Fall 2014

Fall 2014

  • DMS 101 BASIC FILM MAKING
    Staff :: T R , 3:00 – 4:50 PM :: CFA286
    REG#24338
    This course is intended to provide a basic introduction to 16mm film production. Classes will include screenings, lectures, and demonstrations. Students will learn basic camera operation, lighting, editing, and sound acquisition. In addition, the course will explore the critical relationship between theory and practice in the context of film production. Students will be required to complete collaborative class projects, individual assignments, and a critical paper. Each student will also be required to complete a short, non-sync, 16mm film project. Class materials will cost approx. $150. Lab fee: $100. Class size is strictly limited.
    Fulfills Basic Production Requirement.
  • DMS 103A BASIC VIDEO
    Staff :: MW 9:00 – 10:50AM :: CFA 286
    REG#17915
    This course is a basic introduction to the tools and techniques of video production. Students will become familiar with using video and develop strategies for its application as an alternative medium of communication. Crucial to this project is the concurrent development of a critical perspective on mainstream media culture. Video art screenings and readings in media theory will critically address the relations between viewers, producers, and the media. Students must expect to acquire materials and texts costing approx. $50.00 to be used in exercises in classroom presentations. Access to equipment and editing facilities will be available. Lab fee: $100. Class size is strictly limited.
    Fulfills Basic Production Requirement.
  • DMS 103B BASIC VIDEO
    Staff :: T/R 9:00am-10:50pm :: CFA 286
    REG#17915
    This course is a basic introduction to the tools and techniques of video production. Students will become familiar with using video and develop strategies for its application as an alternative medium of communication. Crucial to this project is the concurrent development of a critical perspective on mainstream media culture. Video art screenings and readings in media theory will critically address the relations between viewers, producers, and the media. Students must expect to acquire materials and texts costing approx. $50.00 to be used in exercises in classroom presentations. Access to equipment and editing facilities will be available. Lab fee: $100. Class size is strictly limited.
    Fulfills Basic Production Requirement.
  • DMS 105A BASIC DOCUMENTARY
    Staff :: M/W 1:00-2:50pm :: CFA 286
    REG#19263
    This course will present students with the fundamental, theoretical, creative, and technical concerns of documentary and video production. Students will be introduced to methods of research, production design, approach to subject, interviewing and the structuring of information, as well as the technical video skills of camera work, sound recording, and lighting and editing, as they apply specifically to the documentary process. The demands of documentary expression require preparation with a different emphasis from that which applies to the personal and experimental approaches to filmmaking and video making. Materials and texts will cost approx. $50. Lab fee: $100. Class size is strictly limited.
    Fulfills Basic Production Requirement.
  • DMS 105B BASIC DOCUMENTARY
    Staff :: TR 11:00AM – 12:50PM :: CFA 286
    REG#18198
    This course will present students with the fundamental, theoretical, creative, and technical concerns of documentary and video production. Students will be introduced to methods of research, production design, approach to subject, interviewing and the structuring of information, as well as the technical video skills of camera work, sound recording, and lighting and editing, as they apply specifically to the documentary process. The demands of documentary expression require preparation with a different emphasis from that which applies to the personal and experimental approaches to filmmaking and video making. Materials and texts will cost approx. $50. Lab fee: $100. Class size is strictly limited.
    Fulfills Basic Production Requirement.
  • DMS 107 FILM & MEDIA HISTORY I
    Staff :: T/TH 11-12:50 :: CFA 112
    REG#18318
    Film History will expose students to screenings and scholarship chronicling the political and technological conditions of film production from the 1890’s to the present. We will broadly examine early motion pictures, pre-code Hollywood, German Expressionism, French Impressionism and Surrealism, Soviet Montage, Neorealist, the French New Wave, Post-Colonial African filmmaking, 1970’s Hollywood, digital filmmaking, and large format documentary. Attendance, readings, weekly response journal, and research paper are required.
  • DMS 110 PROGRAMMING FOR DIGITAL ART
    Pape :: M/W 11am-12:50pm :: CFA 244
    REG#17239
    Beginner programming course geared towards Media Study majors with little to no experience who want to pursue Programming Graphics, Game Design and Virtual Reality. This course introduces basic concepts of Computer Science with the Python programming language, while incorporating a Media Study perspective. Non Majors welcome if space available. Lab fee: $100.
    Fulfills Basic Production Requirement.
  • DMS 121 BASIC DIGITAL ARTS
    Staff :: MW 9:00AM – 10:50AM :: CFA 244
    REG#17699
    This course is an introduction to computer-based media production in the context of contemporary internet tools and techniques. The course covers image and sound editing & manipulation, web development, and interactive design. Crucial to this project is the concurrent development of a critical perspective on mainstream media culture. Viewing/Interacting with contemporary web-based art projects, interventionist art & Hacktivism, and readings in media theory will critically address the relations between viewers, producers, and media. Lab fee: $100.
    Fulfills Basic Production Requirement.
  • DMS 121 BASIC DIGITAL ARTS
    Staff :: T/TH 9:00AM – 10:50AM :: CFA 244
    REG#20822
    This course is an introduction to computer-based media production in the context of contemporary internet tools and techniques. The course covers image and sound editing & manipulation, web development, and interactive design. Crucial to this project is the concurrent development of a critical perspective on mainstream media culture. Viewing/Interacting with contemporary web-based art projects, interventionist art & Hacktivism, and readings in media theory will critically address the relations between viewers, producers, and media. Lab fee: $100.
    Fulfills Basic Production Requirement.
  • DMS 200 VISUAL STUDIES SPEAKERS
    Staff :: M 6:30PM – 8:30PM :: CFA112
    Reg#22123
  • DMS 212 INDIAN IMAGE ON FILM
    McCarthy :: T 4:10 – 6:50pm :: O’Brian 112
    Reg#17437
    Explore Hollywood “Indians” through major motion pictures, B Westerns, documentaries, “indies,” and TV episodes (all viewed in class). See how Indigenous filmmakers use stereotypical representations mixed with humor to counter Hollywood’s legacy. Inves-tigate ways the camera tells a different story than the dialog. Examine the visual impact films have on our perceptions of “Indian” history and cultures. Consider how Hollywood’s reel reality stacks up against the Indigenous real reality.
  • DMS 213 IMMIGRATION & FILM
    Staff :: MW 1:00PM – 2:50PM :: CFA 112
    REG#21748
    By looking at representative examples of American and foreign films, this course will critically examine the role of cinema in the construction and exploration of the figure of the racial, ethnic, cultural and social theory. Our topics will include (1) racial, ethnic and cultural identity and its reciprocal relationship with cinema, (2) the notion of realism in relation to the representation of race and ethnicity in film, (3) the cinematic representation of inter-ethnic and intra-ethnic conflict, (4) the position of cinema in the debate between assimilation and multiculturalism. Films will be screened in class and discussed against the background of focused critical readings. The aim of the course is to provide you with an opportunity to develop your critical thinking and writing abilities through class discussions, close readings of films and critical literature, and writing assignments. The course fulfills the American Pluralism requirement.
    Fulfills the American Pluralism requirement or Media and Culture or Media Study Elective.
  • DMS 213 IMMIGRATION & FILM
    Staff :: TR 9:00AM – 10:50PM :: CFA 232
    reg#19557
    By looking at representative examples of American and foreign films, this course will critically examine the role of cinema in the construction and exploration of the figure of the racial, ethnic, cultural and social theory. Our topics will include (1) racial, ethnic and cultural identity and its reciprocal relationship with cinema, (2) the notion of realism in relation to the representation of race and ethnicity in film, (3) the cinematic representation of inter-ethnic and intra-ethnic conflict, (4) the position of cinema in the debate between assimilation and multiculturalism. Films will be screened in class and discussed against the background of focused critical readings. The aim of the course is to provide you with an opportunity to develop your critical thinking and writing abilities through class discussions, close readings of films and critical literature, and writing assignments.
    Fulfills the American Pluralism requirement or Media and Culture or Media Study Elective.
  • DMS 218 MACHINES, CODES, AND CULTURES
    Bohlen :: M/W, 9:00AM – 10:50AM :: CFA235
    REG#23810
    This course will follow the history of machines and coding systems from the monastery bell to the latest humanoid robot; from the origins of numeric notation to protocols of cloud computing in select episodes. This is not a history course, but an overview of concepts related to information technologies that substantially impact daily life. Consequently, the course will focus on cultural aspects of technologies and the myriad ways in which they are woven into the fabric of human activities, both in personal and public domains. Topics will include numbering systems, information and encoding, autonomous robots, interaction design, household smart appliances, the Internet of Things, social media and cloud computing. Students will introduced to these concepts through texts and guided through them in weekly discussions. Materials will be gathered from diverse authors such as: Lewis Mumford, Paul Virilio, Harun Farocki, Friedrich Kittler, Michel Foucault, Caroline Marvin, Hans Moravec, Marvin Minsky, Sherry Turkle, Bruno Latour, Reviel Netz and others. Grades will be based on a semester position paper, a multiple choice exam and participation in class discussions. We will watch videos. Open to all students!This course will fulfill intro to interpretation analysis.
  • DMS 259 INTRO TO MEDIA ANALYSIS
    Sarlin :: M/W 3:00PM – 4:50PM :: CFA 112
    REG#21898
    An introduction to the key forms that constitute media in modern culture: photography, film, recorded sound, print, television, video, and digital media. This course will expose students to a range of critical accounts of different media – considering media as representational forms as well as aesthetic, social, and/or political practices. We will examine both the material components that define various media and the historical and social functions that they serve. Lectures, screenings, and discussions will be structured by major theoretical concepts and approaches drawn from the disciplines of film and media studies, critical theory, and cultural studies. This course will provide a solid theoretical foundation for all forms of media study – including both production and analysis.
    This course fulfill introduction to interpretation.
  • DMS 315 INTERMEDIATE DIGITAL WORKSHOP: PHYSICAL COMPUTING
    Staff :: M/W , 11am – 12:50pm :: CFA246
    REG#23934
    This course introduces basic concepts and techniques for creating objects, spaces and media that sense and respond to their physical surroundings and the actions and events that transpire there. Moving beyond the interface paradigm of screen, keyboard and mouse, physical computing enables alternate models for interaction with (and through) computers that afford more subtle and complex relations between a range of human and non-human actors.
    Fulfills * Intermediate Production requirement.
  • DMS 316 INTERMEDIATE DIGITAL WORKSHOP: GAME TECH
    Staff :: T/Th , 11am – 12:50pm :: CFA242
    REG#23935
    Increasingly we live, play, and work in virtual worlds created by computer graphics, 3D models, scripts and programs; places inhabited by networked people and autonomous computer characters. This production course focuses on 3D modelling; virtual world building functions and scripting/programming in game engines.
    Fulfills * Intermediate Production requirement.
  • DMS 342 INTERMEDIATE VIDEO WKSHP
    Staff:: T/Th – 1:00PM – 2:50PM :: CFA286
    REG#23911
    Prereqs: DMS 103 or 105
    Experimental Cinema is a broad and hard to define topic, but most agree that at its core it is a practice fueled by creative exploration that resists trends of traditional Hollywood filmmaking. This hybrid production/theory course will explore the history, practice, and sub-genres of experimental film and video making while engaging in various artistic and technical exercises designed to heighten our creative and mechanical understanding of movie-making. The class will cover many ideas associated with experimental cinema, but focus primarily on 4 specific genres: hand manipulated film, found footage, experimental documentary, and experimental narrative. In class we will be screening and discussing works, styles, and techniques, and engaging in creative exercises, while outside of class students will be creating a short final project that will be screened at the conclusion of the semester. This is an intermediate level production course- students should have a basic understanding of camera, sound, and editing tools and be prepared to work both independently and in groups.
    Lab fee: $100
    Fulfills * Intermediate Production requirement.
  • DMS 343 DIGITAL POST PRODUCTION
    Staff :: M/W, 11am – 12:50pm :: CFA244
    REG#23912
    Fulfills * Intermediate Production requirement.
  • DMS 404 ADVANCED DOCUMENTARY PROD: INTERVIEW WORK
    Sarlin :: M/W 11am – 12:50pm :: CFA 286
    REG#23508
    Lab fee: $100
    Fulfills Advanced Production.
  • DMS 411 FILM AND MEDIA THEORY
    Shilina-Conte :: T 5 – 8:50pm :: CFA112
    REG#21747This course will guide you through the maze of “pre-” and “post-,” “-isms” and “-ships” in film studies.  We’ll examine theories of realism, formalism, semiotics, psychoanalysis, feminism, structuralism, post-structuralism and cognitive criticism with a particular emphasis on the sensory dimension of the moving image.  Assigned readings for the course will include selections from the writings of Bazin, Eisenstein, Baudry, Metz, Balasz, Gunning, Arnheim, Mulvey, Bordwell, Deleuze, Marks, Sobchack and Shaviro, among others. Following Thomas Elsaesser’s approach to film theory through the senses, and focusing on the role of the spectator in cinema, we will study classical and contemporary film paradigms through the interaction between Moving Image and Senses, Body and Mind, emphasizing such metaphors of filmic experience as Window and Frame, Door and Screen, Mirror and Face. Watching such films as Peeping Tom by Powell, Repulsion by Polanski, Persona by Bergman, Stalker by Tarkovsky, The Hand by Wong Kar Wai, we will not only interpret the way we “see” and “hear” films but also explore them through our senses of touch, smell and even taste. As Elsaesser points out, “film and spectator are like parasite and host, each occupying the other and being in turn occupied.” This unique approach to the confrontation and conflation of mind and body with the screen will open for us new models for knowing and representing the world through film and media.
    This course will fulfill advanced analysis.
  • DMS 415 COMPUTATIONAL MEDIA
    Bohlen :: W 1 – 4:40pm :: CFA246
    REG#22425
    This two semester graduate seminar will introduce students to important aspects of the art and science of numerical computing. The goal of the seminar is twofold: One, to understand important principles of numerical representation and two, to explore the procedures and boundaries of numerical representation as a form of creative inquiry.
    We will base our investigations on meteorological data sources and events. We will discuss climate, weather physics, sensor systems, transduction principles, data generation and software, data visualization, time series analysis, basic statistics, clustering techniques, correlation tests and other important data analysis methods. A prosumer weather station and open-source weather software will available for experimentation. We will ‘read’ and discuss environment ‘reporting’ of various kinds in numerically inclined new media as well as established media, including literature and film, in order to position the imaginary and disruptive potential of numerical data representations and manipulations.
    This course will be designed and paced for graduate students without prior exposure to numerical methods and computing. Insights will be applicable to all kinds of data practices, including biological and social media with arge data sets. Beginners will be asked to sign up for the full two semester course sequence. Students taking this two semester version may opt for a creative semester project to combine studio/production with analytical skill training.
    Open to graduate students and advanced undergrads by consent of instructor.
    This course will fulfill advanced analysis or advanced production.
  • DMS 415 FILM, CULTURE & MEDIA THEORY
    Glazier :: T 1pm – 4:40pm :: CFA232
    REG#24338
    This course develops filmic thinking, reading, and written expression. First, it includes screenings of extraordinary film arts works, many presenting international sensibilities, intriguing geographies, and inventive technical styles, films such as those by Almodovar, Kieslowski, Medem, Subiela, Guzman, Herzog, and Aronofsky, masterpieces that weave narrative in startling patterns, that have us peer through alternative lenses to check the pulse of what it means to think artistically beyond habitual mass media conventions of consumption. It’s about viewing, sensing, touching, opening your fields of perception as an artist, critic, and living being. Secondly, we will close-read short crucial written works about seeing, thinking, and reflecting — Barthes, Benjamin, Deleuze, etc. — theory essential to our contemplations of film, culture, consciousness, new digital horizons. Third, you will write short, reflective responses to films and the texts as course requirements. These responses encourage direct communication of your own ideas to develop your skills in articulating what you see and what it means to you. Attendance and screenings are essential. Required: Class participation, reading, oral presentation, film journal.
    For Media Study majors, this course fulfills advanced analysis, Media and Culture, or Media Study elective.
  • DMS 416 GLOBAL MEDIA AND CULTURE: THEORIES OF MONTAGE AND REPRESENTATION
    Shilina-Conte :: Th 4pm-7:40pm :: CFA112
    REG#22114
    This class will be structured as a comprehensive overview of the theory and practice of montage and representation in global media. Topics for discussion will include staging-in-depth (Bordwell), the Soviet montage school (Eisenstein, Kuleshov, Pudovkin, Vertov), American continuity style, rational and irrational/serial montage (Deleuze), spatiotemporal montage and montage-within-the-shot (Manovich), cinemetrics (Tsivian), QuickTime movies and “memory boxes” (Sobchack), etc. We will trace technological developments in film and digital media that permitted a shift from single frame shots (sequence) to multiple frames, windows and screens (multiplicity). Our special agenda in this class will be to focus on monochrome frames as points of rupture, where they are seen as simultaneously alien and integral to the field of the image. In these cases the cut often functions as both a “scar,” the visible evidence of a filmic cutting/psychic wounding, and a “threshold,” the invisible passage between suppressed history and troubling memory. From these reservoirs of invisible evidence in cinema swarm forth a host of critical issues such as ethnicity, race, sexuality, gender, ethics, trauma and censorship. The topics discussed in this class will help us to understand the connection between cinematic form and content and place mediated representations into social, cultural and historical contexts. Films and excerpts by Sergey Eisenstein, Dziga Vertov, Abel Gance, Jean-Luc Godard, Alain Resnais, Peter Greenaway, Chris Marker, Jim Jarmusch, Derek Jarman, Mania Akbari, Su Friedrich, Marlon Riggs, Alexander Sokurov and Carolee Schneeman will be considered. This class would be indispensable both for students interested in learning how to interpret film and media critically, as well as students who wish to become better editors/makers of their own films/media. Fulfills the Advanced Analysis, Media and Culture or Media Study Electives.
    Fulfills the Advanced Analysis, Media and Culture or Media Study Electives.
  • DMS 417 CONTEMPORARY CINEMA
    Rousssel :: Tuesday 1-4:40 :: CFA 112
    reg# 24361
  • DMS 417 ON THE ROAD: MEDIA GEOGRAPHIES
    Teri Rueb :: T 1 – 4:40pm :: TBA
    reg: 23939
    The recent convergence of film, video, and sound as delivered via mobile media is explored in this field-based production course that literally takes place on the road.  Students and faculty travel together and work in small teams to create mobile media works that engage the interrelationship of media, movement, and geography as they learn about and experience the landscapes, histories, and cultures of Western New York.The course begins with short exercises to introduce formal and technical skills and techniques spanning experimental, non-linear, documentary, narrative and non-narrative forms, especially as they relate to locative media and site-specificity.  Students then work individually or in collaboration to develop site-based works and itineraries that critically research and explore issues of place, culture and identity.  For Fall 2014 we will follow a trajectory that takes us to sites of in Western New York, with a special emphasis on “urban wilds” or disturbed landscapes and locations that have been reclaimed by spontaneous and opportunistic processes, both human and non-human.

    Enrollment is open to graduate and undergraduate students.  Students will be responsible for their own travel expenses as they determine sites for their final projects.  Students should be prepared for field-based work in a variety of weather conditions.

    Lab fee: $100

  • DMS 418 DIS/CONNECTIONS IN MEDIA CULTURE
    Karppi :: M/W 1 – 2:50pm :: CFA235
    REG#22048
    Our life is penetrated by different digital networks and social media systems. We communicate via Facebook or Twitter. Our social life is being organized by these networks. They notify us about events, birthdays and even things we might want to buy. These systems have become so ubiquitous that we hardly notice their existence, except when they fail. Failures, breaks, disconnections make these connections visible in new ways.
    This seminar will investigate different connections and disconnections in media. For example we will map the discourses around Web 2.0 and user participation and examine the ideological and economic principles of social media systems. We will look at things that challenge these user models such as dead Facebook users or online trolls. The course is focused on digital media specific material but not limited to it. In addition to reading assignments the students will do tasks and assignments where they analytically approach the themes of the lecture each week.
    Students taking this course at 400-level will have an exam at the end of the course and students taking this course at 500-level will do a written essay.
  • DMS 423 PROGRAMMING GRAPHICS 1
    Pape :: M/W 9 – 10:50am :: CFA242
    Lab-REG#18390
    Lec-REG#21364
    This production course will introduce students to the concepts and practice of programming 3D computer graphics and audio using OpenGL and other libraries. The major focus will be on creating interactive art or games experiences by programming both graphics and sound. The course has three goals: to demystify computer code – we get behind the Graphic User Interface to the machine below; to explore the potential of programming – writing our own code means we can create customized computer tools as well as customized visuals; and to teach the fundamentals of graphics programming. Prerequisites are experience in a programming language such as Python, C, C++, or Java (DMS 121, CSE 113/4/5 or equivalent). Lab fee $100. Contact: dave.pape@acm.org
  • DMS 434 MOBILE APPS WITH HTML5
    Markert :: Th 1 – 4:40pm :: cfa246
    Reg#24274
    Lab Fee – $100
    Did you ever wish to design an app for your iPhone? Or do you have an idea for the next awesome creative coding experience on the iPad? Do you have a new Android Tablet and want to make something cool with it? This is your chance!
    We will work with the latest cross-platform HTML5 web technologies (mainly the ECMA scripting language, better known as JavaScript; including CSS3) to create applications that will run on your mobile device.
    Participants should already know HTML and CSS; knowing at least one programming language (e.g. Processing) will be most helpful.
    MobileMarkertFall2014
    Michael Markert is visiting from the Bauhaus University Weimar. Last year he taught a weekend long Mobile Media Workshop at UB and now he is back teaching a semester long Mobile Media seminar. Markert is a media-artist specializing in programming and electronics. He is a member of the Urban Research Institute for Public Art and Urban Ethology. He researches into intuitive musical interfaces and develops, “various interactive sensory devices which he has used for installations and as musical instruments. The focus of his work is exploring cybernetic interaction systems through intuitive and interactive realtime sensory processing thereby overruling hierarchic receptional mechanisms in art.”
  • DMS 448 GAMES, GENDER AND SOCIETY
    Staff :: M/W 11:00AM – 12:50PM :: CFA232
    REG#23937
  • DMS 484 LANGUAGE MEDIA SOCIAL VISION
    Glazier :: M/W 3:00PM – 4:50PM :: CFA232
    REG#23936
    This course examines language, media, and social imagination through great minds of the BEAT GENERATION & AFTER including Allen Ginsberg, Jack Kerouac, William Burroughs, and Charles Bukowski. We will read essential works (e.g., Howl, On the Road, Naked Lunch, and Factotum) and screen films related to this culture-warping generation of outrageous American rebels with special attention to comparing their writings with VARIOUS FILM VERSIONS of their works, from quasi-commercial productions such as On the Road and Barfly to dark ruminations like Cronenberg’s Naked Lunch and the ultra-existential Saharan Sheltering Sky. We will hear the rhythm in the writing, read the word, demystify the play of image on the screen. We will consider how a literary generation can, through media, voice, written word, and image, open new doors to imagination and innovation, and allow us to approach the digital. Attendance and screenings are essential. Required: Class participation, readings, oral presentation, film journal.
    For Media Study majors, this course fulfills advanced analysis or Media Study elective.
  • DMS 496 (1- 4 CR VARIABLE) MEDIA ARTS INTERNSHIP
    Staff
    REG# Permission of Instructor
    Media Study majors have the opportunity to gain variable academic credit for internships in local and national media production companies, television stations, cable companies, and media access centers. This is an unpaid internship available to majors. Guidelines are set by an internship supervisor in collaboration with a faculty sponsor to provide hands-on practical experience in an on-the-job training program. For registration information, see Dean Sanborn in 248 CFA.
    Media Study Elective.
  • DMS 499 (1-4 CR VARIABLE) INDEPENDENT STUDY
    Staff
    REG# Permission of Instructor
    Students may arrange for special courses of study with faculty through “Independent Study.” The instructor will set the guidelines for the course on an individual basis. It permits the student to study, independently, in an area where no course is given. Syllabus for Independent Study should be prepared prior to semester, signed by the instructor, with one copy on file with the department. For registration information, see Luann Zak in 231 CFA. Lab fee for production work: $100
    Media Study Elective.