Fall 2013
  • DMS 101 BASIC FILM MAKING

    Staff :: T R , 1:00 – 2:50 PM :: CFA286
    REG# 22224

    This course is intended to provide a basic introduction to 16mm film production. Classes will include screenings, lectures, and demonstrations. Students will learn basic camera operation, lighting, editing, and sound acquisition. In addition, the course will explore the critical relationship between theory and practice in the context of film production. Students will be required to complete collaborative class projects, individual assignments, and a critical paper. Each student will also be required to complete a short, non-sync, 16mm film project. Class materials will cost approx. $150. Lab fee: $100. Class size is strictly limited.

    Fulfills Basic Production Requirement.

  • DMS 103A BASIC VIDEO

    Staff :: MW 9:00 – 10:50AM :: CFA 286
    REG#18275

    This course is a basic introduction to the tools and techniques of video production. Students will become familiar with using video and develop strategies for its application as an alternative medium of communication. Crucial to this project is the concurrent development of a critical perspective on mainstream media culture. Video art screenings and readings in media theory will critically address the relations between viewers, producers, and the media. Students must expect to acquire materials and texts costing approx. $50.00 to be used in exercises in classroom presentations. Access to equipment and editing facilities will be available. Lab fee: $100. Class size is strictly limited.

    Fulfills Basic Production Requirement.

  • DMS 103B BASIC VIDEO

    Staff :: T/R 9:00am-10:50pm :: CFA 286
    REG#18160

    This course is a basic introduction to the tools and techniques of video production. Students will become familiar with using video and develop strategies for its application as an alternative medium of communication. Crucial to this project is the concurrent development of a critical perspective on mainstream media culture. Video art screenings and readings in media theory will critically address the relations between viewers, producers, and the media. Students must expect to acquire materials and texts costing approx. $50.00 to be used in exercises in classroom presentations. Access to equipment and editing facilities will be available. Lab fee: $100. Class size is strictly limited.

    Fulfills Basic Production Requirement.

  • DMS 105A BASIC DOCUMENTARY

    Staff :: M/W 11:00am-12:50pm :: CFA 286
    REG#18371

    This course will present students with the fundamental, theoretical, creative, and technical concerns of documentary and video production. Students will be introduced to methods of research, production design, approach to subject, interviewing and the structuring of information, as well as the technical video skills of camera work, sound recording, and lighting and editing, as they apply specifically to the documentary process. The demands of documentary expression require preparation with a different emphasis from that which applies to the personal and experimental approaches to filmmaking and video making. Materials and texts will cost approx. $50. Lab fee: $100. Class size is strictly limited.

    Fulfills Basic Production Requirement.

  • DMS 105B BASIC DOCUMENTARY

    Staff :: TR 11:00AM – 12:50PM :: CFA 286
    REG#18196

    This course will present students with the fundamental, theoretical, creative, and technical concerns of documentary and video production. Students will be introduced to methods of research, production design, approach to subject, interviewing and the structuring of information, as well as the technical video skills of camera work, sound recording, and lighting and editing, as they apply specifically to the documentary process. The demands of documentary expression require preparation with a different emphasis from that which applies to the personal and experimental approaches to filmmaking and video making. Materials and texts will cost approx. $50. Lab fee: $100. Class size is strictly limited.

    Fulfills Basic Production Requirement.

  • DMS 108 FILM & MEDIA HISTORY II

    Staff :: T/TH 11-12:50 :: CFA 112
    REG#15324

    Film History will expose students to screenings and scholarship chronicling the political and technological conditions of film production from the 1890’s to the present. We will broadly examine early motion pictures, pre-code Hollywood, German Expressionism, French Impressionism and Surrealism, Soviet Montage, Neorealist, the French New Wave, Post-Colonial African filmmaking, 1970’s Hollywood, digital filmmaking, and large format documentary. Attendance, readings, weekly response journal, and research paper are required.

  • DMS 109 FILM INTERPRETATION

    Staff :: TR 9:00am-10:50am :: CFA 112
    REG#15599

    Film Aesthetics have had an enormous impact on the development of media, from television to the internet to video games, as well as on our personal experiences of our everyday lives: “I feel like I’m in a movie!” This course provides an introduction to the main concepts and themes that constitute the rapidly expanding field of Film Studies. In this course, we will learn to recognize the techniques and conventions that structure our experience of cinema – narrative, mise-en-scene, cinematography, editing, sound, genre – in order to understand how these various components combine to yield an overall sense of film form. We will survey global film history, critically viewing examples of silent film, classical Hollywood, world cinema, experimental, documentary, and independent narrative film. We will also examine isolated clips from a variety of films as they relate to the weekly discussion topics.

    Fulfills Intro To Interpretation Requirement.

  • DMS 110 PROGRAMMING FOR DIGITAL ART

    Staff :: M/W 1-2:50pm :: CFA 244
    REG#15954

    Beginner programming course geared towards Media Study majors with little to no experience who want to pursue Programming Graphics, Game Design and Virtual Reality. This course introduces basic concepts of Computer Science with the Python programming language, while incorporating a Media Study perspective. Non Majors welcome if space available. Lab fee: $100.

    Fulfills Basic Production Requirement.

  • DMS 121 BASIC DIGITAL ARTS

    Staff :: MW 9:00AM – 10:50AM :: CFA 244
    REG#18477

    This course will present fundamental concepts and methods that underlie the use of computers in generating and processing digital works and examine them in the context of contemporary artistic practice in painting, photography, film, and video. The impact of computers, both present and potential, on the more traditional arts will be discussed. Through the use of imaging audio and presentation software, students will explore the various ways in which computers deal with images, sound and structures, adapting these methods to produce work of their own. Work by contemporary artists working in the digital medium will be shown and examined on a regular basis. The class size is strictly limited. Lab fee: $100.

    Fulfills Basic Production Requirement.

  • DMS 121 BASIC DIGITAL ARTS

    Staff :: T/TH 9:00AM – 10:50AM :: CFA 244
    REG#18244

    This course will present fundamental concepts and methods that underlie the use of computers in generating and processing digital works and examine them in the context of contemporary artistic practice in painting, photography, film, and video. The impact of computers, both present and potential, on the more traditional arts will be discussed. Through the use of imaging audio and presentation software, students will explore the various ways in which computers deal with images, sound and structures, adapting these methods to produce work of their own. Work by contemporary artists working in the digital medium will be shown and examined on a regular basis. The class size is strictly limited. Lab fee: $100.

    Fulfills Basic Production Requirement.

  • DMS 155 INTRODUCTION TO NEW MEDIA

    Staff :: M/W 11:00AM – 12:50PM :: CFA 244
    Lecture REG#15605
    Lab REG#10694

    This course provides an introduction to design and the production of interactive multimedia. The content of the class will focus on the theoretical and practical aspects of creating and integrating digital media with authoring/presentation tools. This class will lay the foundation for creating interactive projects for the web and will integrate art, journalism, and music through hands-on developmental projects in our new state-of-the-art Mac lab. Students will learn the process and skills necessary to create a web site and an interactive CD-ROM which integrates animation, graphic design, sound, and text, working in Adobe Photoshop, Dreamweaver, Flash animation, and Illustrator. The course will accommodate 48 students. Enroll now! Get the technological edge! Lab fee $100.

    Fulfills Basic Production Requirement.

  • DMS 212 INDIAN IMAGE ON FILM

    Staff :: T 4:10 – 6:50pm :: Location tba
    Reg#14668

    Explore Hollywood “Indians” through major motion pictures, B Westerns, documentaries, “indies,” and TV episodes (all viewed in class). See how Indigenous filmmakers use stereotypical representations mixed with humor to counter Hollywood’s legacy. Inves-tigate ways the camera tells a different story than the dialog. Examine the visual impact films have on our perceptions of “Indian” history and cultures. Consider how Hollywood’s reel reality stacks up against the Indigenous real reality.

  • DMS 212 PLASMA

    Teri Rueb, Tony Conrad, Paige Sarlin :: M 6:30-8:30pm :: CFA112
    Reg#23315

    Performances, Lectures, and Screenings in Media Art (PLASMA) is a course in which students are exposed to contemporary practices and discourses in media art and culture. Beyond the model of a lecture series course, PLASMA engages students in performative, field-based and workshop encounters with professional practitioners operating at national and international levels of visibility. Every other week brings a guest to the course, with alternating weeks providing an opportunity for critical reflection and discussion. Readings are assigned to complement topics addressed in the work of guest practitioners, including publications of their own, where relevant.
    The course is part of the undergraduate foundations sequence in Media Study, but is also open to graduate students who meet in a graduate only section for the alternating weeks that are designated for critical reflection and discussion. Lab fee: $100 (to assist with costs of workshops, field trips and other special programming).

    This course will fulfill Media and Culture or as an elective.

     

  • DMS 213 IMMIGRATION & FILM

    Staff :: MW 1:00PM – 2:50PM :: CFA 112
    REG#15876

    By looking at representative examples of American and foreign films, this course will critically examine the role of cinema in the construction and exploration of the figure of the racial, ethnic, cultural and social theory. Our topics will include (1) racial, ethnic and cultural identity and its reciprocal relationship with cinema, (2) the notion of realism in relation to the representation of race and ethnicity in film, (3) the cinematic representation of inter-ethnic and intra-ethnic conflict, (4) the position of cinema in the debate between assimilation and multiculturalism. Films will be screened in class and discussed against the background of focused critical readings. The aim of the course is to provide you with an opportunity to develop your critical thinking and writing abilities through class discussions, close readings of films and critical literature, and writing assignments. The course fulfills the American Pluralism requirement.

    Fulfills the American Pluralism requirement or Media and Culture or Media Study Elective.

  • DMS 213 IMMIGRATION & FILM

    Staff :: TR 9:00AM – 10:50PM :: CFA 232
    reg#18101

    By looking at representative examples of American and foreign films, this course will critically examine the role of cinema in the construction and exploration of the figure of the racial, ethnic, cultural and social theory. Our topics will include (1) racial, ethnic and cultural identity and its reciprocal relationship with cinema, (2) the notion of realism in relation to the representation of race and ethnicity in film, (3) the cinematic representation of inter-ethnic and intra-ethnic conflict, (4) the position of cinema in the debate between assimilation and multiculturalism. Films will be screened in class and discussed against the background of focused critical readings. The aim of the course is to provide you with an opportunity to develop your critical thinking and writing abilities through class discussions, close readings of films and critical literature, and writing assignments.

    Fulfills the American Pluralism requirement or Media and Culture or Media Study Elective.

     

  • DMS 215 CREATIVE TECHNOLOGY WORKSHOP

    staff :: Friday, 9:00AM – 12:40PM :: CFA246
    REG#23468

    This course is divided into three five week modules: each module focuses on media and tech-based skills in a creative, collaborative, applications-based context. The three modules this semester are:
    * creative projection scenarios * – Projection technology is increasingly used in art installation, music performance, and theatrical design – experiment with image capture, manipulation and projection layered over physical artifacts.
    * wearable and ‘soft’ computing * – Use soft circuitry techniques (Lilypad Arduino, conductive paint, fabric, etc.) in the design and development of expressive and wearable projects. Focus on relationships between the body, technology, fashion, social interactions, and the environment.
    * Can you tell your story in 15 secs? Can you get it online in minutes keeping quality standards? How can your ideas become viral? – This module focuses on short-video sharing apps, mobile phone image capture, and fast/online editing for social networks and the web.

    Lab fee: $100

    This course will fulfill Intermediate Production or as an elective.

  • DMS 216 CREATIVE TECHNOLOGY WORKSHOP

    staff :: Friday, 1:00PM – 4:40PM :: CFA246
    REG#15296

    This course is divided into three five week modules: each module focuses on media and tech-based skills in a creative, collaborative, applications-based context. The three modules this semester are:
    * creative projection scenarios * – Projection technology is increasingly used in art installation, music performance, and theatrical design – experiment with image capture, manipulation and projection layered over physical artifacts.
    * wearable and ‘soft’ computing * – Use soft circuitry techniques (Lilypad Arduino, conductive paint, fabric, etc.) in the design and development of expressive and wearable projects. Focus on relationships between the body, technology, fashion, social interactions, and the environment.
    * Can you tell your story in 15 secs? Can you get it online in minutes keeping quality standards? How can your ideas become viral? – This module focuses on short-video sharing apps, mobile phone image capture, and fast/online editing for social networks and the web.

    Lab fee: $100

    This course will fulfill Intermediate Production or as an elective.

  • DMS 217 CINEMATOGRAPHY: DIRECTING THE LENS

    staff :: M/W, 11:00AM – 12:50PM :: CFA235
    REG#15641

    Image Making for Cinematographers and Directors
    Prerequisites: Basic Video DMS103 or Basic Documentary DMS 105
    This intermediate workshop course seeks to further develop student’s skills of storytelling with the camera. When we create a film project, one of the primary tasks is to create a visual world for the characters to inhabit. Cinematography is the process of taking ideas, words, actions, emotional subtext, tone, and all other forms of non-verbal communication and rendering them in visual terms. From screenplay analysis to shot composition, students learn how Directors and Cinematographers collaborate to achieve a complete vision. Students explore the aesthetic elements of mise-en scene, shot choice, composition, setting, point of view, action of the picture plane and movement of the camera. The course will delve into advanced cinematography skills such as scene staging using elements of composition and camera technology based on creative considerations and the overall visual concept of the story. Students are introduced to how lighting is used to set a mood and convey the tone and drama of a scene, gain proficiency in maintaining lighting continuity, understand and use motivated lighting sources and how light can be used to depict time-of-day.
    The course seeks to demonstrate how choices made by the cinematographer and director on the set affect editing decisions, through an understanding of coverage and continuity. The course will introduce concepts for maintaining a consistent visual “look” in the cinematography and further develop an understanding of post-production tools, particularly color and exposure corrections. Students will learn the responsibilities of the camera department on a film production and how cinematographers work with members of other production departments, particularly lighting and grip.
    Exercises, workshops and productions, supported by critical and analytical study of the history and development of cinematography, give students a solid foundation in the art and craft of their future career.
    Lab fee: $100

  • DMS 259 INTRO TO MEDIA ANALYSIS

    staff :: M/W 11am-12:50pm :: CFA 112
    REG#15936

    An introduction to the key forms that constitute media in modern culture: photography, film, recorded sound, print, television, video, and digital media. This course will expose students to a range of critical accounts of different media – considering media as representational forms as well as aesthetic, social, and/or political practices. We will examine both the material components that define various media and the historical and social functions that they serve. Lectures, screenings, and discussions will be structured by major theoretical concepts and approaches drawn from the disciplines of film and media studies, critical theory, and cultural studies. This course will provide a solid theoretical foundation for all forms of media study – including both production and analysis.

    This course fulfill introduction to interpretation.

  • DMS 341 INTERMEDIATE VIDEO WKSHP: EXPERIMENTAL CINEMA

    McCormick :: Tuesday – 5:00PM – 8:40PM :: CFA286
    REG#15761

    Prereqs: DMS 103 or 105

    Experimental Cinema is a broad and hard to define topic, but most agree that at its core it is a practice fueled by creative exploration that resists trends of traditional Hollywood filmmaking. This hybrid production/theory course will explore the history, practice, and sub-genres of experimental film and video making while engaging in various artistic and technical exercises designed to heighten our creative and mechanical understanding of movie-making. The class will cover many ideas associated with experimental cinema, but focus primarily on 4 specific genres: hand manipulated film, found footage, experimental documentary, and experimental narrative. In class we will be screening and discussing works, styles, and techniques, and engaging in creative exercises, while outside of class students will be creating a short final project that will be screened at the conclusion of the semester. This is an intermediate level production course- students should have a basic understanding of camera, sound, and editing tools and be prepared to work both independently and in groups.

    Lab fee: $100

    Fulfills * Intermediate Production requirement.

  • DMS 375 SCIENCE, CULTURE & MEDIA

    Nickard :: M/W, 3:15PM – 4:35PM :: CFA144
    REG#16396

    Introduces critical issues in science, culture, and emerging media-especially as they pertain to contemporary artistic practice. Topics are addressed through artists’ works; selected readings include historical trends, biotechnology, virtuality, net theory, and cultural resistance. Lab fee.

     

  • DMS 403 ADVANCED DOCUMENTARY PROD

    Mistretta :: T/TH 1:00PM – 2:50PM :: CFA 235
    REG#23508

    This course is an advanced workshop in which students create an original documentary project in video (or film, still photography, audio or web-based formats with the permission of instructor). Creativity and originality will be stressed with exercises to encourage “seeing”, “listening” and artistic risk taking. Individual projects may go in many creative directions including the political, personal, humorous, experimental, conventional, transgressive, ethnographic, client-based or activist. Students will gain a solid understanding of contemporary non-fiction forms and the particular problems which non-fiction makers face. Films by contemporary artists will be shown on a regular basis with special attention to experimental documentary work. We will look at dramatic structure, story telling, and narrative/non-narrative forms of editing. Emphasis will be given to production techniques which bring access and intimacy to the video subject and integrity to the documentary. The course will explore ethical issues and problems of privacy and intrusion. Students will develop production skills in research, fieldwork, collaboration, interviewing, location sound recording, camera skills, and production management. Each student will produce one short documentary piece, with supporting assignments in shooting, sound, and digital editing. A written production book will be required. A class film festival ends the semester. Prerequisite: DMS Basic Documentary, or DMS Basic Video and DMS Intermediate Video. Lab fee: $100. Attendance is mandatory.

    Lab fee: $100

    Fulfills Advanced Production.

  • DMS 413 FILMIC TEXT: COLOR AND THE MOVING IMAGE

    Shilina-Conte :: Thursday 4:00PM – 7:40PM :: CFA112
    REG#23472

    A feast for the eyes, this class will take you on an “over the rainbow tour” of color history and effects in cinema. “There never was a silent film,” Irving Thalberg famously declared, and just as with sound, color has accompanied cinema since its inception. Early filmmakers employed applied processes such as hand-painting, stenciling, tinting and toning, long before the advent of such photographic systems as Technicolor and Eastmancolor. After a brief overview of the history of cinematic color, we will concentrate on its expressive and affective use as a means of evoking atmosphere, establishing mood and conveying implicit messages. We will examine color palettes of various directors, comparing Tom Tykwer’s saturated and succulent reds and yellows with Andrey Tarkovsky’s subdued and subtle greens and browns. We will also discuss the concept of synesthesia and color’s ability to create cross-communication among the senses through visual outbursts of emotion. The discourse of color has become a widely addressed topic in the post-cinematic age, as it raises questions of the preservation and restoration of moving images, changing notions of archiving, and the introduction of new digital effects. Films and excerpts will include a number of early shorts, The Adventures of Prince Achmed, Flowers and Trees, Becky Sharp, Ivan the Terrible, The Red Balloon, Kwaidan, Shadows of Forgotten Ancestors, Trois Couleurs, Cyclo, 20 Fingers, and The Fall, among others.

    This course will fulfill advanced analysis.

  • DMS 415 COMPUTATIONAL MEDIA: INTERFACING COMPLEXITY

    Bohlen :: M2-5:40pm :: CFA246
    REG#23484

    New washing machines have become too complicated to operate without a manual while some automobiles alert drivers of problems of unknown severity with a single blinking ‘engine light’, a new source of 21st century anxiety. Such experiences are the result of not only poor design, but of inadequate mapping of complex events.
    This seminar / lab will investigate how experiential interfaces (visual, audio, haptic), and the software that controls them, interact with complex systems ‘underneath’. Interfaces to complex systems depend on how a problem is conceptually modeled, how it is abstracted into a technical artifact, how adaptable it is to varying contexts, and how it is communicated to people. The course will investigate the mapping of complexity form source to interface and consider technical, as well as social and cultural contexts in the process. Students will be asked to identify a terrible design ‘solution’ and present research artifacts that recast the problem and propose an alternate design approach as a semester project.
    Open to graduate students and advanced undergrads by consent of instructor.

    This course will fulfill advanced analysis or advanced production.

  • DMS 416 THEORIES OF MONTAGE AND REPRESENTATION

    Shilina-Conte :: Tuesday 4pm-7:40pm :: CFA235
    REG#23486

    This class will be structured as a comprehensive overview of the theory and practice of montage and representation in global media. Topics for discussion will include staging-in-depth (Bordwell), the Soviet montage school (Eisenstein, Kuleshov, Pudovkin, Vertov), American continuity style, rational and irrational/serial montage (Deleuze), spatiotemporal montage and montage-within-the-shot (Manovich), cinemetrics (Tsivian), QuickTime movies and “memory boxes” (Sobchack), etc. We will trace technological developments in film and digital media that permitted a shift from single frame shots (sequence) to multiple frames, windows and screens (multiplicity). Our special agenda in this class will be to focus on monochrome frames as points of rupture, where they are seen as simultaneously alien and integral to the field of the image. In these cases the cut often functions as both a “scar,” the visible evidence of a filmic cutting/psychic wounding, and a “threshold,” the invisible passage between suppressed history and troubling memory. From these reservoirs of invisible evidence in cinema swarm forth a host of critical issues such as ethnicity, race, sexuality, gender, ethics, trauma and censorship. The topics discussed in this class will help us to understand the connection between cinematic form and content and place mediated representations into social, cultural and historical contexts. Films and excerpts by Sergey Eisenstein, Dziga Vertov, Abel Gance, Jean-Luc Godard, Alain Resnais, Peter Greenaway, Chris Marker, Jim Jarmusch, Derek Jarman, Mania Akbari, Su Friedrich, Marlon Riggs, Alexander Sokurov and Carolee Schneeman will be considered. This class would be indispensable both for students interested in learning how to interpret film and media critically, as well as students who wish to become better editors/makers of their own films/media. Fulfills the Advanced Analysis, Media and Culture or Media Study Electives.

    Fulfills the Advanced Analysis, Media and Culture or Media Study Electives.

  • DMS 417 ADVANCED VIDEO WITH TONY CONRAD

    Conrad :: W 5:00PM – 8:40PM ::  Cfa 286
    REG#15756

    “My personal work feels like an oil slick on this flowing current, spreading in two or three directions at once”- Tony Conrad

    This is an advanced production course with Professor Tony Conrad. Tony has been doing research tracing the “science and technology” history of music all the way back into the 17th century, while also working with Tony Oursler on his Influence Machine project, which addresses the twinning of communications and spiritualism in the nineteenth century. He has been a constant and dedicated contributor to the media community here in Western NY—whether through our regional media centers, or public access cable TV, or the galleries and museum here. Much of his artistic production (and visibility) in recent years has been in audio performance or installation, often with a strong visual complement.

  • DMS 425 VISUAL MEDIA POETICS

    Glazier :: T 3:00PM – 6:40PM :: CFA232
    REG#20594

     

    Please Note: This course will be given in coordination with DMS 603 Graduate Media Poetics. Course content may vary according to the number of students enrolled under each number. Your flexibility is appreciated!

    DMS 425. VISUAL MEDIA/FILM POETICS. SPRING 2013. Visual Media Poetics investigates the visual aspects of the work of media art, looking at various genres of art-making across media, with attention to visual aspects. On what levels do the visual aspects of a work contribute to the overall fabric of the work of art? What “poetics” means in this context is involves thinking about how visuality is expressed, how it is made, what makes it artistically interesting. To answer these questions, works of digital media, film, and text that mark definitive milestones as visually fluent media works will be examined in depth, including a number of films, digital works, and textual works include films directors such as Almodovar, Antonioni, Kubrick, Lisandro Alonso, Julio Medem, Herzog, Kurosawa, Fellini, etc., digital works by Pierre Alfieri, David Jhave Johnston, Roderick Coover, and others, and textual works including poetry, artist’s books, visually-oriented digital poetry language works, and early experimental works in all media. Of interest, also, is the relationship to such films to dream, the subconscious, alternative modes of thinking, philosophical concepts, and contemporary theory. There are many directions we can pursue! We will look at works of Concrete and digital poetry and consider these as models for digital media design. We will look at theoretical essays and manifestos related to visual media practice, investigating modes and means of visual media expression, as seen through a number of documentary and narrative sources. Methods will include close reading of films, digital works, and creative and critical texts. Visual poetics is about watching observantly and reading poetic texts closely. Course meets once a week for 3 hours to allow screening time and discussion of films. Note: A significant number of films may be in Spanish or other languages (with subtitles). Course requirements: Weekly readings, a class journal, an oral presentation, a final project, exams, and quizzes as necessary. Attendance is crucial. Course text: TBA.

    For Media Study majors, this course fulfills advanced analysis or Media Study elective.

  • DMS 435 SCRIPTWRITING: ALL MEDIA

    Anstey :: M/W 11am-12:50pm :: cfa242
    Reg#20598

    In this production workshop students will concentrate on writing and editing text/script elements for their media projects. The course will explore both traditional and experimental methods for generating and structuring text for all kinds of media project (games, film, installation, data-base, video, animation, performance, interactive-story). The media project can be fictional or documentary. Texts may include original writing, interview material, collaged or found fragments, to be performed, heard or displayed in the final piece. The texts may be linear, non-linear, interactive, poetic … This opportunity to focus on the text is for students at any stage of a project (conception through finishing) and those working with English as a second language or with translated material.

  • DMS 442 ADVANCED VIDEO PRODUCTION

    Braemer :: T/TH 9:00AM – 10:50AM :: CFA235
    REG#23488

    This course will be a production-intensive class focusing on completion of a
    longer project. We will study and create individualized distribution
    strategies for video work, screen and discuss a variety of documentary,
    fiction and experimental work, and, in addition to the longer project, work
    on a series of short video-sketches as a collective class project.

  • DMS 447 SOUND DESIGN

    Bouquard :: M/W 1:00PM – 2:50PM :: CFA232
    REG#19315

    The object of sound design is to explore issues and techniques in the area of sound design and digital audio production. The “visual” media –film and video- are powerfully inflected by their accompanying audio tracks, which frequently convey the work’s preponderant sensibility, or even its core meaning. This course will prepare students technically, conceptually and musically to work with audio. Lab fee $100.

    This course fulfills intermediate or advanced production.

  • DMS 455 SOCIAL WEB MEDIA

    Clark :: M/W 1:00PM – 2:50PM :: CFA 235
    Reg # 19515

    What does social media look like after the recent world events? How will the advent of Google+ and emerging social media change the landscape of the social web? What comes after social media? How will you use it? What will you create? This class combines analysis of web media in terms of participation and community formation with practical skills needed to shape the future of social media. We will examine social networking sites, blogging, peer-to-peer networks, reputation economies, mobile communication technologies, activism, and surveillance while developing a critical framework for discussing the state of networked culture. We will also gain a practical understanding of New Media through the use and creation of our own social web tools.

    This fulfill advanced analysis or an elective.

  • DMS 461 MACHINES, CODES, CULTURE

    Bohlen :: M W , 9:00 AM – 10:50 AM :: cfa 112
    REG:23491

    This course will follow the history of machines and coding systems from the monastery bell to the latest humanoid robot; from the origins of numeric notation to protocols of cloud computing in select episodes. This is not a history course, but an overview of concepts related to information technologies that substantially impact daily life. Consequently, the course will focus on cultural aspects of technologies and the myriad ways in which they are woven into the fabric of human activities, both in personal and public domains. Topics will include numbering systems, information and encoding, autonomous robots, interaction design, household smart appliances, the Internet of Things, social media and cloud computing. Students will introduced to these concepts through texts and guided through them in weekly discussions. Materials will be gathered from diverse authors such as: Lewis Mumford, Paul Virilio, Harun Farocki, Friedrich Kittler, Michel Foucault, Caroline Marvin, Hans Moravec, Marvin Minsky, Sherry Turkle, Bruno Latour, Reviel Netz and others. Grades will be based on a semester position paper, a multiple choice exam and participation in class discussions. We will watch videos. Open to all students!

    This course will fulfill advanced analysis.

  • DMS 462 GAME DESIGN

    Pape :: M/W 9 – 10:50AM :: CFA242
    REG#23492

    Production course on the design of games, both computer-based and analog.Games are considered as a new art form and in order to create compelling games, students must be aware of the particularities of the form in both structural and aesthetic terms. Clearly the most important difference between games and other art forms are the interactive and interpersonal dynamics of gaming. Core isues of game design; what is a game? what is the nature of play? what makes for good game play? what are the core characteristics and structure of a game? and what are the roles of engagement, narrative, and interactivity in games? Encourages experimental thinking about the boundaries and possibilities of games. Students work in teams to produce a complete game. Thorough, hands-on grounding in the process of game design, including brainstorming, paper prototyping, play-testing, and iterative design. From conception to play-testing, and fosters the skills required to produce, examine, and critique games.
    Lab fee $100.
    Fulfills Intermediate Production requirement

  • DMS 496 (1- 4 CR VARIABLE) MEDIA ARTS INTERNSHIP

    Staff
    REG# Permission of Instructor

    Media Study majors have the opportunity to gain variable academic credit for internships in local and national media production companies, television stations, cable companies, and media access centers. This is an unpaid internship available to majors. Guidelines are set by an internship supervisor in collaboration with a faculty sponsor to provide hands-on practical experience in an on-the-job training program. For registration information, see Dean Sanborn in 248 CFA.

    Media Study Elective.

  • DMS 499 (1-4 CR VARIABLE) INDEPENDENT STUDY

    Staff
    REG# Permission of Instructor 
    Students may arrange for special courses of study with faculty through “Independent Study.” The instructor will set the guidelines for the course on an individual basis. It permits the student to study, independently, in an area where no course is given. Syllabus for Independent Study should be prepared prior to semester, signed by the instructor, with one copy on file with the department. For registration information, see Luann Zak in 231 CFA. Lab fee for production work: $100

    Media Study Elective.