Fall 2016

<DMS 103A Basic Video

staff :: MW 9:00 – 10:50AM :: CFA 286
REG# 16380

This course is a basic introduction to the tools and techniques of video production. Students will become familiar with using video and develop strategies for its application as an alternative medium of communication. Crucial to this project is the concurrent development of a critical perspective on mainstream media culture. Video art screenings and readings in media theory will critically address the relations between viewers, producers, and the media. Students must expect to acquire materials and texts costing approx. $50.00 to be used in exercises in classroom presentations. Access to equipment and editing facilities will be available. Lab fee: $125. Class size is strictly limited.

Fulfills Basic Production Requirement.

  • DMS 103B Basic Video

    staff :: T/R 9:00am-10:50pm :: CFA 286
    REG#16580

    This course is a basic introduction to the tools and techniques of video production. Students will become familiar with using video and develop strategies for its application as an alternative medium of communication. Crucial to this project is the concurrent development of a critical perspective on mainstream media culture. Video art screenings and readings in media theory will critically address the relations between viewers, producers, and the media. Students must expect to acquire materials and texts costing approx. $50.00 to be used in exercises in classroom presentations. Access to equipment and editing facilities will be available. Lab fee: $125. Class size is strictly limited.

    Fulfills Basic Production Requirement.

  • DMS 105B Basic Documentary

    Staff :: TR 11:00AM – 12:50PM :: CFA 286
    REG#16825

    This course will present students with the fundamental, theoretical, creative, and technical concerns of documentary and video production. Students will be introduced to methods of research, production design, approach to subject, interviewing and the structuring of information, as well as the technical video skills of camera work, sound recording, and lighting and editing, as they apply specifically to the documentary process. The demands of documentary expression require preparation with a different emphasis from that which applies to the personal and experimental approaches to film making and video making. Materials and texts will cost approx. $50. Lab fee: $125. Class size is strictly limited.

    Fulfills Basic Production Requirement.

  • DMS 107 Film & Media History I

    Roussel, Roy :: M 9am-12:40am :: CFA 112
    REG#16934

    This course understands media history to include the immediate past/present as well as the distant past.  The initial classes are concerned with giving students a definition of ‘medium’ comprehensive enough to include oral and manuscript cultures. The majority of the course focuses on the development of mass media from the advent of print through networked computing. I am particularly concerned with the way various mediums both have enabled environmental media and also provided the means of reflecting on this condition. This course is concerned with giving students key basic concepts to deal with life in what Marshall McLuhan called ‘the electronic village.’ Many short reading assignments along with films, documentaries and on-line material. Many, many short written and media responses.

    Fulfills Introduction Interpretation Requirement.

  • DMS 110 Basic Programming

    staff :: M/W 9:00am – 10:50am :: CFA 244
    REG#24857

    Beginner programming course geared towards Media Study majors with little to no experience who want to pursue Programming Graphics, Game Design and Virtual Reality. This course introduces basic concepts of Computer Science with the javascript programming language, while incorporating a Media Study perspective. Non Majors welcome if space available. Lab fee: $125.

    Fulfills Basic Production Requirement.

  • DMS 110 Programming For Digital Art

    staff :: T/TH 11am-12:50pm :: CFA 244
    REG#15972

    Beginner programming course geared towards Media Study majors with little to no experience who want to pursue Programming Graphics, Game Design and Virtual Reality. This course introduces basic concepts of Computer Science with the javascript programming language, while incorporating a Media Study perspective. Non Majors welcome if space available. Lab fee: $125.

    Fulfills Basic Production Requirement.

  • DMS 121 Basic Digital Arts

    staff :: T/TH 9:00am – 10:50am :: CFA 244
    REG#19187

    This course is an introduction to computer-based media production in the context of contemporary internet tools and techniques. The course covers image and sound editing & manipulation, web development, and interactive design. Crucial to this project is the concurrent development of a critical perspective on mainstream media culture. Viewing/Interacting with contemporary web-based art projects, interventionist art & Hacktivism, and readings in media theory will critically address the relations between viewers, producers, and media. Lab fee: $125.

    Fulfills Basic Production Requirement.

  • DMS 193 Intro To Journalism

    Galarneau :: W 7:00PM – 9:40PM :: TBA
    REG# 18867

    This course is a gateway into the Journalism Certificate program and teaches students to research, report and write news and feature stories for print, broadcast and the web. It also provides an overview of American journalism standards and an introduction to American media and press law.

    Students learn to conduct interviews, use quotes, and write in Associated Press style. They also learn the importance of accuracy, integrity and deadlines. Students analyze the merit and structure of good (and bad) news stories and focus on how journalists tell stories differently in print, radio, TV and on the web.

    Students will have in-class quizzes and take-home writing exercises, designed to help them master the fundamentals of news writing. Those include two stories that students will take from start to finish: shaping a story idea, identifying sources and interviewing them, then crafting the material into final written form. In addition to a textbook, students will read selected stories in class pertinent to class discussions.

    This course is a Pre-requisite to the Journalism Certificate Program.

  • DMS 198 UB Seminar: Media-Saturated World

    Pape :: T 9:00AM – 10:00AM :: Cfa 235
    REG# 23668

    This course introduces transfer students to the field of Media Study, focusing on the key forms that constitute media in modern culture. Students develop a critical perspective on mainstream media – considering media as representational forms as well as aesthetic, social, and/or political practices. Students will view/interact with a wide range of media works in the context of media theory that critically addresses the relations between viewers, producers, and consumers. Students will use the UB e-portfolio to assemble and organize their responses to this material.

    As well as theoretically understanding the scope and impact of media in a computer-based society, Media Study involves decoding media representations and being able to create and communicate ideas and information using established and emerging media. Therefore, in this seminar students are introduced to the choices available in the Department of Media Study, in terms of both analytical and production work. Students are also familiarized with the UB Curriculum program and the opportunities to integrate multiple disciplines.

    “For Transfer Students ONLY.”

  • DMS 199 UB Seminar: From Screen to Screens

    Elder :: T/TH 3:00PM – 4:20PM :: CFA 235
    REG# 23670

    UB Seminar for incoming freshman, focused on the big ideas and questions of significance in Media Study, to connect with issues of consequence in the wider world. Essential to the UB Curriculum, the Seminar helps students with common learning outcomes focused on fundamental expectations for critical thinking, ethical reasoning, and oral communication, and learning at a university, all within topic focused subject matter. The Seminars provide students with an early connection to UB faculty and the undergraduate experience at a comprehensive, research university. This course is equivalent to any 199 offered in any subject. Students who have previously attempted the course and received a grade of F or R may not be able to repeat the course during the fall or spring semester.”

    Lab fee: $125.

    “Fulfills Basic Production Requirement. For incoming freshmen ONLY.”

  • DMS 199 UB Seminar: From Screen to Screens

    Elder :: T/Th  11:00AM – 12:20PM :: CFA 235
    REG# 23669

    UB Seminar for incoming freshman, focused on the big ideas and questions of significance in Media Study, to connect with issues of consequence in the wider world. Essential to the UB Curriculum, the Seminar helps students with common learning outcomes focused on fundamental expectations for critical thinking, ethical reasoning, and oral communication, and learning at a university, all within topic focused subject matter. The Seminars provide students with an early connection to UB faculty and the undergraduate experience at a comprehensive, research university. This course is equivalent to any 199 offered in any subject. Students who have previously attempted the course and received a grade of F or R may not be able to repeat the course during the fall or spring semester.”

    Lab fee: $125.

    “Fulfills Basic Production Requirement. For incoming freshmen ONLY.”

  • DMS 199 UB Seminar: Making and Being Made by Media

    Glazier :: M 3:00PM – 5:20PM :: CFA 244
    REG# 23671

    UB Seminar for incoming freshman, focused on the big ideas and questions of significance in Media Study, to connect with issues of consequence in the wider world. Essential to the UB Curriculum, the Seminar helps students with common learning outcomes focused on fundamental expectations for critical thinking, ethical reasoning, and oral communication, and learning at a university, all within topic focused subject matter. The Seminars provide students with an early connection to UB faculty and the undergraduate experience at a comprehensive, research university. This course is equivalent to any 199 offered in any subject. Students who have previously attempted the course and received a grade of F or R may not be able to repeat the course during the fall or spring semester.”

    Lab fee: $125.

    “Fulfills Basic Production Requirement. For incoming freshmen ONLY.”

  • DMS 199 UB Seminar: Making and Being Made by Media

    Pape :: MW 1:00PM – 2:20PM :: CFA 242
    REG# 23672

    UB Seminar for incoming freshman, focused on the big ideas and questions of significance in Media Study, to connect with issues of consequence in the wider world. Essential to the UB Curriculum, the Seminar helps students with common learning outcomes focused on fundamental expectations for critical thinking, ethical reasoning, and oral communication, and learning at a university, all within topic focused subject matter. The Seminars provide students with an early connection to UB faculty and the undergraduate experience at a comprehensive, research university. This course is equivalent to any 199 offered in any subject. Students who have previously attempted the course and received a grade of F or R may not be able to repeat the course during the fall or spring semester.”

    Lab fee: $125.

    “Fulfills Basic Production Requirement. For incoming freshmen ONLY.”

  • DMS 200 Visual Speakers Series

    Brose :: M 6:30PM – 8:30PM :: CFA 112
    REG# 20085

    “Exposure to a diversity of mid-career and established professional artists and designers is one of the greatest tools for preparing art and design students to go out into the world. It provides a glimpse of long-term career paths beyond the formal education process, living examples of how others apply their talents in the world. Art and design students need to have role models beyond their teachers – artists and designers who are engaged in life affirming and sustaining work. This one-credit course is designed to supplement and complete the existing curriculum of BFA and BA Art Majors, and consolidates all of our current individual faculty efforts to bring visiting lecturers to campus into a more accessible program. A visual studies speakers series course provides a workable structure for this activity.”

  • DMS 212 Indian Image On Film

    McCarthy :: T 4:10 – 6:50pm :: TBA
    Reg#16148

    Explore Hollywood “Indians” through major motion pictures, B Westerns, documentaries, “indies,” and TV episodes (all viewed in class). See how Indigenous filmmakers use stereotypical representations mixed with humor to counter Hollywood’s legacy. Inves-tigate ways the camera tells a different story than the dialog. Examine the visual impact films have on our perceptions of “Indian” history and cultures. Consider how Hollywood’s reel reality stacks up against the Indigenous real reality.

    Fulfills Basic Theory and Intro to Interpretation or Media and Culture .

  • DMS 220 Machines, Codes and Cultures

    Bohlen :: M/W 3:00PM – 4:50PM :: CFA 112
    REG# 22661

    This course will follow the history of machines and coding systems from the monastery bell to the latest humanoid robot; from the origins of numeric notation to social media in select episodes. This is not a history course, but an overview of concepts related to information technologies that substantially impact daily life today. Consequently, the course will focus on cultural aspects of technologies and the myriad ways in which they are woven into the fabric of human activities. Topics will include the making of cities, numbering systems, agriculture, timekeeping and navigation, robots, interaction design, household appliances, software systems, social media and speculative design. Students will be introduced to these concepts through primary source materials (texts and videos) and guided through them in weekly discussions. Grades will be based on a mid-semester position paper, a multiple choice final exam as well as participation in class discussions and a voluntary extra credit assignment.  Open to all students!

    Fulfills Basic Theory and Intro to Interpretation or Media and Culture .

  • DMS 221 Web Development

    staff :: MW 1:00 – 2:50AM :: CFA 244
    REG# 23673

    This is a course exploring the general topic of web applications – that is, using programming to create dynamic, interactive websites, or programming with web APIs, or similar subjects. It is intended to follow an “inquiry based” approach. This means that much of the direction of the course is up to you, the student. Following a bit of fundamentals (HTML and Javascript), students will be expected to decide what specific topics you want to examine in detail, and to take initiative on learning and doing things. I, the instructor, will be along to guide and assist where needed, but I don’t wish to simply follow a set course of lectures. Once things get going, class sessions will depend heavily on what you bring to them.

    Lab fee: $125

  • DMS 231 Game and Animation Workshop

    staff :: T/TH 1-2:50pm :: CFA 242
    REG# 23674

    Increasingly we live, play, and work in virtual worlds created by computer graphics, 3D models, scripts and programs; places inhabited by networked people and autonomous computer characters. This production course focuses on 3D modeling and animation; virtual world building functions and scripting / programming in game engines.

    Lab fee is $125

    Fulfills Intermediate Production Requirement.

  • DMS 333 World Cinema

    Shilina-Conte :: TH 5:00PM – 8:40PM :: CFA 112
    REG# 22664

    “World cinema” can no longer be reduced to the category of individual national cinemas, eroded by the oppositional formula “the West and the Rest.” David Martin-Jones suggests approaching “world cinemas” in the plural mode “as an interconnected multiplicity (forest) rather than a collection of autonomous sovereign nation-states (trees).” To use the metaphor of the GPS navigation device, this class will engage in remapping and recalculating the alternative routes of world cinema. Creating this new cartography will require different models of reconceptualization.

    One such concept is “Minor Cinema,” proposed by Gilles Deleuze, which will serve as the cornerstone for this class. On the one hand, we will look at minor cinema as a vehicle of experimentation that goes against dominant practices and mainstream currents, pushing the limits of cinematic language to open new horizons. On the other hand, we will engage with minor cinema as political cinema, created by or for minority figures. Mikhail Bakhtin once stated that “in culture, exotopy is the most powerful tool for understanding.” The look from the outside invites “becoming-minor,” in order to entertain and celebrate difference, not sameness. Approached from both angles, minor cinema intersects with cinema of small or unrecognized nations, women’s cinema, queer cinema, indigenous cinema, black cinema, amateur cinema, remix culture, etc. In addition, we will explore a range of other competing terms at the intersection of global culture, transnationalism, information age and activist cinema. These will include “Third Cinema” (Solanas & Octavio), “Intercultural Cinema” (Marks), “Accented Cinema” (Naficy), “Peripheral Cinema” (Iordanova), “Nomadic Cinema” ( Andrew), as well as postcolonial, hybrid, marginal, militant, interstitial and diasporic cinema.

    The films chosen for this class will explore alternative means of representation, such as fragmentation, coding, silence and absence, both as a means of experimentation with the cinematic language and a tool of political protest and resistance. The films will range between “Divine Intervention” by Elia Suleiman (Palestine), “La Antena” by Esteban Sapir (Argentina), “The Missing Picture” by Rithy Panh (Cambodia), “Rebirth of a Nation” by DJ Spooky and “Citizenfour” by Laura Poitras (US). Critical texts and films will help us to understand our present existence in a world marked by the unprecedented flows of information, as well as the social, (geo)political and cultural forces that shape our ways of inhabiting it. Rachel Falconer describes a person who is critically attuned to these new challenges of globalized networked culture as a “DJ of Thought.” This class invites you to become a DJ of Thought.

    Fulfills Media & Culture OR Advanced Theory Requirement.

  • DMS 341 Intermediate Video Wkshp

    staff :: T/Th – 1:00PM – 2:50PM :: CFA286
    REG#23675

    Prereqs: DMS 103 or 105 or 199s

    This hybrid production/theory course will explore concepts taken from various sources, from ‘traditional film’ to sub-genres of ‘experimental film’, media and video art, among others. In class we will screen and discuss works, styles, and techniques that will enable students to analyze how technique has been applied with proficiency. Through a series of different short exercises, students will develop and improve technical knowledge, as their creativity will be challenged to connect ideas with skills. By exploring diverse usages of cameras, microphones, lights, grips and supports, new shooting techniques will be applied in particular production circumstances. The goal is to heighten the students’ aesthetic criteria in the application of technique for environments of media production. Accordingly the students will create a short final project as a conclusion of the semester. This is an intermediate level production course – students should have a basic understanding of camera, sound, and editing tools and be prepared to work both independently and in groups. Lab fee: $125

    Fulfills * Intermediate Production requirement.

  • DMS 388 Screenwriting

    staff :: T/TH 9:00 – 10:50AM :: CFA 232
    REG# 23676

    In this production workshop students will concentrate on writing and editing text/script elements for their media projects. The course will explore both traditional and experimental methods for generating and structuring text for fictional and documentary work. Texts may include original writing, interview material, collaged or found fragments, that will be performed, heard or displayed in the final piece. The texts may be linear, non-linear, interactive, poetic…

    Lab fee: $125.
    Fulfills Advanced Production.

  • DMS 411 Film and Media Theory

    Shilina-Conte :: MW 9:00 – 10:50AM :: CFA 286
    REG# 19824
    This course will guide you through the maze of “pre-” and “post-,” “-isms” and “-ships” in film studies.  We’ll examine theories of realism, formalism, semiotics, psychoanalysis, feminism, structuralism, post-structuralism and cognitive criticism with a particular emphasis on the sensory dimension of the moving image.  Assigned readings for the course will include selections from the writings of Bazin, Eisenstein, Baudry, Metz, Balasz, Gunning, Arnheim, Mulvey, Bordwell, Deleuze, Marks, Sobchack and Shaviro, among others. Following Thomas Elsaesser’s approach to film theory through the senses, and focusing on the role of the spectator in cinema, we will study classical and contemporary film paradigms through the interaction between Moving Image and Senses, Body and Mind, emphasizing such metaphors of filmic experience as Window and Frame, Door and Screen, Mirror and Face. Watching such films as Peeping Tom by Powell, Repulsion by Polanski, Persona by Bergman, Stalker by Tarkovsky, The Hand by Wong Kar Wai, we will not only interpret the way we “see” and “hear” films but also explore them through our senses of touch, smell and even taste. As Elsaesser points out, “film and spectator are like parasite and host, each occupying the other and being in turn occupied.” This unique approach to the confrontation and conflation of mind and body with the screen will open for us new models for knowing and representing the world through film and media.
    Fulfills Advanced Analysis OR Advanced Theory.

  • DMS 420 Advanced Digital Arts Production

    staff :: MW 11:00AM – 12:50PM :: CFA 244
    REG# 23678

    The conceptual and practical production of a multimedia digital art project, that uses tools like moving image, still image, text and sound to be then hosted online using HTML, CSS and Javascript (Open to processing as well, based on student capability) . Students should have basic knowledge of Photoshop, any video and sound editing software, HTML and CSS

    Lab fee $125

    Fulfills Advanced Production.

  • DMS 422 Buffalo Film Seminars/ Film Directors

    Jackson :: T 7:00PM – 9:40PM :: Off Campus
    REG# 23008

    The Buffalo Film Seminars take place Tuesday nights at 7 p.m. promptly, at the Dipson Amherst Theatre, 3500 Main St., Buffalo, NY 14226.

    Each week Diane Christian and Bruce Jackson introduce the film, the film is screened, we take a brief break, and then have an open discussion with students in a University at Buffalo film class and anyone else who cares to join us.

    Tickets for the seminars are adults $9, students $7, seniors $6.50. Season tickets are available any time at a 15% reduction for the cost of the remaining films. Free parking.

    Handouts with production details, anecdotes and critical comments about each week’s film on goldenrod paper are available in the lobby 45 minutes before each session. The Goldenrod handouts are posted online one day before the screening. (All previous handouts are also online.)

    The Buffalo Film Seminars are presented by the University at Buffalo.

    Fulfill Advanced Analysis OR Advanced Theory.

  • DMS 422 The Korean Wave

    staff :: T R , 3:30 PM – 4:50 PM :: Clemen117
    Reg#25143

    This course will explore the Korean Wave, a term that is used to describe the new international popularity of South Korean popular culture since late 1990s. From a brief study of the origin and history of the Korean Wave, we will move to analyze the specific features of popular culture industries in South Korea?from the big screen through broadcasting and the music industry to video games. This class is designed to be not only a guide map for those who would like to have in-depth understanding about the Korean Wave but also a road map for those who plan to work in South Korean Entertainment industry. No prior knowledge of South Korean popular culture is required. South Korean films and TV shows will be provided with English subtitles.

  • DMS 425 Visual Media Poetics

    Glazier :: T 1:00PM – 4:40PM :: CFA 232
    REG# 23687

    Visual Media Poetics provides the opportunity to explore the expressive potential of language as a creative material existing on alphabetic, visual, and aural levels, with a focus on visual forms of cultural expression. Visual anthropology will provide a significant lens through which to view visual media and its impact on the cultural milieu. We will take multiple approaches to visual expression, including cultural studies, visual theories, the photographic image, the virtual, representations of the cultural/historic “other”, and sexual/embodied practices, among others The immense value of 20th century experimental literature and innovative film to he student’s own efforts to design or interpret media writing is an additional concern of this course. We will be thinking about the varied possibilities of language as a conjunction of textures, tones, meanings, and media. We will look at media “literature” as a merging of form, image, language, and sound, and we will explore works that successfully produce this extraordinary effect. We will look at works of Concrete, digital, and text poetry and consider these as models for digital media design. We will study theoretical essays and manifestos related to visual media practice, investigating modes and means of visual media expression as seen through a number of documentary and narrative films, including popular and arts films focused on visual imaginations (ranging from Almodovar, Buñuel, and Fellini to new cinema works, with an emphasis on culturally diverse perspectives). Course requirements: Weekly readings (to be announced), an oral presentation, a final project, exams, quizzes, and brief written assignments as necessary. Attendance is crucial.

    Text-TBA

    Fulfills Advanced Theory and Advanced Analysis.

  • DMS 441 Advanced Video

    staff :: M/W 11-12:50 :: CFA286
    Reg#23651.

    This course addresses the hands-on practice of video production while closely observing the aesthetics of the various stages of video and audio workflow, with a critical examination of form and content.

    The learning objective of this course is for the students to develop the ability to capture video images in various locations under controlled and uncontrolled lighting conditions, record audio, and edit those elements together to tell a compelling story.

    Through intensive practical projects and exercises, the course offers insight into the essential requirements of film and video storytelling and provides hands-on instruction on the technical processes required to successfully produce short films and videos. Filmmaking is a collaborative process and students are encouraged to explore different crew roles (directing, cinematography, sound recording, editing and post sound) over the projects and exercises that will be assigned in the course, in addition to in-class workshops, discussions and screenings. Lab fee is $125.

    Fulfills Advanced Production.

  • DMS 447 Sound Design

    Bouquard  :: TH 1pm – 4:40pm  :: CFA232
    REG#23677

    The object of sound design is to explore issues and techniques in the area of sound design and digital audio production. The “visual” media –film and video- are powerfully inflected by their accompanying audio tracks, which frequently convey the work’s preponderant sensibility, or even its core meaning. This course will prepare students technically, conceptually and musically to work with audi

    Lab fee is $125

    Fulfills Advanced Production Requirement.

  • DMS 462 Game Design

    Pape,David E :: M/W 9:00AM – 10:50AM :: CFA 242
    Reg#22675

    Pre Req’s – junior or senior status

    Production course on the design of games, both computer-based and analog. We will examine both practical and theoretical aspects of designing a game. Important aspects are how to create something that will be both meaningful and fun to play, and how the rules and other elements of the game affect that. Two things are central to this class: understanding the fundamental formal structures of games, and learning the overall process of designing and developing new games. The course encourages experimental thinking about the boundaries and possibilities of games. Students work in teams to produce a complete game.  Thorough, hands-on grounding in the process of game design, including brainstorming, paper prototyping, play-testing, and iterative design. Fosters the skills required to produce, examine, and critique games. Lab fee is $125.

    Fulfills Advanced Production.

  • DMS 480 Social Media Networks

    staff :: online course
    REG# 22672

    Our life is penetrated by different digital networks and social media systems. We communicate via Facebook or Twitter. Our social life is being organized by these networks. They notify us about events, birthdays and even things we might want to buy. These systems have become so ubiquitous that we hardly notice their existence, except when they fail. Failures, breaks, disconnections make these connections visible in new ways.
    This seminar will investigate different connections and disconnections in media. For example we will map the discourses around Web 2.0 and user participation and examine the ideological and economic principles of social media systems. We will look at things that challenge these user models such as dead Facebook users or online trolls. The course is focused on digital media specific material but not limited to it. In addition to reading assignments the students will do tasks and assignments where they analytically approach the themes of the lecture each week.

    Fulfill Advanced Analysis OR Advanced Theory.

  • DMS 496 (1- 4 CR VARIABLE) MEDIA ARTS INTERNSHIP

    Staff
    REG# Permission of Instructor

    Media Study majors have the opportunity to gain variable academic credit for internships in local and national media production companies, television stations, cable companies, and media access centers. This is an unpaid internship available to majors. Guidelines are set by an internship supervisor in collaboration with a faculty sponsor to provide hands-on practical experience in an on-the-job training program. For registration information, see Elaine Schwartz in 231 CFA.

    Media Study Elective.

  • DMS 499 (1-4 CR VARIABLE) INDEPENDENT STUDY

    Staff
    REG# Permission of Instructor
    Students may arrange for special courses of study with faculty through “Independent Study.” The instructor will set the guidelines for the course on an individual basis. It permits the student to study, independently, in an area where no course is given. Syllabus for Independent Study should be prepared prior to semester, signed by the instructor, with one copy on file with the department. For registration information, see Ann Mangan in 231 CFA. Lab fee for production work: $125

    Media Study Elective.