Fall 2009

Undergraduate Course Listings (Archived)

DMS 101A BASIC FILM MAKING
Staff :: MW 9:00am -10:50am :: CFA 286
REG#117704

This course is intended to provide a basic introduction to 16mm film production. Classes will include screenings, lectures, and demonstrations. Students will learn basic camera operation, lighting, editing, and sound acquisition. In addition, the course will explore the critical relationship between theory and practice in the context of film production. Students will be required to complete collaborative class projects, individual assignments, and a critical paper. Each student will also be required to complete a short, non-sync, 16mm film project. Class materials will cost approx. $150. Lab fee: $100. Class size is strictly limited. Fulfills Basic Production Requirement

 

DMS 101B BASIC FILM MAKING
Staff :: TR 11:00am -12:50pm :: CFA 286
REG#193524

This course is intended to provide a basic introduction to 16mm film production. Classes will include screenings, lectures, and demonstrations. Students will learn basic camera operation, lighting, editing, and sound acquisition. In addition, the course will explore the critical relationship between theory and practice in the context of film production. Students will be required to complete collaborative class projects, individual assignments, and a critical paper. Each student will also be required to complete a short, non-sync, 16mm film project. Class materials will cost approx. $150. Lab fee: $100. Class size is strictly limited. Fulfills Basic Production Requirement

 

DMS 103A BASIC VIDEO
Staff :: MW 3:00pm – 4:50pm :: CFA 286
REG#003989

This course is a basic introduction to the tools and techniques of video production. Students will become familiar with using video and develop strategies for its application as an alternative medium of communication. Crucial to this project is the concurrent development of a critical perspective on mainstream media culture. Video art screenings and readings in media theory will critically address the relations between viewers, producers, and the media. Students must expect to acquire materials and texts costing approx. $50.00 to be used in exercises in classroom presentations. Access to equipment and editing facilities will be available. Lab fee: $100. Class size is strictly limited. Fulfills Basic Production Requirement

 

DMS 103B BASIC VIDEO
Staff :: TR 11:00am – 12:50pm :: CFA 286
REG#112823

This course is a basic introduction to the tools and techniques of video production. Students will become familiar with using video and develop strategies for its application as an alternative medium of communication. Crucial to this project is the concurrent development of a critical perspective on mainstream media culture. Video art screenings and readings in media theory will critically address the relations between viewers, producers, and the media. Students must expect to acquire materials and texts costing approx. $50.00 to be used in exercises in classroom presentations. Access to equipment and editing facilities will be available. Lab fee: $100. Class size is strictly limited. Fulfills Basic Production Requirement

 

DMS 105 BASIC DOCUMENTARY
Staff :: MW 11:00am – 12:50pm :: CFA 232
REG#187322

This course will present students with the fundamental, theoretical, creative, and technical concerns of documentary and video production. Students will be introduced to methods of research, production design, approach to subject, interviewing and the structuring of information, as well as the technical video skills of camera work, sound recording, and lighting and editing, as they apply specifically to the documentary process. The demands of documentary expression require preparation with a different emphasis from that which applies to the personal and experimental approaches to filmmaking and video making. Materials and texts will cost approx. $50. Lab fee: $100. Class size is strictly limited. Fulfills Basic Production Requirement

 

DMS 107 FILM HISTORY I
Staff :: MW 11:00am – 12:50pm :: CFA 232
REG#121539

This course will introduce students to cinema from its technological and cultural origins in the late nineteenth century through the era of silent cinema, the development of sound film (“the talkie”) in the late 1920s, up to the end of WWII in 1945. This course will closely examine the technological innovations of cinema in the first half of the twentieth century and their effect on the development of narrative form and film style. We will further consider films in their socio-historical contexts in order to understand the dynamic relations among the early cinema’s technological, cultural, and aesthetic development.  Since this course may also serve as an introduction to film interpretation, we will pay close attention to the construction of the moving image and the ideological implications behind that image. Fulfills Intro To Interpretation Requirement

DMS 109 FILM INTERPRETATION
Staff :: MW 11:00am – 12:50pm :: CFA 235
REG#174974

Film Aesthetics have had an enormous impact on the development of media, from television to the internet to video games, as well as on our personal experiences of our everyday lives: “I feel like I’m in a movie!” This course provides an introduction to the main concepts and themes that constitute the rapidly expanding field of Film Studies.  In this course, we will learn to recognize the techniques and conventions that structure our experience of cinema – narrative, mise-en-scene, cinematography, editing, sound, genre – in order to understand how these various components combine to yield an overall sense of film form. We will survey global film history, critically viewing examples of silent film, classical Hollywood, world cinema, experimental, documentary, and independent narrative film. We will also examine isolated clips from a variety of films as they relate to the weekly discussion topics. Fulfills Intro To Interpretation Requirement

 

DMS 110 PROGRAMMING FOR DIGITAL ART
Staff :: MW 9:00am – 11:50am :: CFA 242
REG#417036

Beginner programming course geared towards Media Study majors with little to no experience who want to pursue Programming Graphics, Game Design and Virtual Reality. This course introduces basic concepts of Computer Science with the Python programming language, while incorporating a Media Study perspective.  Non Majors welcome if space available. Fulfills Basic Production Requirement

 

DMS 121A BASIC DIGITAL ARTS
Staff :: MW 9:00pm – 10:50am :: CFA 244
REG#361686

This course will present fundamental concepts and methods that underlie the use of computers in generating and processing digital works and examine them in the context of contemporary artistic practice in painting, photography, film, and video. The impact of computers, both present and potential, on the more traditional arts will be discussed. Through the use of imaging audio and presentation software, students will explore the various ways in which computers deal with images, sound and structures, adapting these methods to produce work of their own. Work by contemporary artists working in the digital medium will be shown and examined on a regular basis. The class size is strictly limited. Lab fee: $100. Fulfills Basic Production Requirement

 

DMS 121B BASIC DIGITAL ARTS
Staff :: TR 1:00pm – 2:50pm :: CFA 244
REG#009736

This course will present fundamental concepts and methods that underlie the use of computers in generating and processing digital works and examine them in the context of contemporary artistic practice in painting, photography, film, and video. The impact of computers, both present and potential, on the more traditional arts will be discussed. Through the use of imaging audio and presentation software, students will explore the various ways in which computers deal with images, sound and structures, adapting these methods to produce work of their own. Work by contemporary artists working in the digital medium will be shown and examined on a regular basis. The class size is strictly limited. Lab fee: $100. Fulfills Basic Production Requirement

 

DMS 155 (LECTURE) INTRODUCTION TO NEW MEDIA
Staff :: T 9:00pm – 10:50am :: CFA 112
REG# xxxxxx(Register for a lab, this will enroll you for the lecture as well)

DMS 155 A1 (LAB) INTRODUCTION TO NEW MEDIA
Staff :: R 9:00pm – 10:50am :: CFA 244
REG#330645

DMS 155 A2 (LAB) INTRODUCTION TO NEW MEDIA
Staff :: TR 11:00am – 12:50pm :: CFA 244
REG#101342

This course provides an introduction to design and the production of interactive multimedia. The content of the class will focus on the theoretical and practical aspects of creating and integrating digital media with authoring/presentation tools. This class will lay the foundation for creating interactive projects for the web and CD-ROMS, and will integrate art, journalism, and music through hands-on developmental projects in our new state-of-the-art Mac lab. Students will learn the process and skills necessary to create a web site and an interactive CD-ROM which integrates animation, graphic design, sound, and text, working in Adobe Photoshop, Macromedia Dreamweaver, Flash animation, Sound Edit 16, and Illustrator. The course will accommodate 48 students. Enroll now! Get the technological edge! Lab fee $100. Fulfills Basic Production Requirement

 

DMS 193 KLE INTRO TO JOURNALISM
Kleinberg Biehl, J :: TR 11:00am – 12:50pm :: CLEMEN 1030
REG#237721

Fulfills Media Study Elective

 

DMS 212 BHW INDIAN IMAGE ON FILM
White, B J :: M 4:30pm – 7:20pm :: CLEMEN 17
REG#288993

Cross listed with the American Studies Department: please see their website for more information. May be applied toward DMS Media & Culture or Elective requirements for 3 credits. Fulfills Media Study Elective

 

DMS 213 IMMIGRATION & FILM
Douglas :: TR 11:00am – 12:50pm :: CFA 112
REG#235785

This course focuses on fundamental aspects of immigration in the United States and abroad by examining representative examples of films and documentaries. This semester we will focus on three main aspects of immigration and film (1) political immigration, (2) economic immigration and (3) forced migration and displacement. In addition, we will investigate four major sub-topics related to that issue i.e.; (1) representation of race and ethnicity in film, (2) cultural identity and its reciprocal relationship with cinema, (3) the common narrative of movement, be it geographic or social/economic and (4) tensions between assimilation and cultural diversity. Several themes will be examined repeatedly throughout the semester the various ways first, second and third generations experience immigration; social cultural integration and/or assimilation and cultural diversity. Attendance is mandatory. Non-majors welcome. Fulfills the American Pluralism requirement or Media and Culture or Media Study Elective

 

DMS 215 INTERMEDIATE SOUND ART
Thompson :: TR 1:00pm – 2:50pm :: CFA 286
REG#153311

This course is designed to give students a theoretical, historical and practical introduction to sound as a creative medium. Sound art is a broad discipline that is inherently interdisciplinary, with strong roots in modern music, installation and performance art. Through a series of readings, discussions, and collaborations, we will investigate the ways that sound influences our understanding of public space. We will also examine the work of contemporary artists that use sound as a relational medium through interactive technologies and participation-based practices. Students will have the opportunity to create experimental installations through self-directed Lab Projects. Non * Intermediate Production

 

DMS 218 INTRODUCTION TO ANIMATION
Chouinard :: MW 1:00pm – 2:50pm :: CFA 265
REG#421974

Intro to Animation is an intensive, production based course in which animated motion is studied and applied in a wide variety of non-computer based techniques including: pencil and paper, cut-outs, rotoscoping, stop-motion, pixelation, camera-less, paint on glass, etc. The student will be expected to complete several short animated excercises incorporating the techniques covered in the course. Non * Intermediate Production

 

 

DMS 225 DIGITAL LITERATURE SURVEY
Glazier/Scime :: MW 3:00pm – 4:50pm :: CFA 232
REG#023610

This course offers students the opportunity to conduct an intensive survey of the field of digital literature through a focus on the screening of digital texts. Primary emphasis will be on “reading” the digital texts presented. Course will also cover the relationship of innovative poetry to digital media, the phenomenon of the Internet and its relation to “the I”, meaning-making through the context, design, and writerly qualities of Web pages, traditions of hypertext, the materiality of code, the history of e-poetry, and digital media poetry in the academy. Special attention will be given to understanding a broad range of innovative works in the medium including hypertext, digital and kinetic literature, interactive texts, and works in networked and programmable media, and to examining, interpreting, and interrogating the key theoretical texts of the most significant practitioners in the field. The course will include foundational early theory, writings from formative scholarly hypertext theorists, and work by more recent cutting-edge independent digital theorists. Attention will be given to the role of programming as a social, literary, and language-related act. The cultural impact of films related to programming/cyberculture will be discussed, with film screenings as appropriate. Discussion of key literary, cybercultural and media theory authors as relevant. Online texts as appropriate, especially for a sense of current research in the field. Course Requirements: midterm, final exam. Students are encouraged to keep a screening journal. Text:Digital Poetics: the Making of E-Poetries (Glazier) Fulfills Intro to Interpretation or Media Study Elective

 

DMS 259 INTRO TO MEDIA ANALYSIS
Staff :: TR 9:00am – 10:50am :: CFA 235
REG#281247

This introductory course to Media Analysis examines the rise of especially visual mass media in the 20 th century, from photography, television, and film, to new media. It pays close attention to media historical moments, such as fascism and film in post world war II Italy, or the postmodern turn with the event of digitality. Due to the urgency of political events, we will closely analyze the current media-war-coverage considering mainstream as well as independent media discourses. The respective media are analyzed in light of their materiality. Methodologies vary between Ideology-critique, Cultural Studies, Political Theory, Postmodern Theory, and Semiotics. Students will write essay exams based on course lectures and essays from the course reader. Fulfills Intro to Interpretation or Media Study Elective

 

DMS 303 CON VIDEO ANALYSIS 1
Conrad, A S :: TR 3:00pm – 12:50pm :: CFA 278
REG#146016

Video Analysis is a survey of historical and contemporary practices in video, with an emphasis on the work of independent media artists. Since this course is centered upon a body of work that is not widely distributed, much class time will be devoted to critical viewings of video works. This means that much of the informational substance of the course must be supplied by the readings, which will include a large course packet and two textbooks. A part of this course will be conducted by remote learning by the instructor, from studio, gallery, and other sites in New York and Europe. A series of short essays will be assigned throughout the semester. Students who have taken DMS 304, the spring semester of Video Analysis, may expect a change of emphasis and content in DMS 303. Grades will be based on the essays (65%) and regular attendance (35%), which is mandatory. Fulfills Advanced Analysis or Media and Culture or Media Study Elective

 

DMS 315 WEB PROGRAMMING
Pape, D E :: MW 11:00am – 12:50pm :: CFA 242
REG#359819

This course will provide students with an introduction to web-based script programming. It will examine the scripting and database tools that are used to create modern, dynamic web sites. Students will learn to use open source systems such as PHP, MySQL, and Apache. Other topics will include application development with current “Web 2.0” sites such as Google Maps, Flickr, and Facebook. Students are expected to have background experience in either programming or web design (HTML, CSS, etc). $100 lab fee. Non * Intermediate Production

 

DMS 341 INTERMEDIATE VIDEO WORKSHOP
Bouquard, M J :: MW 11:00am – 12:50 :: CFA 286
REG#435890 PR: DMS 103, 104, 105, or 106

In this course, students will explore and experiment with the video medium through a series of short exercises. Improvement of technical knowledge and skills will be emphasized, and creativity encouraged. Topics to be explored will include: video camera, advanced shooting techniques, sound gathering techniques, microphone placement and selection, non-linear sound editing, lighting techniques for studio and location, non-linear editing. Students learn properties of audio, video and still assets, and practice importing, logging, and insert assembly editing. They also develop a sensitivity to the unique aesthetic and usability criteria of digital video in application environments. Fulfills * Intermediate Production

 

DMS 400 FILM AND CINEMATOGRAPHY
Caplan, E B :: TR 3:00pm – 4:50pm :: CFA 286
REG#061650

This is an advanced film production course designed for students who have successfully completed the intermediate film production class and have produced at least one short 16mm film. This course will explore the key components of independent production. Students will develop a major project from pre-production through the initial stages of post-production. Students are required to come to the class with an initial concept for a substantive project to be completed during the spring semester. Students will maintain a journal, produce a pre-production package, produce a production book and a fine cut of their final film project. In Addition, students will make a short autobiographical film and explore Narrative, Documentary, and Experimental elements in filmmaking. Students can expect to spend $450 for materials and processing for the course. Students will receive some assistance with supplies and film stock. Fulfills * Intermediate Production

 

DMS 402 ADVANCED EDITING
Elder, S M :: TR 3:00pm – 4:50pm :: CFA 235
REG#333068

Why do cuts work or not work?  This production seminar looks at essential principals of editing and explores the theoretical, practical, and creative editing concerns of film and video artists.  The class is designed for anyone working in narrative or alternative fiction, documentary, or experimental media either in video or film.  Students will study advanced editing techniques learning how to fine cut their own work with some practice in creative editing design assignments.  We will explore the nature of an edit, and examples of good cutting.  Students will read essential editing theory including classics by Murch, Eisenstein, Cancyger, and Hollyn.  The class will study and practice pacing, time cuts, rhythm, dramatic arch, multiple audio tracts, continuity and discontinuity, match cuts, story building, layering sound FX, editing room management, dialogue editing, anti-narrative, and the influence of dreaming.  Guest editors will also visit and lecture on their work.  Students must have previous editing experience and preferably bring raw footage or an edited rough cut project on which they would like to work during the semester.  Each student will have different challenges depending on his/her genre-fiction, experimental, or documentary.  Students will work with Final Cut Pro, and students who wish to can also work on the 8 plate film Steenbeck.  Prerequisites for Undergrads are DMS 341, passed portfolio review and persmission of instructor.  Class size is limited.  Lab fee $100. Fulfills Advanced Production

 

DMS 409 NON-FICTION FILM
Elder, S M :: TR 11:00am – 12:50pm :: CFA 235
REG#037172

This course examines popular American documentary films looking at diverse representations of American culture. We explore independent award-winning contemporary works with themes of gender, ethnicity, popular music, sexual orientation, murder, justice, rock stars, racism, disability and history. Particular focus is on the curious relationship between the images of reality and reality itself, and on America’s love affair with reality media. Emphasis is placed on understanding the thin shifting line between fiction and non-fiction and challenging the notion of documentary “truth.” Students develop analytical and interpretive media skills that are applicable to all film and video. Students learn non-fiction critical theory including Nichols, Winston, Ruby, and Renov and analyze artistic elements of non-fiction film and video including visual narrativity, storytelling, spontaneous camera work, editing, audio, and common elements for artistic and commercial success. The class explores different documentary styles including experimental docs, cinema verite, fake docs, diary and reflexive docs, collaborative making and cutting edge contemporary work. We address the ethical and artistic considerations of filming real people and real communities. Works of Wiseman, Pennebaker, Kopple, Maysles, Freidrich, O’Rourke, Riggs, Morris, and more. Attendance is required as well as two papers and a take-home exam. Be prepared to see a lot of great films! Fulfills Media and Culture or Adavced Analysis or Media Study Elective

 

DMS 412 THEORY OF FILM NARRATIVE
Henderson, B R :: MW 9:00am – 10:50am :: CFA 235
REG#196970

This course is an exploration of the principal theories of film through a critical reading of texts and a close examination of films. The texts to be perused comprise several groups. Classical film theory includes Munsterburg, Kuleshov, Pudovkin, Eisenstein, Balasz, Arnheim, Bazin, and Godard. The critique of classical film theory includes Burch, Perkins, and Henderson. The course will also explore semiotics, psychoanalysis, and poststructuralism, in Barthes, Eco, Metz , Pasolini, Baudry, Heath, and in feminist film theory, including Gledhill, Mulvey, Silverman, Modleski, Doane, and Studlar. A section on avant-garde theory will include Vertov, Epstein, Deren, Brakhage, Sitney, and Michelson. These topic areas will be set in interaction throughout: e.g., Soviet editing and antirealism are continued in the avant-garde; rhetorical figures such as metaphor, metonymy, ellipsis, condensation, and displacement, can be traced in very different theoretical contexts and in close readings of individual films. Fulfills Advanced Analysis or Media Study Elective

 

DMS 415 CONSIOUSNESS & COGNITION: FACT & FANTASY
Anstey, J R :: TR 1:00pm – 2:50pm :: CFA 235
REG#257098

We produce media for conscious minds – human minds. But what is a mind? What is consciousness? what is cognition? In this seminar we will examine and experience works by artists and scientists that specifically attempt to understand the mind; to make a model of the mind; to represent and explain the mind; to mess with the mind. Texts will include: Origins of the Modern Mind: Three stages in the evolution of culture and cognition; Flight of the Mind: Virginia Woolf’s Art and Manic-Depressive Illness; Erazorhead; Total Recall; Katamari Damasy; and works by Virginia Woolf, Patricia Highsmith, Carlos Castaneda, Sigmund Freud, Alfred Hitchcock and Will Wright. Fulfills Advanced Analysis or Media Study Elective

 

DMS 417 FILMIC TEXT
Henderson, B R :: MW 1:00pm – 2:50pm :: CFA 235
REG#285058

This course is concerned with the diverse roles that theory has played in various close readings of film.  Those theories usually organize the energies of the text.  Tracing this process is another goal of the course.  Approaches that contextualize a film contrast with other, shorter approaches.  We will look at select shorter articles that are excellent at what they do.  There will be a close analysis of the 1970 “Collective Text by the Editors of Cahiers Du Cinema: John Ford’s Young Mr. Lincon (1939).”  It may not be too much to say that this reading launched perhaps a dozen and a half of other readings.  These include Charles Eckert’s reading of Marked Woman, Stephen Heath’s reading of Touch of Evil, Virginia Wright Wexman’s reading of Vertigo, Brian Henderson’s reading of The Searchers, Esther C.M. Yau on Yellow Eart, and David Ehrenstein’s reading of Desert Fury.  This course is an Advanced Analysis course or can also be used as an Elective. Fulfills Advanced Analysis or Media Study Elective

 

DMS 419 INTERMEDIATE DIGITAL ARTS PRODUCTION
Staff :: MW 1:00pm – 2:50pm :: CFA 244
REG#410631

Fulfills * Intermediate Production

 

DMS 422 MOVEMENT DOCUMENTATION
Caplan, E B :: W 1:00pm – 4:00pm :: CFA 278
REG# xxxxxx(Register for a lab, this will enroll you for the lecture as well)

Dance in media enjoys wide recognition in world culture and in art practice. The Department of Media Study and Department of Theater and Dance propose a joint course in learning how to document performance for camera. This intensive production class will be co-taught in two separate studio locations by Elliot Caplan, Professor/Film, and Melanie Aceto, Assistant Professor/Dance. DMS students will have the opportunity to observe and document Modern 5 dance technique class with cameras for the purpose of learning how to photograph the moving body in space. Through weekly, repeated exposure to selected movement phrases, students will collect, create and assemble edited movement sequences. Students will be guided in the recording process step-by-step through lecture demos by both professors to include camera-specific activities as related to theatrical performing space, exercises in perception, looking at dance and learning its terms through choreographic tools including change of space, relative front, force, repetition, and solo vs. group/unison/cannon. Selected films will be screened and discussed as well as examples from painting, photography and architecture. Students will be given the opportunity to explore the world of dance on film. Fulfills * Intermediate Production

 

DMS 422 (LAB) MOVEMENT DOCUMENTATION
Caplan, E B :: W 4:01pm – 4:40pm :: CFA 278
REG#219990

Dance in media enjoys wide recognition in world culture and in art practice. The Department of Media Study and Department of Theater and Dance propose a joint course in learning how to document performance for camera. This intensive production class will be co-taught in two separate studio locations by Elliot Caplan, Professor/Film, and Melanie Aceto, Assistant Professor/Dance. DMS students will have the opportunity to observe and document Modern 5 dance technique class with cameras for the purpose of learning how to photograph the moving body in space. Through weekly, repeated exposure to selected movement phrases, students will collect, create and assemble edited movement sequences. Students will be guided in the recording process step-by-step through lecture demos by both professors to include camera-specific activities as related to theatrical performing space, exercises in perception, looking at dance and learning its terms through choreographic tools including change of space, relative front, force, repetition, and solo vs. group/unison/cannon. Selected films will be screened and discussed as well as examples from painting, photography and architecture. Students will be given the opportunity to explore the world of dance on film.Fulfills * Intermediate Production

 

DMS 423 (LECTURE) PROGRAMMING GRAPHICS 1
Pape, D E :: T 11:00am – 12:50pm :: CFA 242
REG# xxxxxx(Register for the lab, this will enroll you for the lecture as well)

This production course will introduce students to the concepts and practice of programming 3D computer graphics and audio using OpenGL and other libraries. The major focus will be on creating interactive art or games experiences by programming both graphics and sound. The course has three goals: to demystify computer code – we get behind the Graphic User Interface to the machine below; to explore the potential of programming – writing our own code means we can create customized computer tools as well as customized visuals; and to teach the fundamentals of graphics programming. Prerequisites are experience in a programming language such as Python, C, C++, or Java (DMS 121, CSE 113/4/5 or equivalent). Permission of Instructor required. Lab fee $100. Contact: dave.pape@acm.org Fulfills Intermediate Production

 

DMS 423 (LAB) PROGRAMMING GRAPHICS 1
Pape, D E : : R 11:00am – 12:50pm :: CFA 242
REG#226864

 

DMS 434 RESPONSIVE MEDIA
Conrad, E. :: TR 3:00pm – 4:50pm :: CFA 244
REG#347382

This course will introduce the tools and techniques for authoring real-time media systems with Max/MSP/Jitter.  Max is a graphical programming environment designed to handle the basic elements of media: time, interactivity, and control.  MSP adds the ability capture, synthesize and manipulate audio, while Jitter does the same for video and more.  Although the course will emphasize work that utilizes real-time computation–live video or sound art, interactive work, installation or performance–students may choose to apply the tools towards the creation of more traditional, or non-real-time, works such as generative, genetic or evolutionary compositions of sound and/or image.  No previous experience with Max or computer programming is required, but some background in media production (video, animation, sound or music) will be very helpful.  This course will satisfy the non (*) Intermediate Production course. Pre-reqs:  DMS 103 orDMS 105.  $100 Lab fee. Non * Intermediate Production

 

DMS 448 GAME STUDIES COLLOQUIUM
Anstey, J R :: MW 1:00pm – 2:50pm :: CFA 232
REG#433672

Video games encompass an increasingly diverse set of practises, populations, locations – from fantasy football to multi-player medieval fantasy; from simulations of real life to alternate realities; from fanatics to activists; from nightclubs to competitive arenas to public streets to the classroom; from consoles to mobile phones to large-screen projections. In this course we will analyze not only popular games but interactive installations, pervasive games, mixed and virtual reality environments. We will discuss the interdisciplinary nature of a cultural practice which depends on art, artificial intelligence, computer graphics, interface design, human-computer interaction, psychology, narrative, networking and technical innovation. We will ask why interactive experiences are popular, and try to understand the social and cultural implications of games and gaming. Fulfills Advanced Analysis or Media Study Elective

 

DMS 456 (LAB) MEDIA ROBOTICS 3
Bohlen, M :: W 11:00am – 12:50pm :: CFA 246
REG#xxxxxx(Register for a seminar, this will enroll you for the lecture as well)

 

DMS 456 (SEMINAR) MEDIA ROBOTICS 3
Bohlen, M :: M 11:00am – 12:50pm :: CFA 246
REG#111004

This semester’s version of MediaRobotics III will address the problem of finding meaning in large and diverse sources of information. Product recommendations, social bookmarking, and matchmaking all rely on finding patterns in large amounts of data. Sometimes truly interesting details emerge from data collected from large groups, whether they be people, animals, plants, weather patterns, bacteria, or genes. The knowledge gained from large groups is sometimes referred to as collective intelligence. This course will introduce students to the strange things that emerge from the collaboration and competition of many individuals.
The course will deal with concepts, methods and computational procedures that allow one to address collective intelligence phenomena. Students should expect a challenging course that will open new venues for creative and analytical work. We will work with the open source programming language python for the programing assignments. Prerequisite: MediaRobotics I, Physical Computing or consent of instructor.nalysis or Media Study Elective

 

 

Fulfills Advanced Production

 

DMS 464 INSTALLATION: URBAN SPACE
Chen, M :: MW 3:15pm – 5:45pm :: CFA B13
REG#025258

Advanced Production

 

DMS 485 MEDIA ROBOTICS 1
Shepard, M W :: W 1:00pm – 4:40pm :: CFA 246
REG#Permission of Instructor

This course is dedicated to understanding data and data acquisition in the context of digital media arts. Reliably acquiring and interpreting data from external devices is an important part of building non-trivial behaving artifacts. This course will allow students to better understand both the concepts as well as the techniques underlying a variety of data acquisition methods. The course will expose students to fundamental ideas behind sensing, sensor design and sensor interfaces. A substantial part of the course is dedicated to machine vision, an area of active research in both the engineering sciences as well as the arts. Course materials include readings in perception theory, sensor design, fundamentals of machine vision as well as documentation of select art works that engage in advanced sensing methods. Our lab has a wide array of sensor types, an industry grade commercial machine vision library as well as an open source research grade vision library, small footprint microprocessor based ccd cameras, ieee1394 compliant digital cameras, analogue video cameras with fast frame grabber cards and an open source C++ programming environment. With this infrastructure and instructor guidance, students will be able to explore all aspects of data collection. http://www.acsu.buffalo.edu/~mrbohlen/machinevision.html Fulfills * Intermediate Production

 

DMS 496 (1- 4 CR VARIABLE) MEDIA ARTS INTERNSHIP
Staff
REG#Permission of Instructor

Media Study majors have the opportunity to gain variable academic credit for internships in local and national media production companies, television stations, cable companies, and media access centers. This is an unpaid internship available to majors. Guidelines are set by an internship supervisor in collaboration with a faculty sponsor to provide hands-on practical experience in an on-the-job training program. For registration info, see Nancy King in 231 CFA. Media Study Elective

 

DMS 499 (1-4 CR VARIABLE) INDEPENDENT STUDY
Staff
REG#Permission of Instructor

Students may arrange for special courses of study with faculty through “Independent Study.” The instructor will set the guidelines for the course on an individual basis. It permits the student to study, independently, in an area where no course is given. Syllabus for Independent Study should be prepared prior to semester, signed by the instructor, with one copy on file with the department. For registration info, see Nancy King in 231 CFA. Lab fee for production work: $100 Media Study Elective