Fall 2012

DMS Fall 2012 Undergraduate Course Descriptions

DMS Undergraduate Class Schedule – fall 2012

DMS 101 BASIC FILM MAKING
Staff :: MW 9:00 – 10:50pm :: CFA 278
REG# 20369

This course is intended to provide a basic introduction to 16mm film production. Classes will include screenings, lectures, and demonstrations. Students will learn basic camera operation, lighting, editing, and sound acquisition. In addition, the course will explore the critical relationship between theory and practice in the context of film production. Students will be required to complete collaborative class projects, individual assignments, and a critical paper. Each student will also be required to complete a short, non-sync, 16mm film project. Class materials will cost approx. $150. Lab fee: $100. Class size is strictly limited. Fulfills Basic Production Requirement.

DMS 103A BASIC VIDEO
Staff :: MW 9:00AM/10:50PM :: CFA 232
REG#20590

This course is a basic introduction to the tools and techniques of video production. Students will become familiar with using video and develop strategies for its application as an alternative medium of communication. Crucial to this project is the concurrent development of a critical perspective on mainstream media culture. Video art screenings and readings in media theory will critically address the relations between viewers, producers, and the media. Students must expect to acquire materials and texts costing approx. $50.00 to be used in exercises in classroom presentations. Access to equipment and editing facilities will be available. Lab fee: $100. Class size is strictly limited. Fulfills Basic Production Requirement.

DMS 103B BASIC VIDEO
Staff :: TR 9:00am-10:50pm :: CFA 235
REG#12830

This course is a basic introduction to the tools and techniques of video production. Students will become familiar with using video and develop strategies for its application as an alternative medium of communication. Crucial to this project is the concurrent development of a critical perspective on mainstream media culture. Video art screenings and readings in media theory will critically address the relations between viewers, producers, and the media. Students must expect to acquire materials and texts costing approx. $50.00 to be used in exercises in classroom presentations. Access to equipment and editing facilities will be available. Lab fee: $100. Class size is strictly limited. Fulfills Basic Production Requirement.

DMS 105A BASIC DOCUMENTARY
Staff :: MW 11:00am-12:50pm :: CFA 278
REG#16621

This course will present students with the fundamental, theoretical, creative, and technical concerns of documentary and video production. Students will be introduced to methods of research, production design, approach to subject, interviewing and the structuring of information, as well as the technical video skills of camera work, sound recording, and lighting and editing, as they apply specifically to the documentary process. The demands of documentary expression require preparation with a different emphasis from that which applies to the personal and experimental approaches to filmmaking and video making. Materials and texts will cost approx. $50. Lab fee: $100. Class size is strictly limited. Fulfills Basic Production Requirement.

DMS 105B BASIC DOCUMENTARY
Staff :: TR 9:00AM – 10:50AM :: CFA 278
REG#13654

This course will present students with the fundamental, theoretical, creative, and technical concerns of documentary and video production. Students will be introduced to methods of research, production design, approach to subject, interviewing and the structuring of information, as well as the technical video skills of camera work, sound recording, and lighting and editing, as they apply specifically to the documentary process. The demands of documentary expression require preparation with a different emphasis from that which applies to the personal and experimental approaches to filmmaking and video making. Materials and texts will cost approx. $50. Lab fee: $100. Class size is strictly limited. Fulfills Basic Production Requirement.

DMS 107 FILM HISTORY 1
Staff :: M/W 11-12:50 :: CFA 112
REG# 13938

Film History will expose students to screenings and scholarship chronicling the political and technological conditions of film production from the 1890’s to the present. We will broadly examine early motion pictures, pre-code Hollywood, German Expressionism, French Impressionism and Surrealism, Soviet Montage, Neorealist, the French New Wave, Post-Colonial African filmmaking, 1970’s Hollywood, digital filmmaking, and large format documentary. Attendance, readings, weekly response journal, and research paper are required.

DMS 109 FILM INTERPRETATION
Staff :: TR 9:00am-10:50am :: CFA 112
REG#17438

Film Aesthetics have had an enormous impact on the development of media, from television to the internet to video games, as well as on our personal experiences of our everyday lives: “I feel like I’m in a movie!” This course provides an introduction to the main concepts and themes that constitute the rapidly expanding field of Film Studies. In this course, we will learn to recognize the techniques and conventions that structure our experience of cinema – narrative, mise-en-scene, cinematography, editing, sound, genre – in order to understand how these various components combine to yield an overall sense of film form. We will survey global film history, critically viewing examples of silent film, classical Hollywood, world cinema, experimental, documentary, and independent narrative film. We will also examine isolated clips from a variety of films as they relate to the weekly discussion topics. Fulfills Intro To Interpretation Requirement.

DMS 110 PROGRAMMING FOR DIGITAL ART
Staff :: M/W 9-10:50 :: CFA 242
REG#10953

Beginner programming course geared towards Media Study majors with little to no experience who want to pursue Programming Graphics, Game Design and Virtual Reality. This course introduces basic concepts of Computer Science with the Python programming language, while incorporating a Media Study perspective. Non Majors welcome if space available. Lab fee: $100. Fulfills Basic Production Requirement.

DMS 121A BASIC DIGITAL ARTS
Staff :: MW 9:00am-10:50am :: CFA 244
REG#20370

This course will present fundamental concepts and methods that underlie the use of computers in generating and processing digital works and examine them in the context of contemporary artistic practice in painting, photography, film, and video. The impact of computers, both present and potential, on the more traditional arts will be discussed. Through the use of imaging audio and presentation software, students will explore the various ways in which computers deal with images, sound and structures, adapting these methods to produce work of their own. Work by contemporary artists working in the digital medium will be shown and examined on a regular basis. The class size is strictly limited. Lab fee: $100. Fulfills Basic Production Requirement.

DMS 121B BASIC DIGITAL ARTS
Staff :: MW 11:00AM – 12:50PM :: CFA 244
REG#12317

This course will present fundamental concepts and methods that underlie the use of computers in generating and processing digital works and examine them in the context of contemporary artistic practice in painting, photography, film, and video. The impact of computers, both present and potential, on the more traditional arts will be discussed. Through the use of imaging audio and presentation software, students will explore the various ways in which computers deal with images, sound and structures, adapting these methods to produce work of their own. Work by contemporary artists working in the digital medium will be shown and examined on a regular basis. The class size is strictly limited. Lab fee: $100. Fulfills Basic Production Requirement.

DMS 155 INTRODUCTION TO NEW MEDIA
Staff :: M/W 1:00pm – 2:50pm :: CFA 244
Lecture REG#16699
Lab REG#11089

This course provides an introduction to design and the production of interactive multimedia. The content of the class will focus on the theoretical and practical aspects of creating and integrating digital media with authoring/presentation tools. This class will lay the foundation for creating interactive projects for the web and will integrate art, journalism, and music through hands-on developmental projects in our new state-of-the-art Mac lab. Students will learn the process and skills necessary to create a web site and an interactive CD-ROM which integrates animation, graphic design, sound, and text, working in Adobe Photoshop, Dreamweaver, Flash animation, and Illustrator. The course will accommodate 48 students. Enroll now! Get the technological edge! Lab fee $100 Fulfills Basic Production Requirement.

DMS 193 INTRO TO JOURNALISM
Galarneau :: W 7-9:40 :: Clemens 19
REG#19596

DMS 212 INDIAN IMAGE ON FILM
McCarthy :: T 4:10-6:50 :: Clemens 19
REG#11611

Course is crosslisted with American Studies. For more information, refer to the course descriptions on the Department of American Studies website. Fulfills the Media & Culture requirement.

DMS 213 IMMIGRATION & FILM
Staff :: MW 1:00PM – 2:50PM :: CFA 112
REG#23004

By looking at representative examples of American and foreign films, this course will critically examine the role of cinema in the construction and exploration of the figure of the racial, ethnic, cultural and social theory. Our topics will include (1) racial, ethnic and cultural identity and its reciprocal relationship with cinema, (2) the notion of realism in relation to the representation of race and ethnicity in film, (3) the cinematic representation of inter-ethnic and intra-ethnic conflict, (4) the position of cinema in the debate between assimilation and multiculturalism. Films will be screened in class and discussed against the background of focused critical readings. The aim of the course is to provide you with an opportunity to develop your critical thinking and writing abilities through class discussions, close readings of films and critical literature, and writing assignments. The course fulfills the American Pluralism requirement. Fulfills the American Pluralism requirement or Media and Culture or Media Study Elective.

DMS 213 IMMIGRATION & FILM
Staff :: TR 9:00AM – 10:50PM :: CFA 232
reg#17414

By looking at representative examples of American and foreign films, this course will critically examine the role of cinema in the construction and exploration of the figure of the racial, ethnic, cultural and social theory. Our topics will include (1) racial, ethnic and cultural identity and its reciprocal relationship with cinema, (2) the notion of realism in relation to the representation of race and ethnicity in film, (3) the cinematic representation of inter-ethnic and intra-ethnic conflict, (4) the position of cinema in the debate between assimilation and multiculturalism. Films will be screened in class and discussed against the background of focused critical readings. The aim of the course is to provide you with an opportunity to develop your critical thinking and writing abilities through class discussions, close readings of films and critical literature, and writing assignments. Fulfills the American Pluralism requirement or Media and Culture or Media Study Elective.

DMS 217 INTERMEDIATE EDITING
Staff :: T/TH 1-2:50 :: CFA 278
REG#23975

DMS 218 CREATIVE VIDEO WORKSHOP
Staff :: M/W 1-2:50 :: CFA 278
REG#22996

Prerequisites: DMS 103 or DMS 105.

This course is a workshop in the tools of video, and an introduction to grant writing and budget creation. It offers exercises in video production for students who have had some previous experience with video as a creative medium, and the opportunity to learn about and apply current granting formats, using in class projects for grant proposals. The course will emphasize the development of technical skills and knowledge, which are necessary for the effective use of video as an artistic tool and for documentation or personal expression. The student will produce a series of projects using cameras, lighting, editing, and other aspects of production and post-production. Using cross-culture material to create video work, each student will need to spend a substantial amount of time working with studio, portable, and editing facilities outside the regular class hours. In addition, some outside videotape viewing, gallery visits, as well as short papers will be required. Reading will include classroom handouts in addition to the assigned book. $100 lab fee.

. This course can count towards the “non- *” Intermediate Production course or as an elective.

DMS 218 CREATIVE VIDEO WORKSHOP: OBSERVATION AND PLACE
McCormick, M :: T 5:00 PM – 8:40 PM :: CFA278
REG# 24249

contact info: matt@rodeofilmco.com

Prerequisites: DMS 103 or DMS 105.

This class combines study of travelogue, landscape film, and direct cinema with creative exercises and projects to foster deeper perceptive-experiences. We will explore filmmaking as a disciplined way of seeing, of investigating environments, and expressing ideas. Through screenings, discussion, and filmmaking assignments, we will explore ideas of “thinking cinematically” and consider the differences between being a spectator and an observer. We will shed our preconceived notions of beauty and importance, focusing on opening our minds to our immediate environments and becoming more astute observers and creative documentarians.

In this class we will study the work of artists such as Deborah Stratman, Edward Burtynsky, Lucien Castaing-Taylor and Ilisa Barbash, Jem Cohen, The Center of Land Use Interpretation, Naomi Uman, Bill Brown, the Maysles Brothers and more while also engaging in artistic exercises and projects. Students should have a handle on basic camera, sound, and editing operation, as this is a production course and students will be required to spend significant time outside of class producing short film/video assignments. Students should be prepared to work individually to create video and audio projects. Reading will include classroom handouts in addition to the assigned book. $100 lab fee.

. This course can count towards the “non- *” Intermediate Production course or as an elective.

DMS 225 DIGITAL LITERATURE SURVEY
Glazier :: M W , 4:00 PM – 5:50 PM :: Capen 108
REG#24237

DMS 225 Digital Literature Survey, Fall 2012, offers students the opportunity to conduct an intensive survey of the field of digital literature through a focus on literary, visual, and aural elements of language art in the media age. Primary emphasis will be on “reading” the digital texts presented. Course content includes the screening of digital texts, the reading of critical writing about the medium, film screenings, and presentation of other media related to contexts of meaning-making in the digital age. This course, invoking innovative poetry’s relation to digital media, extends media investigations to related issues in film, theory, the phenomenon of the Internet and its relation to “the I”, meaning-making through the context, design, and writerly qualities of Web pages, traditions of hypertext, the materiality of code, the history of e-poetry, and digital media poetry in the academy. For e-poetry, special attention will be given to understanding a broad range of innovative works in the medium including hypertext, digital and kinetic literature, interactive texts, and works in networked and programmable media, and to examining, interpreting, and interrogating the key theoretical texts of the most significant practitioners in the field. The course will include foundational early theory, writings from formative scholarly hypertext theorists, and work by more recent cutting-edge independent digital theorists. Attention will be given to the role of programming as a social, literary, and language-related act. For film and critical material, the course will investigate what changes in perception and art-marking are entered through science, technology, and “future” life. The cultural impact of films related to programming/cyberculture will be discussed, with regular film screenings constituting part of the course content. Discussion of key literary, cybercultural and media theory authors as relevant will occur, with special attention to crucial moments in contemporary poetry that have helped define and shape material approaches to innovative art practice. Online texts will be read as appropriate, especially for a sense of current research in the field. There are NO prerequisites for this class. WARNING: Films may contain subject matter of a sensitive or controversial nature. COURSE REQUIREMENTS: Weekly readings, oral presentations, a film journal, a final project, exams, and quizzes as necessary. Attendance is crucial. For Media Study majors, this course fulfills Advanced Analysis or Media Study Elective.

Online works: Cayley, Rosenberg, Glazier, Memmott, Mencia, Mez, And, Upton, Damon. etc. Poetry: Zukofsky, Pound, Williams, Creeley, Stein, Eigner, Olson, H.D., etc. Music: Art Ensemble of Chicago, Elvin Jones, Henry Threadgill, Charles Mingus, Charlie Parker, Thelonious Monk, etc. Films. Possible screenings include: Tarkofsky, Marker, science films, early Twentieth century experimental cinema, Maya Deren, Lang, Resnais, Brakhage, Makavejev, the Dalai Lama, etc. Theoretical Works: Baudrillard, Derrida, Benjamin, Deleuze, Serres, Panofksy, etc. TEXT. Digital Poetics: the Making of E-Poetries (Loss Pequeño Glazier) at Talking Leaves Books.

DMS 259 INTRO TO MEDIA ANALYSIS
E. Conrad :: M/W 9-10:50 :: CFA 112
REG# 23921

Intro to Media Analysis is an introductory course to Media Analysis examines the rise of especially visual mass media in the 20 th century, from photography, television, and film, to new media. It pays close attention to media historical moments, such as fascism and film in post world war II Italy, or the postmodern turn with the event of digitality. Due to the urgency of political events, we will closely analyze the current media-war-coverage considering mainstream as well as independent media discourses. The respective media are analyzed in light of their materiality. Methodologies vary between Ideology-critique, Cultural Studies, Political Theory, Postmodern Theory, and Semiotics. Students will write essay exams based on course lectures and essays from the course reader. Fulfills Intro to Interpretation.

DMS 315 3D MODELING
Khilji :: MW 2-3:50pm :: CFA242
Reg# 23920

This course is designed to provide students with a basic approach to 3d modeling using Maya. Students will create many different models throughout the semester and learn the fundamentals of modeling with polygons and nurbs, as well as how to create simple animations and set up cameras and lighting. Some Photoshop work will be required to create textures. $100 lab fee. Fulfills non “*” intermediate production requirement or can be used as an elective.

PRIVATE: DMS 333 WORLD CINEMA
Shilina-Conte :: W 6-9:40 :: CFA 112
REG# 23920

DMS 341 INTERMEDIATE VIDEO WORKSHOP
Staff :: TR 11:00am – 12:50pm :: CFA 278
REG#18878

Prereqs: DMS 103 or 105 and Portfolio.

In this course, students will explore and experiment with the video medium through a series of short exercises. Improvement of technical knowledge and skills will be emphasized, and creativity encouraged. Topics to be explored will include: video camera, advanced shooting techniques, sound gathering techniques, microphone placement and selection, non-linear sound editing, lighting techniques for studio and location, non-linear editing. Students learn properties of audio, video and still assets, and practice importing, logging, and insert assembly editing. They also develop a sensitivity to the unique aesthetic and usability criteria of digital video in application environments. Must take DMS 422 concurrently. Fulfills * Intermediate Production requirement.

DMS 402 ADV EDITING
Elder :: T/TH 3-4:50 :: CFA 235
REG#23974

DMS 409 NON-FICTION FILM
Elder :: TR 11:00am-12:50pm :: CFA 235
REG#13212

This course is an exploration of the principal theories of film through a critical reading of texts and a close examination of films. The texts to be perused comprise several groups. Classical film theory includes Munsterburg, Kuleshov, Pudovkin, Eisenstein, Balasz, Arnheim, Bazin, and Godard. The critique of classical film theory includes Burch, Perkins, and Henderson. The course will also explore semiotics, psychoanalysis, and poststructuralism, in Barthes, Eco, Metz , Pasolini, Baudry, Heath, and in feminist film theory, including Gledhill, Mulvey, Silverman, Modleski, Doane, and Studlar. A section on avant-garde theory will include Vertov, Epstein, Deren, Brakhage, Sitney, and Michelson. These topic areas will be set in interaction throughout: e.g., Soviet editing and antirealism are continued in the avant-garde; rhetorical figures such as metaphor, metonymy, ellipsis, condensation, and displacement, can be traced in very different theoretical contexts and in close readings of individual films. Fulfills Advanced Analysis or Media Study Elective.

DMS 411 FILM THEORY
Shilina-Conte :: M/W 11-12:50 :: CFA 232
REG# 23000

This course will guide you through the maze of “pre-” and “post-,” “-isms” and “-ships” in film studies, including the theories of authorship and spectatorship, realism, formalism, cognitive criticism, semiotics, psychoanalysis, post-structuralism, feminism and post-feminist studies, as well as the theory of the senses. The assigned readings will include excerpts and articles by Bazin, Eisenstein, Vertov, Baudry, Metz, Balasz, Gunning, Arnheim, Mulvey, Bordwell, Deleuze, Marks, Sobchack, and Naficy, among others. Following Thomas Elsaesser’s enticing approach and focusing on the role of the spectator in cinema, we will
study classical and contemporary film theories through the interaction between Moving Image, Senses, Body and Mind as well as such metaphors of filmic experience as Window and Frame, Door and Screen, Mirror and Face. Watching such films as Persona by Bergman, Onibaba by Shindo, Woman in the Dunes by Tashigahara, Stalker by Tarkovsky, The Scent of Green Papaya by Anh Hung Tran, The Hand by Wong Kar Wai and animations by Jan Svankmajer, we will interpret not only the ways we “see” and “hear” films, but also explore them through our senses
of touch, smell and even taste. In addition, we will talk about puzzle films, mind-game films (Elsaesser), and forking path films (Bordwell), embracing Gilles Deleuze’s statement of “the brain as the screen”. As Elsaesser points out, “film and spectator are like parasite and host, each occupying the other and being in turn occupied.” This unique approach of confrontation and conflation with the screen through our mind, body and senses will open for us new modes of knowing and representing the world through film and media.

DMS 415 WEARABLE MEDIA
E. Conrad :: Friday 11:00am – 2:40pm :: CFA 246
Reg# 23977

This production course explores the expressive potential of soft circuitry and wearable media. We will explore the materials and construction techniques of “soft computing” (conductive fabrics, yarns, etc.) to create expressive objects and interactive fashions. Technologies are not merely exterior aids, but interior changes of consciousness. They affect how we understand ourselves by co-structuring possibilities of thought. The focus of this course will be the interaction and interrelationship between soft technologies and bodies. There are no prerequisites – introductory electronics and sewing techniques will be reviewed. $100 Lab Fee.

DMS 416 ADVANCED VIDEO PRODUCTION: RE-MAKES: EXPERIMENTS IN REPETITION AND DIFFERENCE
Sarlin :: T/TH 11-12:50 :: CFA 232
Reg# 24540

From Hollywood blockbusters to the re-packaging of old films in new formats, practices of re-making have been crucial to the history of moving images since the first cinematic experiments with found footage in the 1920s. This course will focus on processes of revision and reinterpretation as we explore the variety of ways in which repetition can be used to create difference. Beginning with found footage exercises, students will complete three short assignments and a longer final project over the course of the semester. Students will be encouraged to experiment with narrative and non-narrative material. Special attention will be given to the ways in which presenting the same material in different formats provides an opportunity to address different audiences. Students who are interested in re-working previous pieces are encouraged to take this course as we will think about how remaking provides a model for critical practice.
Open to Graduate Students and advanced undergraduates by permission of the instructor.

DMS 423 (LECTURE/LAB) PROGRAMMING GRAPHICS
Pape, D E :: M/W 9-10:50 :: CFA 242
REG# 14106

Pape :: Lab M/W 9-10:50 :: CFA 242
REG# 21677

Permission of Instructor required. Lab fee $100. Contact: dave.pape@acm.org Fulfills Intermediate Production

DMS 448 GAME STUDIES COLLOQUIUM
Anstey :: TR 1:00 PM – 2:50 PM :: CFA 235
REG#23971

The goal of this advanced theory course is to provide you with analytical tools and a background in readings to address the history, design, cultures, and theory of games and gaming. Taking games as a broad category describing a variety of design, production, and play practices, we will examine analog games, digital and computer games, as well as other, more experimental forms, through lenses varying from art history to economics to philosophy to computer science. This course will provide a strong foundation for students interested in the history of games, game design for artists, play as activism, and contemporary media cultures.
Students will engage in independent research and develop their own ideas around games and gaming. We will provide you with support – both theoretical and technical – to expand your research, writing, and rhetorical skills. The broad base of topics we will address will guarantee that you will find something that piques your interest.

DMS 451 AVANT- GARDE CINEMA
Shilina-Conte :: M/W 1:00-2:50 p.m. :: 232 CFA
Reg# 24489

The recent exhibition Wish You Were Here at the Albright-Knox Art Gallery provided yet another reminder of the celebrated history of the Department of Media Study at Buffalo, represented by the likes of Paul Sharits, Hollis Frampton, Tony Conrad, and Steina and Woody Vasulka. In this class we will place these and many other names in the colorful tapestry of avant-garde and experimental cinema development. Topics for discussion will range from pure and surrealist cinema, abstract film and absolute film, structural film and flickers, paracinema and cameraless films to haptic imagery, synesthesia and liquid perception. Any education in film and media studies would be incomplete without engaging these essential and provocative fields of artistic inquiry. Works by Hans Richter, Walter Ruttmann, Oskar Fischinger, Germaine Dulac, Dimitri Kirsanoff, Maya Deren, George Landow, Ken Jacobs, Stan Brakhage, Su Friedrich, Peter Greenaway, Jean-Luc Godard, Jan Svankmajer, Bill Viola and Ron Fricke will be considered. This course fulfills the Advanced Analysis, Media and Culture orMedia Study electives.

DMS 455 SOCIAL WEB MEDIA
Clark :: T R , 6:00 PM – 7:50 PM :: CFA 244
Reg#20667

What does social media look like after the recent world events? How will the advent of Google+ and emerging social media change the landscape of the social web? What comes after social media? How will you use it? What will you create? This class combines analysis of web media in terms of participation and community formation with practical skills needed to shape the future of social media. We will examine social networking sites, blogging, peer-to-peer networks, reputation economies, mobile communication technologies, activism, and surveillance while developing a critical framework for discussing the state of networked culture. We will also gain a practical understanding of New Media through the use and creation of our own social web tools.

DMS 463 INTERACTIVE FICTION
Anstey :: M/W 11-12:50 :: CFA 235
REG#22661

Interactive stories set in immersive 3D virtual worlds are a staple of science fiction. Devices that allow people to inhabit personalized stories and interact with computer characters are described in Neuromancer, Star Trek, and Ray Bradbury’s short story, The Vveldt. In the 1980s and 1990s industry insiders believed that a marriage between video games and Hollywood movies was imminent. Meanwhile, writers were excited by the non-linear and interactive potential of hypertext, but killer interactive fiction has not emerged. This course will examine interactive narrative in theory and practice. We will look at the reasons why interactive fiction is so difficult to create and study. Encourages students to create their own interactive fiction.

DMS 496 (1- 4 CR VARIABLE) MEDIA ARTS INTERNSHIP
Staff
REG# Permission of Instructor

Media Study majors have the opportunity to gain variable academic credit for internships in local and national media production companies, television stations, cable companies, and media access centers. This is an unpaid internship available to majors. Guidelines are set by an internship supervisor in collaboration with a faculty sponsor to provide hands-on practical experience in an on-the-job training program. For registration information, see Luann Zak in 231 CFA. Media Study Elective.

DMS 499 (1-4 CR VARIABLE) INDEPENDENT STUDY
Staff
REG# Permission of Instructor
Students may arrange for special courses of study with faculty through “Independent Study.” The instructor will set the guidelines for the course on an individual basis. It permits the student to study, independently, in an area where no course is given. Syllabus for Independent Study should be prepared prior to semester, signed by the instructor, with one copy on file with the department. For registration information, see Luann Zak in 231 CFA. Lab fee for production work: $100 Media Study Elective.