengthen the connection between text and experience, and to that end we will also spend a considerable amount of time experiencing media by seeing, hearing and otherwise interacting with works from film, video, sound, music, photography, painting, games, performance, digital art, etc. In the Department of Media Study, we believe that making media can be as analytical and critical as writing about media, and where appropriate, students may respond to assignments in the form of their choice. Fulfills Intro to Interpretation or Media Study Elective

 

DMS 341 INTERMEDIATE VIDEO WORKSHOP
Bouquard, M.J. :: TR 1:00pm-2:50pm :: CFA 278
REG#241330 PR: DMS 103, 104, 105, or 106

In this course, students will explore and experiment with the video medium through a series of short exercises. Improvement of technical knowledge and skills will be emphasized, and creativity encouraged. Topics to be explored will include: video camera, advanced shooting techniques, sound gathering techniques, microphone placement and selection, non-linear sound editing, lighting techniques for studio and location, non-linear editing. Students learn properties of audio, video and still assets, and practice importing, logging, and insert assembly editing. They also develop a sensitivity to the unique aesthetic and usability criteria of digital video in application environments. Fulfills * Intermediate Production

 

DMS 401 ADVANCED FILM
Lee :: F 11am – 2:40pm :: CFA 232
Reg #048664

This is an advanced level film production course open to undergraduate and graduate students who have successfully completed an intermediate-level film production class and have produced at least one short 16mm film. This course will review the key components of filmmaking from pre-production to post-production with an emphasis on further developing individual ideas and visions. While the class is open to all approaches, emphasis will be placed on unconventional means of storytelling. Students should come to class with an initial concept for a substantive project which they will complete to a fine-cut stage. Students will maintain a production book for the final project that includes pre-production materials, budget, and production notes and logs. Exercises in alternative techniques will be assigned and explored. Hands-on production will be supported with readings, practical and theory-based, and screenings of contemporary and historical work. Students can expect to spend $250 to $400 in additional costs for materials and processing for the course. Students will receive some assistance with supplies and film stock. Lab fee: $100. Fulfills * Advanced Production

 

DMS 404 ADVANCED DOCUMENTARY
Caplan :: W 3:00pm-6:40pm :: CFA 278
REG#394312

The documentary form in Media Study here at UB has enjoyed a rich history through Professor Elder. Changes in production and post-production technology have assisted in capturing images and sound, but the core of the documentary format has remained similar since its inception. Why are many documentary films easily recognizable as “documentary”? The form is based on a time structure, which relates to subject matter and content. Advanced Documentary will seek to build on the intro and intermediate level courses with an enhanced uptick in output. DMS students with a concentration in production will be expected to pull their production skills into a 15-week concentration. In this advanced level class, which will have strict pre-requisites, time will be the experimenter, and students will work within this genre in both traditional and non-traditional time constructs. There will be an emphasis on the structure of the frame and cinematographic detail with regard to how images are collected and organized for postproduction. Students will be expected to achieve a high level of output on a weekly basis of both shot and edited material within this production concentration. Story format as it relates to ideas will have to be defended on the basis of visual clarity. There will be an emphasis on “working” and students will be expected to produce more than one project at the same time. Students will also be expected to write about their ideas, defend them in class discussion and make correction/revision within their project timelines for the following week. Students interested in filmmaking, experimentation and results should enroll in this course. Fulfills * Advanced Production

 

DMS 411 FILM THEORY
Henderson:: MW 1:00pm – 2:50pm :: CFA 235
Reg #000942

This course is an exploration of the principal theories of film through a critical reading of texts and a close examination of films. The texts to be perused comprise several groups. Classical film theory includes Munsterburg, Kuleshov, Pudovkin, Eisenstein, Balasz, Arnheim, Bazin, and Godard. The critique of classical film theory includes Burch, Perkins, and Henderson. The course will also explore semiotics, psychoanalysis, and poststructuralism, in Barthes, Eco, Metz , Pasolini, Baudry, Heath, and in feminist film theory, including Gledhill, Mulvey, Silverman, Modleski, Doane, and Studlar. A section on avant-garde theory will include Vertov, Epstein, Deren, Brakhage, Sitney, and Michelson. These topic areas will be set in interaction throughout: e.g., Soviet editing and antirealism are continued in the avant-garde; rhetorical figures such as metaphor, metonymy, ellipsis, condensation, and displacement, can be traced in very different theoretical contexts and in close readings of individual films. This course is an exploration of the principal theories of film through a critical reading of texts and a close examination of films. The texts to be perused comprise several groups. Classical film theory includes Munsterburg, Kuleshov, Pudovkin, Eisenstein, Balasz, Arnheim, Bazin, and Godard. The critique of classical film theory includes Burch, Perkins, and Henderson. The course will also explore semiotics, psychoanalysis, and poststructuralism, in Barthes, Eco, Metz, Pasolini, Baudry, Heath, and in feminist film theory, including Gledhill, Mulvey, Silverman, Modleski, Doane, and Studlar. A section on avant-garde theory will include Vertov, Epstein, Deren, Brakhage, Sitney, and Michelson. These topic areas will be set in interaction throughout: e.g., Soviet editing and antirealism are continued in the avant-garde; rhetorical figures such as metaphor, metonymy, ellipsis, condensation, and displacement, can be traced in very different theoretical contexts and in close readings of individual films. Fulfills Advanced Analysis or Media Study Elective

 

DMS 415 SOCIAL WEB MEDIA
Larsen :: MW 6:00pm – 7:50pm :: CFA 112
Reg #257076

What defines the future of the Internet? The strategic tag cloud of tomorrow includes terms like The Internet of Things, RFID, Web2.0, Grid Computing, LambdaRail, Internet2 and many others. Social Web Media maps online group formation and emerging computing technologies that amplify cooperation and distributed creativity. While most of the theory in this field is dominated by entrepreneurial management rhetoric, we will focus on independent social web media in the cultural sector. What is worth defending about the current end-2-end Internet? The middle-class household Internet of the developed world enables a culture of sharing in the unregulated commons, free culture (i.e. file sharing, open source culture), cultures of participation and generosity (i.e. citizen journalism, open archives, open journals, knowledge repositories), and network culture (i.e. the ability for self-organized social networks to form). Today, more often than not we are users *and* producers online. Fulfills Advanced Analysis or New Media or Media Study Elective

 

DMS 416 FOOD AND EMERGING MEDIA
Bardin :: T R, 11:00 AM – 12:50 PM :: CFA 235
Reg #324396

A course dedicated to exploring the role of emerging media and new technology on the exploration and articulation of topics focussing on the many facets of food. We will be looking at artists who utilize technology to explore and in many cases expose issues within our tightly veiled food production systems. These artists include /The Critical Art Ensemble/ and their “Free Range Grains”/ / project which explores the topic of genetically modified food, /The Yes Men/ and their piece “Re-burger” which addresses issues of starvation in third world countries and the/ //Future Farmers/ who create work that challenge current social, political and economic systems. The course will also focus on issues of /Sustainablity/ and artists who are currently using their practice to explore ways of improving upon food production and distribution models. We will also be looking at the ways chefs, academics and independent acolytes use the Internet to publicize their work, writings and interests and how this medium has influenced the gastronomic landscape. These platforms include the /Association for the Study of Food and Society/ (ASFS) listserv, MIT’s /Counter Intelligence Group/ which focuses on technological approaches to functional, cognitive, and social support in the home and sites like /Ideas in Food/ where Aki Kamozawa and H. Alexander Talbot write in detail on their experiments in flavor and composition. Through a rigorous practice of watching, investigating, talking and writing about artists, chefs, culinary scholars and DIY individuals who utilize media in their discussion, research, profession and practice of food related endeavors, students will gain insight into how these emerging technologies and artistic practices influence the realm of gastronomy as well as the food we eat.Fulfills Advanced Analysis or Media Study Elective

 

DMS 420 ADVANCED DIGITAL ARTS/PROGRAMMING GRAPHIC
Anstey :: MW 1:00pm – 2:50pm :: CFA 244
Reg#477403

This course will focus on thematic, conceptual and creative issues as students produce computer-based works for interactive media. It will be a place for students to initiate and follow through on substantive projects based both in creative concepts and technical research. It will be open to any and all types of computer-based or technology-driven work, projects designed exclusively for viewing with computer and monitor and projects that involve installation or physical computing elements. Students should come with considerable skills in this area, be motivated to try new things, and be prepared for critiques. url:http://josephineanstey.com/Teaching/AdvancedDigital Fulfills * Advanced Production

 

DMS 434 SEWING CIRCUITS AND WEARABLE MEDIA
E. Conrad :: T R, 3:00 PM – 4:50 PM :: CFA 246
Reg#312950

This production course explores the expressive potential of soft circuitry and wearable media. We will explore the materials and construction techniques of �soft computing� (conductive fabrics, yarns, etc.) to create expressive objects and interactive fashions. Technologies are not merely exterior aids, but interior changes of consciousness. They affect how we understand ourselves by co-structuring possibilities of thought. The focus of this course will be interaction and interrelationship between soft technologies and bodies. There are no prerequisites – introductory electronics and sewing techniques will be reviewed. Fulfills Non * Intemediate Production or Media Study Elective

 

DMS 435 NARRATIVE SCRIPTWRITING
Henderson :: MW 9:00am – 10:50am :: CFA 235
Reg #252366

This course gives students first-hand experience with all the primary aspects and stages of preproduction planning (scriptwriting, storyboarding, and structural diagramming) of a feature film. Script analysis will be a major component of the course. Open to DMS majors who passed portfolio and for Critical Studies majors who obtain permission of instructor. Fulfills Non * Intermediate Production

 

DMS 442 ADVANCED VIDEO PRODUCTION
Caplan :: TR 1:00pm – 2:50pm :: CFA 232
Reg #077318

This course is a very hands-on introduction to the real world of the producing and exhibiting video maker. It focuses on some of our most central and troubling creative problems: What kind of project should I make, and why? How do I organize my project? How important is our cultural environment for our work? Is it important to create as individuals or in groups? And what do I do with my work when it’s “done”? In this course each individual will develop their own approach to the production of video projects; some will do work that can be completed quickly (preferred!), others will work on longer projects. Some will work alone, others in groups. Much of the class time will be devoted to observing one another’s working processes and progress. Each student will be responsible for discussing or showing their work or ideas, or presenting a summary of an assigned topic, during a four-minute time slot each week. In addition, there will be lectures, workshops, and discussions of technical and aesthetic issues including advanced editing, audio, and special effects. Other course activities (productions, showings, field trips) are also an option. Students will use both studio and field production equipment, and will work on nonlinear editing facilities. There is a lab fee for Advanced Video, in addition to which the student should plan for up to $100 in additional costs, including a standard video production text for reference. Regular and punctual attendance at course meetings is mandatory. Grades are based on the number of classroom presentations made (60%), personal progress in work completed (25%), participatory attendance (7.5%), and periodic quizzes on course topics (7.5%). Lab Fee $100. Fulfills * Advanced Production

 

DMS 455 GENDER AND FILM
Goldman :: R 6:00pm – 9:40pm :: CFA 112
Reg # 261049

In this course we will explore the history, theory and practice of women, gender and film. We will pay special attention to the way stories by and about women are told. The class will begin with an historical and theoretical overview of women and film, exploring the work of early women directors as well as foundational concepts in women’s film theory. Built into the middle of the course will be the six week Buffalo International Women’s Film Festival which students will attend for free at the Market Arcade Cinema. The latter part of the course will feature contemporary women directors as we consider how earlier films, directors, theory and sociohistorical developments have or have not influenced issues in present day work. Additionally we will consider the rise of queer film and the ways that has impacted representations and understandings of gender.
The course will consider these and other areas of inquiry:
Why is it necessary that we have a class focusing on women and film?

 

How are women framed in, through and by film?

 

Why do such representations matter?

 

How do they inform our understanding of gender in our everyday lives?

 

How have scholars understood them?

 

How have women filmmakers challenged, shaped and changed the form, content and style of movies?

 

What happens to the concept of the woman filmmaker when gender is destabilized?
Students will be actively involved in exploring these concepts as we compare, contrast and critique an international selection of mainstream, independent and experimental fiction and non-fiction films made by women. In several cases the film directors will be present for the screenings. Course work will include readings, engaged and active class participation, journals entries, discussion leadership and a research paper on a topic of the student’s choice. Graduate students will be required to write two additional short theoretical papers as well as a longer final research paper. Fulfills Advanced Analysis or Media & Culture or Media Study Elective

 

 

DMS 462 GAME DESIGN
Pape :: TR 11:00am – 12:50pm :: CFA 242
Reg# 071969

This is a course in videogame design. We are less concerned with becoming videogame developers and more concerned with becoming videogame designers. Of course, the boundaries between the two practices are not discreet, and we will, as a practice of creating good game design, create, i.e. develop, games. In our exploration of game design, we will look at several gametypes, starting with traditional board games and working our way through major movements in videogame design. We will consult critical texts to illuminate our discussions of these games, as well as to provide us with direction in our own game experiments. Students will divide into game design teams to complete the bulk of the coursework. Students are expected to perform their responsibilities to the team to the best of their abilities, and peer evaluations will be used in determining each student’s individual grade. Students in this course are expected to be driven and possess a great deal of personal initiative. This is not a course where students are hand-fed the skills they need to carry out their creative vision. Rather, students will depend greatly on their existing skills and the skills of their teammates. Fulfills Non * Intermediate Production

 

DMS 463 INTERACTIVE FICTION
Anstey :: TR 1:00pm – 2:50pm :: CFA 235
Reg# 188710

Video games encompass an increasingly diverse set of practices, populations, and locations–from fantasy football to multi-player medieval fantasy; from simulations of real life to alternate realities; from fanatics to activists; from nightclubs to competitive arenas to public streets to the classroom; from consoles to mobile phones to large-screen projections. In this course we will analyze not only popular games but interactive installations, pervasive games, mixed and virtual reality environments. We will discuss the interdisciplinary nature of a cultural practice which depends on art, artificial intelligence, computer graphics, interface design, human-computer interaction, psychology, narrative, networking and technical innovation. We will ask why interactive experiences are popular, and try to understand the social and cultural implications of games and gaming. This course can be applied towards your Advanced Analysis and Electives requirements in either Production or Critical Studies. REQUIRED for the Games Studies Certificate.Fulfills Non * Intermediate Production or Advanced Analysis

 

DMS 484 LANGUAGE MEDIA POETICS
Glazier:: MW 3pm-4:50pm :: CFA 235
Reg#053876

Focuses on language media practice, including procedural practices, computer-assisted techniques, and the application of language material as data. . A key component of our approach will be to enhance multimedia digital and digital poetry production.Fulfills Advanced Analysis or Media Study Elective

 

 

DMS 485 MEDIA ROBOTICS 2
Bohlen:: MW 11am-12:50pm :: CFA 246
Reg#257996

This course addresses data acquisition and processing in the context of digital media arts. Understanding sensors and their limitations is an important prerequisite to building robust and satisfying information processing artifacts. This course will allow students to better understand both the concepts as well as the techniques underlying a variety of sensor typologies and various data acquisition approaches.
While the course covers technical materials, the goal of the course is to uncover new possibilities with which students can investigate digital data and imagery. As opposed to courses that manipulate image data through commercial applications such as Photoshop, this course works with general purpose programing and mathematical tools that offer opportunities and freedoms prepackaged software solutions deny. Course materials include readings in perception theory, sensor design, fundamentals of machine vision as well as documentation of select art works that engage in various fashions in advanced sensing methods.http://www.acsu.buffalo.edu/~mrbohlen/machinevision.html Fulfills * Advanced Production

 

DMS 496 (1- 4 CR VARIABLE) MEDIA ARTS INTERNSHIP
Staff
REG#Permission of Instructor

Media Study majors have the opportunity to gain variable academic credit for internships in local and national media production companies, television stations, cable companies, and media access centers. This is an unpaid internship available to majors. Guidelines are set by an internship supervisor in collaboration with a faculty sponsor to provide hands-on practical experience in an on-the-job training program. For registration info, see Nancy King in 231 CFA. Media Study Elective

 

DMS 499 (1-4 CR VARIABLE) INDEPENDENT STUDY
Staff
REG#Permission of Instructor

Students may arrange for special courses of study with faculty through “Independent Study.” The instructor will set the guidelines for the course on an individual basis. It permits the student to study, independently, in an area where no course is given. Syllabus for Independent Study should be prepared prior to semester, signed by the instructor, with one copy on file with the department. For registration info, see Nancy King in 231 CFA. Lab fee for production work: $100 Media Study Elective