Spring 2014

DMS 101 Basic Film Making
Staff :: T R , 1:00 – 2:50 PM :: CFA286
REG# 22224

This course is intended to provide a basic introduction to 16mm film production. Classes will include screenings, lectures, and demonstrations. Students will learn basic camera operation, lighting, editing, and sound acquisition. In addition, the course will explore the critical relationship between theory and practice in the context of film production. Students will be required to complete collaborative class projects, individual assignments, and a critical paper. Each student will also be required to complete a short, non-sync, 16mm film project. Class materials will cost approx. $150. Lab fee: $100. Class size is strictly limited. Fulfills Basic Production Requirement.

DMS 103A Basic Video
Staff :: MW 9:00 – 10:50AM :: CFA 286
REG#18275

This course is a basic introduction to the tools and techniques of video production. Students will become familiar with using video and develop strategies for its application as an alternative medium of communication. Crucial to this project is the concurrent development of a critical perspective on mainstream media culture. Video art screenings and readings in media theory will critically address the relations between viewers, producers, and the media. Students must expect to acquire materials and texts costing approx. $50.00 to be used in exercises in classroom presentations. Access to equipment and editing facilities will be available. Lab fee: $100. Class size is strictly limited. Fulfills Basic Production Requirement.

DMS 103B Basic Video
Staff :: TR 9:00am-10:50pm :: CFA 235
REG#12135
This cours
e is a basic introduction to the tools and techniques of video production. Students will become familiar with using video and develop strategies for its application as an alternative medium of communication. Crucial to this project is the concurrent development of a critical perspective on mainstream media culture. Video art screenings and readings in media theory will critically address the relations between viewers, producers, and the media. Students must expect to acquire materials and texts costing approx. $50.00 to be used in exercises in classroom presentations. Access to equipment and editing facilities will be available. Lab fee: $100. Class size is strictly limited. Fulfills Basic Production Requirement.

DMS 105A Basic Documentary
Staff :: M/W 11:00am-12:50pm :: CFA 278
REG#15170

This course will present students with the fundamental, theoretical, creative, and technical concerns of documentary and video production. Students will be introduced to methods of research, production design, approach to subject, interviewing and the structuring of information, as well as the technical video skills of camera work, sound recording, and lighting and editing, as they apply specifically to the documentary process. The demands of documentary expression require preparation with a different emphasis from that which applies to the personal and experimental approaches to filmmaking and video making. Materials and texts will cost approx. $50. Lab fee: $100. Class size is strictly limited. Fulfills Basic Production Requirement.

DMS 105B Basic Documentary
Staff :: TR 9:00AM – 10:50AM :: CFA 278
REG#12726

This course will present students with the fundamental, theoretical, creative, and technical concerns of documentary and video production. Students will be introduced to methods of research, production design, approach to subject, interviewing and the structuring of information, as well as the technical video skills of camera work, sound recording, and lighting and editing, as they apply specifically to the documentary process. The demands of documentary expression require preparation with a different emphasis from that which applies to the personal and experimental approaches to filmmaking and video making. Materials and texts will cost approx. $50. Lab fee: $100. Class size is strictly limited. Fulfills Basic Production Requirement.

DMS 107 FILM HISTORY
Staff :: T/TH 11-12:50 :: CFA 112
REG#12962

Film History will expose students to screenings and scholarship chronicling the political and technological conditions of film production from the 1890’s to the present. We will broadly examine early motion pictures, pre-code Hollywood, German Expressionism, French Impressionism and Surrealism, Soviet Montage, Neorealist, the French New Wave, Post-Colonial African filmmaking, 1970’s Hollywood, digital filmmaking, and large format documentary. Attendance, readings, weekly response journal, and research paper are required.

DMS 109 FILM INTERPRETATION
Staff :: TR 9:00am-10:50am :: CFA 112
REG#15841

Film Aesthetics have had an enormous impact on the development of media, from television to the internet to video games, as well as on our personal experiences of our everyday lives: “I feel like I’m in a movie!” This course provides an introduction to the main concepts and themes that constitute the rapidly expanding field of Film Studies. In this course, we will learn to recognize the techniques and conventions that structure our experience of cinema – narrative, mise-en-scene, cinematography, editing, sound, genre – in order to understand how these various components combine to yield an overall sense of film form. We will survey global film history, critically viewing examples of silent film, classical Hollywood, world cinema, experimental, documentary, and independent narrative film. We will also examine isolated clips from a variety of films as they relate to the weekly discussion topics. Fulfills Intro To Interpretation Requirement.

DMS 110 Programming For Digital Art
Staff :: M/W 9-10:50 :: CFA 242
REG#10610

Beginner programming course geared towards Media Study majors with little to no experience who want to pursue Programming Graphics, Game Design and Virtual Reality. This course introduces basic concepts of Computer Science with the Python programming language, while incorporating a Media Study perspective. Non Majors welcome if space available. Lab fee: $100. Fulfills Basic Production Requirement.

DMS 121 Basic Digital Arts
Staff :: MW 11:00am-12:50pm :: CFA 244
REG#11719

This course will present fundamental concepts and methods that underlie the use of computers in generating and processing digital works and examine them in the context of contemporary artistic practice in painting, photography, film, and video. The impact of computers, both present and potential, on the more traditional arts will be discussed. Through the use of imaging audio and presentation software, students will explore the various ways in which computers deal with images, sound and structures, adapting these methods to produce work of their own. Work by contemporary artists working in the digital medium will be shown and examined on a regular basis. The class size is strictly limited. Lab fee: $100. Fulfills Basic Production Requirement.

DMS 121 Basic Digital Arts
Staff :: T/TH 9:00AM – 10:50AM :: CFA 244
REG#18187

This course will present fundamental concepts and methods that underlie the use of computers in generating and processing digital works and examine them in the context of contemporary artistic practice in painting, photography, film, and video. The impact of computers, both present and potential, on the more traditional arts will be discussed. Through the use of imaging audio and presentation software, students will explore the various ways in which computers deal with images, sound and structures, adapting these methods to produce work of their own. Work by contemporary artists working in the digital medium will be shown and examined on a regular basis. The class size is strictly limited. Lab fee: $100. Fulfills Basic Production Requirement.

DMS 155 INTRODUCTION TO NEW MEDIA
Staff :: M/W 1:00pm – 2:50pm :: CFA 244
Lecture REG#15231
Lab REG#15231

This course provides an introduction to design and the production of interactive multimedia. The content of the class will focus on the theoretical and practical aspects of creating and integrating digital media with authoring/presentation tools. This class will lay the foundation for creating interactive projects for the web and will integrate art, journalism, and music through hands-on developmental projects in our new state-of-the-art Mac lab. Students will learn the process and skills necessary to create a web site and an interactive CD-ROM which integrates animation, graphic design, sound, and text, working in Adobe Photoshop, Dreamweaver, Flash animation, and Illustrator. The course will accommodate 48 students. Enroll now! Get the technological edge! Lab fee $100 Fulfills Basic Production Requirement.

DMS 193 Intro To Journalism
Staff :: W 7 – 9:40pm :: location _TBA
reg#1752
6

DMS 200 Visual Studies Speaker Series
Staff :: M 6:30-8:30pm :: CFA112
Reg#21464

DMS 212 Indian Image On Film
Staff :: T 4:10 – 6:50pm :: Location tba
Reg#11135

DMS 213 IMMIGRATION & FILM
Staff :: MW 1:00PM – 2:50PM :: CFA 112
REG#20140

By looking at representative examples of American and foreign films, this course will critically examine the role of cinema in the construction and exploration of the figure of the racial, ethnic, cultural and social theory. Our topics will include (1) racial, ethnic and cultural identity and its reciprocal relationship with cinema, (2) the notion of realism in relation to the representation of race and ethnicity in film, (3) the cinematic representation of inter-ethnic and intra-ethnic conflict, (4) the position of cinema in the debate between assimilation and multiculturalism. Films will be screened in class and discussed against the background of focused critical readings. The aim of the course is to provide you with an opportunity to develop your critical thinking and writing abilities through class discussions, close readings of films and critical literature, and writing assignments. The course fulfills the American Pluralism requirement. Fulfills the American Pluralism requirement or Media and Culture or Media Study Elective.

DMS 213 IMMIGRATION & FILM
Staff :: TR 9:00AM – 10:50PM :: CFA 232
reg#15821

By looking at representative examples of American and foreign films, this course will critically examine the role of cinema in the construction and exploration of the figure of the racial, ethnic, cultural and social theory. Our topics will include (1) racial, ethnic and cultural identity and its reciprocal relationship with cinema, (2) the notion of realism in relation to the representation of race and ethnicity in film, (3) the cinematic representation of inter-ethnic and intra-ethnic conflict, (4) the position of cinema in the debate between assimilation and multiculturalism. Films will be screened in class and discussed against the background of focused critical readings. The aim of the course is to provide you with an opportunity to develop your critical thinking and writing abilities through class discussions, close readings of films and critical literature, and writing assignments. Fulfills the American Pluralism requirement or Media and Culture or Media Study Elective.

DMS 218 Creative Professional Practice
Matt McCormick :: M/W 1-2:50 :: CFA 278
REG#20133

Whether producing independent features or documentaries, directing music videos, or creating advertising or web-content, understanding the behind the scenes process is imperative. “Creative Professional Practice” is a production course that explores the basic components of producing film and video at a professional level and prepares the student for the tumultuous life of a maker. The course introduces the concept of the “creative professional’ and explores the skills, both creative and organizational, one needs to be a successful filmmaker or artist in today’s landscape. We will pull back the curtain to reveal how directors pitch projects, how films are funded, and what steps must be taken for a project to get off the ground. The course will put equal emphasis on both the creative and organizational aspects of motion picture production- breaking down the jobs of both the director and producer, and explore the process of turning the seed of an idea into a completed film or video production. Throughout the course we will produce short video assignments, breakdown scripts and create budgets, learn to write effective treatments and proposals, explore the fund raising process, consider film-set protocol, discuss film festivals and distribution strategies, and engage in creative exercises. Students will work both independently and in groups, and should be
prepared to spend significant time outside of class working on assignments. $100 lab fee.
Prerequisites: Basic Video DMS 103 OR DMS 105 (required) and Intermediate Editing DMS
217 (suggested)
. This course can count towards the “non- *” Intermediate Production course or as an elective.

DMS 259 Intro to Media Analysis
staff :: M/W 11am-12:50pm :: CFA 112
REG#20912

Intro to Media Analysis is an introductory course to Media Analysis examines the rise of especially visual mass media in the 20 th century, from photography, television, and film, to new media. It pays close attention to media historical moments, such as fascism and film in post world war II Italy, or the postmodern turn with the event of digitality. Due to the urgency of political events, we will closely analyze the current media-war-coverage considering mainstream as well as independent media discourses. The respective media are analyzed in light of their materiality. Methodologies vary between Ideology-critique, Cultural Studies, Political Theory, Postmodern Theory, and Semiotics. Students will write essay exams based on course lectures and essays from the course reader. Fulfills Intro to Interpretation.

DMS 341 INTERMEDIATE VIDEO WORKSHOP
Staff :: W – 9am-10:50am :: CFA 278
REG#16959
Prereqs: DMS 103 or 105 and Portfolio
.
In this course, students will explore and experiment with the video medium through a series of short exercises. Improvement of technical knowledge and skills will be emphasized, and creativity encouraged. Topics to be explored will include: video camera, advanced shooting techniques, sound gathering techniques, microphone placement and selection, non-linear sound editing, lighting techniques for studio and location, non-linear editing. Students learn properties of audio, video and still assets, and practice importing, logging, and insert assembly editing. They also develop a sensitivity to the unique aesthetic and usability criteria of digital video in application environments. Lab fee $100. Must take DMS 422 concurrently. Fulfills * Intermediate Production requirement.

DMS 404 Advanced Documentary Prod
Elder :: T/TH 11am-12:50pm :: CFA 235
REG#22113

This course is an advanced workshop in which students create an original documentary project in video (or film, still photography, audio or web-based formats with the permission of instructor). Creativity and originality will be stressed with exercises to encourage “seeing”, “listening” and artistic risk taking. Individual projects may go in many creative directions including the political, personal, humorous, experimental, conventional, transgressive, ethnographic, client-based or activist. Students will gain a solid understanding of contemporary non-fiction forms and the particular problems which non-fiction makers face. Films by contemporary artists will be shown on a regular basis with special attention to experimental documentary work. We will look at dramatic structure, story telling, and narrative/non-narrative forms of editing. Emphasis will be given to production techniques which bring access and intimacy to the video subject and integrity to the documentary. The course will explore ethical issues and problems of privacy and intrusion. Students will develop production skills in research, fieldwork, collaboration, interviewing, location sound recording, camera skills, and production management. Each student will produce one short documentary piece, with supporting assignments in shooting, sound, and digital editing on the Media 100. A written production book will be required. A class film festival ends the semester. Prerequisite: DMS Basic Documentary, or DMS Basic Video and DMS Intermediate Video. Lab fee: $100. Attendance is mandatory. Fulfills Advanced Production.

DMS 411 Film Theory: Introduction through the Senses
Shilina-Conte :: T 3:00PM – 6:40PM :: CFA 235
REG#20136

This course will guide you through the maze of “pre-” and “post-,” “-isms” and “-ships” in film studies, including the theories of authorship and spectatorship, realism, formalism, cognitive criticism, semiotics, psychoanalysis, post-structuralism, feminism and post-feminist studies, as well as the theory of the senses. The assigned readings will include excerpts and articles by Bazin, Eisenstein, Vertov, Baudry, Metz, Balasz, Gunning, Arnheim, Mulvey, Bordwell, Deleuze, Marks, Sobchack, and Naficy, among others. Following Thomas Elsaesser’s enticing approach and focusing on the role of the spectator in cinema, we will study classical and contemporary film theories through the interaction between Moving Image, Senses, Body and Mind as well as such metaphors of filmic experience as Window and Frame, Door and Screen, Mirror and Face. Watching such films as Persona by Bergman, Onibaba by Shindo, Woman in the Dunes by Tashigahara, Stalker by Tarkovsky, The Scent of Green Papaya by Anh Hung Tran, The Hand by Wong Kar Wai and animations by Jan Svankmajer, we will interpret not only the ways we “see” and “hear” films, but also explore them through our senses of touch, smell and even taste. In addition, we will talk about puzzle films, mind-game films (Elsaesser), and forking path films (Bordwell), embracing Gilles Deleuze’s statement of “the brain as the screen.” As Elsaesser points out, “film and spectator are like parasite and host, each occupying the other and being in turn occupied.” This unique approach of confrontation and conflation with the screen through our mind, body and senses will open for us new modes of knowing and representing the world through film and media. This course fulfills the Advanced Analysis, Media and Culture or Media Study Electives.

DMS 415 Media Urbanism
Shepard :: T 1-4:40pm :: cfa232
REG#23732

This hybrid studio-seminar focuses on contemporary media art situated in urban space. Through a series of urban research experiments and transdisciplinary readings, students develop skills to critically engage the city and explore alternative urban activities and experiences enabled by a range of mobile, embedded, pervasive, networked and distributed media, communication and information systems. Drawing on a broader discourse involving the technological mediation of urban life, weekly discussions are organized around readings in social and spatial theory, open systems, participatory structures, computer science, human geography and urban form as well as presentations and analyses of contemporary projects in locative media, ambient informatics, and urban computing. Periodic critiques provide a platform for discussing students’ ongoing project development and prototyping, with an emphasis on producing a project proposal at the end of the semester that can be submitted to exhibition venues and funding organizations. Lab fee $100

DMS 416 Global Media and Culture: Cinema in the Post-media Age
Shilina-Conte :: R 4pm-7:40pm :: CFA 112
REG#21426

“Cinema Is Dead, Long Live Cinema,” Peter Greenaway recently declared. This class will examine a “moving” target, focusing on the current ontology of cinema as it attempts to redefine its status in a “multi-sensory milieu” (Rancière) of digital technologies and emerging media.

As cinema has been uprooted from its former habitat and is being transplanted into the new media ecosystem, will it wither away as an alien species or become acclimatized and blossom in an unprecedented way? The post-cinematic phenomenon already resembles the explosion of a supernova, ranging from definitions of cinema as an “incredibly shrinking medium” (Rodowick) to a “chameleon-like inter-medium” (Petho) and embracing such distribution platforms as the mini-displays of personal mobile devices and gigantic public IMAX screens.

In this class we will become witnesses to cinema’s death(s) and reincarnation(s), as we watch its shape-shifting process from the analog to the digital body. We will probe a host of symptoms, including decomposition, fading, flammability of the film stock, and CGI, digital remastering, and 3-D modeling, that affect the digital cinematic tissue. We will touch upon such topics as database cinema, soft cinema, “suitcase cinema,” multiplex cinema, cinema of attractions and cinema of effects (spectacular cinema), cinema and surveillance, post-media aesthetics, new film history and media archaeology, color and the moving image, and preservation of moving images. We will consider the aesthetic, cultural, and social repercussions promoted by the global media convergence, which entails cardinal shifts in the patterns of production, reception and distribution of cinematic images.

As is the case with all transitional periods, a set of questions arises: Does cinema equal technology and should be understood in the strict sense of medium specificity, or should we adopt a broader approach to cinema as a form of “world viewing” (Cavell), focusing on its phenomenological aspect? Has film in fact been purely organic and asymptomatic in its indexical status as many theoreticians seem to claim? Is the cinematic metamorphosis voluntary or forced? Is this transplantation merely an occurrence of cultural nostalgia? Will it diminish or increase the media biodiversity? What kind of new cinematic genres will evolve as the result of this transplantation? Does cinema live in a “digital dark age” (Usai) or will the digital divide signal the arrival of a “brave new world” for cinema?

These questions lead to the pressing demand for a new film history and theory (Elsaesser) that will substantially modify, if not supplant the methodological apparatus of classical film theory. This class will explore the foundations of this new film theory, scrutinizing writings by Manovich, Elsaesser, Jenkins, Krauss, Siegert, Rancière, Rodovick, Naficy, etc. Works by Michael Haneke, Chris Marker, Jean-Luc Godard, Elia Suleiman, Esteban Sapir, Ettore Scola, Mike Figgis, Ari Folman, Alexander Sokurov, Apichatpong Weerasethakul and others will be considered as media examples.

To sum up, the major agenda of this class will be to arrive at a dynamic definition of cinema in the thriving environment of digital diversity by analyzing the glo(c)al energy flows and processes that govern the current media ecosystem. Perhaps, together with Niels Niessen, we will come to the realization that “the declaration of cinema’s death arrives prematurely.”

Fulfills the Advanced Analysis, Media and Culture or Media Study Electives.

DMS 418 On the road: Media Geographies
Rueb :: M 1-4pm :: cfa252
Reg#21263

The recent convergence of film, video, and sound as delivered via mobile media is explored in this field-based production course that literally takes place on the road. Students and faculty travel together and work in small teams to create mobile media works that engage the interrelationship of media, movement, and geography as they learn about and experience the landscapes, histories, and cultures of Western New York.

The course begins with short exercises to introduce formal and technical skills and techniques spanning experimental, non-linear, documentary, narrative and non-narrative forms, especially as they relate to locative media, film/video and site-specificity. Students then break into 3-5 teams to follow separate itineraries as they create works that explore their experiences of place and people.

For Fall 2013 we will follow a trajectory that takes us to sites of significance in Western New York, with a special emphasis on sites that are key to Native American perspectives on landscape and the environment.

Enrollment is open to graduate and undergraduate students. Students will be responsible for their own travel expenses as they determine sites for their final projects. Group field trips, which include transportation, will run approximately $100 total per student.

Lab fee: $100

DMS 420 Advanced Digital Arts Production
Pape :: M/W 11am-12:50pm :: cfa242
Reg#23738
This cour
se will focus on thematic, conceptual and creative issues as students produce computer-based works for interactive media. It will be a place for students to initiate and follow through on substantive projects based both in creative concepts and technical research. It will be open to any and all types of computer-based or technology-driven work, projects designed exclusively for viewing with computer and monitor and projects that involve installation or physical computing elements. Students should come with considerable skills in this area, be motivated to try new things, and be prepared for critiques. $100 Lab Fee.Fulfills Advanced * Intermediate Requirement.

DMS 423 Programming Graphics1
Pape :: T/TH 9-10:50am :: cfa242
REG#13101

This production course will introduce students to the concepts and practice of programming 3D computer graphics and audio using OpenGL and other libraries. The major focus will be on creating interactive art or games experiences by programming both graphics and sound. The course has three goals: to demystify computer code – we get behind the Graphic User Interface to the machine below; to explore the potential of programming – writing our own code means we can create customized computer tools as well as customized visuals; and to teach the fundamentals of graphics programming. Prerequisites are experience in a programming language such as Python, C, C++, or Java (DMS 121, CSE 113/4/5 or equivalent). Permission of Instructor required. Lab fee $100. Contact: dave.pape@acm.org Fulfills Intermediate Production

DMS 448 Games, Gender and Society
Anstey :: M/W 11am-12:50pm :: cfa232
Reg#20953

The goal of this advanced theory course is to provide you with analytical tools and a background in readings to address the history, design, cultures, and theory of games and gaming. Taking games as a broad category describing a variety of design, production, and play practices, we will examine analog games, digital and computer games, as well as other, more experimental forms, through lenses varying from art history to economics to philosophy to computer science. This course will provide a strong foundation for students interested in the history of games, game design for artists, play as activism, and contemporary media cultures.
Students will engage in independent research and develop their own ideas around games and gaming. We will provide you with support – both theoretical and technical – to expand your research, writing, and rhetorical skills. The broad base of topics we will address will guarantee that you will find something that piques your interest.

DMS 455 Social Web Media
Clark :: M/W 3-4:50 :: CFA 244
Reg # 18445

What does social media look like after the recent world events? How will the advent of Google+ and emerging social media change the landscape of the social web? What comes after social media? How will you use it? What will you create? This class combines analysis of web media in terms of participation and community formation with practical skills needed to shape the future of social media. We will examine social networking sites, blogging, peer-to-peer networks, reputation economies, mobile communication technologies, activism, and surveillance while developing a critical framework for discussing the state of networked culture. We will also gain a practical understanding of New Media through the use and creation of our own social web tools.

DMS 461 Machines, Codes, Culture
Bohlen :: M W , 9:00 AM – 10:50 AM :: cfa 112
REG:24633

This course will follow the history of machines and coding systems from the monastery bell to the latest humanoid robot; from the origins of numeric notation to protocols of cloud computing in select episodes. This is not a history course, but an overview of concepts related to information technologies that substantially impact daily life. Consequently, the course will focus on cultural aspects of technologies and the myriad ways in which they are woven into the fabric of human activities, both in personal and public domains. Topics will include numbering systems, information and encoding, autonomous robots, interaction design, household smart appliances, the Internet of Things, social media and cloud computing. Students will introduced to these concepts through texts and guided through them in weekly discussions. Materials will be gathered from diverse authors such as: Lewis Mumford, Paul Virilio, Harun Farocki, Friedrich Kittler, Michel Foucault, Caroline Marvin, Hans Moravec, Marvin Minsky, Sherry Turkle, Bruno Latour, Reviel Netz and others. Grades will be based on a semester position paper, a multiple choice exam and participation in class discussions. We will watch videos. Open to all students!

DMS 496 (1- 4 CR VARIABLE) MEDIA ARTS INTERNSHIP
Staff
REG# Permission of Instructor

Media Study majors have the opportunity to gain variable academic credit for internships in local and national media production companies, television stations, cable companies, and media access centers. This is an unpaid internship available to majors. Guidelines are set by an internship supervisor in collaboration with a faculty sponsor to provide hands-on practical experience in an on-the-job training program. For registration information, see Dean Sanborn in 248 CFA. Media Study Elective.

DMS 499 (1-4 CR VARIABLE) INDEPENDENT STUDY
Staff
REG# Permission of Instructor

Students may arrange for special courses of study with faculty through “Independent Study.” The instructor will set the guidelines for the course on an individual basis. It permits the student to study, independently, in an area where no course is given. Syllabus for Independent Study should be prepared prior to semester, signed by the instructor, with one copy on file with the department. For registration information, see Luann Zak in 231 CFA. Lab fee for production work: $100 Media Study Elective.