Fall 2010

Undergraduate Course Descriptions (Archived)

DMS 101A BASIC FILM MAKING
Scime :: MW 9:00-10:50pm :: CFA 278
REG#195526

This course is intended to provide a basic introduction to 16mm film production. Classes will include screenings, lectures, and demonstrations. Students will learn basic camera operation, lighting, editing, and sound acquisition. In addition, the course will explore the critical relationship between theory and practice in the context of film production. Students will be required to complete collaborative class projects, individual assignments, and a critical paper. Each student will also be required to complete a short, non-sync, 16mm film project. Class materials will cost approx. $150. Lab fee: $100. Class size is strictly limited. Fulfills Basic Production Requirement.

 

DMS 103A BASIC VIDEO
Staff :: MW 3-4:50pm :: CFA 278
REG#155299

This course is a basic introduction to the tools and techniques of video production. Students will become familiar with using video and develop strategies for its application as an alternative medium of communication. Crucial to this project is the concurrent development of a critical perspective on mainstream media culture. Video art screenings and readings in media theory will critically address the relations between viewers, producers, and the media. Students must expect to acquire materials and texts costing approx. $50.00 to be used in exercises in classroom presentations. Access to equipment and editing facilities will be available. Lab fee: $100. Class size is strictly limited. Fulfills Basic Production Requirement.

 

DMS 103B BASIC VIDEO
Vo :: TR 9-10:50am :: CFA 235
REG#332670

This course is a basic introduction to the tools and techniques of video production. Students will become familiar with using video and develop strategies for its application as an alternative medium of communication. Crucial to this project is the concurrent development of a critical perspective on mainstream media culture. Video art screenings and readings in media theory will critically address the relations between viewers, producers, and the media. Students must expect to acquire materials and texts costing approx. $50.00 to be used in exercises in classroom presentations. Access to equipment and editing facilities will be available. Lab fee: $100. Class size is strictly limited. Fulfills Basic Production Requirement.

 

DMS 105A BASIC DOCUMENTARY
Demchenko :: MW 11:00am-12:50pm :: CFA 232
REG#343399

This course will present students with the fundamental, theoretical, creative, and technical concerns of documentary and video production. Students will be introduced to methods of research, production design, approach to subject, interviewing and the structuring of information, as well as the technical video skills of camera work, sound recording, and lighting and editing, as they apply specifically to the documentary process. The demands of documentary expression require preparation with a different emphasis from that which applies to the personal and experimental approaches to filmmaking and video making. Materials and texts will cost approx. $50. Lab fee: $100. Class size is strictly limited. Fulfills Basic Production Requirement.

 

DMS 105B BASIC DOCUMENTARY
Staff :: TR 11:00am-12:50pm :: CFA 278
REG#219661

This course will present students with the fundamental, theoretical, creative, and technical concerns of documentary and video production. Students will be introduced to methods of research, production design, approach to subject, interviewing and the structuring of information, as well as the technical video skills of camera work, sound recording, and lighting and editing, as they apply specifically to the documentary process. The demands of documentary expression require preparation with a different emphasis from that which applies to the personal and experimental approaches to filmmaking and video making. Materials and texts will cost approx. $50. Lab fee: $100. Class size is strictly limited. Fulfills Basic Production Requirement.

 

DMS 107 FILM HISTORY 1
Staff :: MW 11:00am – 12:50pm :: CFA 112
REG#048766

This course will introduce students to cinema from its technological and cultural origins in the late nineteenth century through the era of silent cinema, the development of sound film (“the talkie”) in the late 1920s, up to the end of WWII in 1945. This course will closely examine the technological innovations of cinema in the first half of the twentieth century and their effect on the development of narrative form and film style. We will further consider films in their socio-historical contexts in order to understand the dynamic relations among the early cinema’s technological, cultural, and aesthetic development. Since this course may also serve as an introduction to film interpretation, we will pay close attention to the construction of the moving image and the ideological implications behind that image. Fulfills Intro To Interpretation Requirement.

 

DMS 109 FILM INTERPRETATION
Staff :: MW 11:00am-12:50pm :: CFA 235
REG#108667

Film Aesthetics have had an enormous impact on the development of media, from television to the internet to video games, as well as on our personal experiences of our everyday lives: “I feel like I’m in a movie!” This course provides an introduction to the main concepts and themes that constitute the rapidly expanding field of Film Studies.  In this course, we will learn to recognize the techniques and conventions that structure our experience of cinema – narrative, mise-en-scene, cinematography, editing, sound, genre – in order to understand how these various components combine to yield an overall sense of film form. We will survey global film history, critically viewing examples of silent film, classical Hollywood, world cinema, experimental, documentary, and independent narrative film. We will also examine isolated clips from a variety of films as they relate to the weekly discussion topics. Fulfills Intro To Interpretation Requirement.

 

DMS 110 PROGRAMMING FOR DIGITAL ART
Pape :: M 9:00am – 10:50am Lecture :: CFA 112 / W Lab A 9:00am – 10:50am OR Lab B 11:00am – 12:50pm CFA 242
Registering for LAB automatically registers you in the Lecture
Reg #397360 Lab A
Reg #104925 Lab B

Beginner programming course geared towards Media Study majors with little to no experience who want to pursue Programming Graphics, Game Design and Virtual Reality. This course introduces basic concepts of Computer Science with the Python programming language, while incorporating a Media Study perspective.  Non Majors welcome if space available. Fulfills Basic Production Requirement.

 

DMS 121A BASIC DIGITAL ARTS
Staff :: MW 9-10:50am :: CFA 244
REG#201898

This course will present fundamental concepts and methods that underlie the use of computers in generating and processing digital works and examine them in the context of contemporary artistic practice in painting, photography, film, and video. The impact of computers, both present and potential, on the more traditional arts will be discussed. Through the use of imaging audio and presentation software, students will explore the various ways in which computers deal with images, sound and structures, adapting these methods to produce work of their own. Work by contemporary artists working in the digital medium will be shown and examined on a regular basis. The class size is strictly limited. Lab fee: $100. Fulfills Basic Production Requirement.

 

DMS 121B BASIC DIGITAL ARTS
Staff :: TR 1pm-2:50pm :: CFA 244
REG#112970

This course will present fundamental concepts and methods that underlie the use of computers in generating and processing digital works and examine them in the context of contemporary artistic practice in painting, photography, film, and video. The impact of computers, both present and potential, on the more traditional arts will be discussed. Through the use of imaging audio and presentation software, students will explore the various ways in which computers deal with images, sound and structures, adapting these methods to produce work of their own. Work by contemporary artists working in the digital medium will be shown and examined on a regular basis. The class size is strictly limited. Lab fee: $100. Fulfills Basic Production Requirement.

 

DMS 152 PORTFOLIO PREPARATION WORKSHOP
Staff :: Times and location TBA
Reg #TBA

 

DMS 155 INTRODUCTION TO NEW MEDIA
Staff :: TR 9:00am-10:50am :: CFA 244
REG# 057836

“Intro to New Media” is an introductory production course which focuses on the use, concepts, and production of digital media with a concentration on net-based digital content. We will look at emerging technologies and the the tools for authoring them. We will keep a solid base in principles of design and the history of the medium throughout this process. Topics will be discussed in lectures and looked at closely in lab sections. A number of short exercises in combination with larger projects will offer opportunites for students to develop technical as well as conceptual skills in new media production. The lab is equipped with the the latest software applications (such as Adobe Photoshop, Dreamweaver, Flash, as well as a number of open-source applications) which students will learn and make use of. The course will accommodate 48 students. Enroll now! Get the technological edge! Lab fee $100. Fulfills Basic Production Requirement.

 

DMS 193 INTRO TO JOURNALISM
Galarneau :: T 7:00pm – 9:40pm :: Clemens 6
Reg #148687

Please refer to the Department of English. This is a cross-listed course and is worth 3.0 credits.

 

DMS 213 IMMIGRATION & FILM
Staff :: TR 11:00am-12:50pm :: CFA 112
REG#016984

By looking at representative examples of American and foreign films, this course will critically examine the role of cinema in the construction and exploration of the figure of the racial, ethnic, cultural and social theory. Our topics will include (1) racial, ethnic and cultural identity and its reciprocal relationship with cinema, (2) the notion of realism in relation to the representation of race and ethnicity in film, (3) the cinematic representation of inter-ethnic and intra-ethnic conflict, (4) the position of cinema in the debate between assimilation and multiculturalism. Films will be screened in class and discussed against the background of focused critical readings. The aim of the course is to provide you with an opportunity to develop your critical thinking and writing abilities through class discussions, close readings of films and critical literature, and writing assignments. Fulfills the American Pluralism requirement or Media and Culture or Media Study Elective.

 

DMS 213 IMMIGRATION & FILM
Molina :: MW 1:00pm-2:50pm :: CFA 112
REG#484866

By looking at representative examples of American and foreign films, this course will critically examine the role of cinema in the construction and exploration of the figure of the racial, ethnic, cultural and social theory. Our topics will include (1) racial, ethnic and cultural identity and its reciprocal relationship with cinema, (2) the notion of realism in relation to the representation of race and ethnicity in film, (3) the cinematic representation of inter-ethnic and intra-ethnic conflict, (4) the position of cinema in the debate between assimilation and multiculturalism. Films will be screened in class and discussed against the background of focused critical readings. The aim of the course is to provide you with an opportunity to develop your critical thinking and writing abilities through class discussions, close readings of films and critical literature, and writing assignments. Fulfills the American Pluralism requirement or Media and Culture or Media Study Elective.

 

DMS 215 CREATIVE VIDEO WORKSHOP
Staff :: MW 1:00pm-2:50pm :: CFA 278
REG#030573

Prerequisites: DMS 103 or DMS 105 and Passing Portfolio Review.  This course is a workshop in the tools of video. It offers exercises in video production for students who have had some previous exposure to video as a creative medium. The course will emphasize the development of technical skills and knowledge which are necessary for the effective use of video as an artistic tool and for documentation or personal expression. The student will produce a series of project concerning cameras, lighting, editing, and other aspects of production and post-production. Using cross-culture material to create video work. Each student will need to spend a substantial amount of time working with studio, portable, and editing facilities outside the regular class hours. In addition, some outside videotape viewing, as well as short papers, will be required. Readings will include classroom handouts in addition to the assigned textbook. $100 lab fee. This course can count towards the “non- *” Intermediate Production course or as an elective.

 

DMS 231 3D MODELING
Baumgaertner :: M W 1pm – 2:50pm :: CFA 242
REG #197211

This course is designed to provide students with an understanding of how to make 3D models for “real time” programs like games and simulations. Students will utilize Autodesk Maya 2010 as well as Adobe Photoshop to make models and other assets from scratch for their own unique creations. The topics taught in this class include low polygon modeling, photography, texture creation, and material creation. Additional material may be taught on Mental Ray texture baking. Enrolling students should come to the first class with a sketch pad (unlined) which can be purchased at the student bookstore. $100 lab fee. Fulfills non “*” intermediate production requirement or can be used as an elective.

 

DMS 259 INTRO TO MEDIA ANALYSIS
Staff :: TR 9:00am-10:50am :: CFA 235
REG#350309

is introductory course to Media Analysis examines the rise of especially visual mass media in the 20 th century, from photography, television, and film, to new media. It pays close attention to media historical moments, such as fascism and film in post world war II Italy, or the postmodern turn with the event of digitality. Due to the urgency of political events, we will closely analyze the current media-war-coverage considering mainstream as well as independent media discourses. The respective media are analyzed in light of their materiality. Methodologies vary between Ideology-critique, Cultural Studies, Political Theory, Postmodern Theory, and Semiotics. Students will write essay exams based on course lectures and essays from the course reader. Fulfills Intro to Interpretation.

 

DMS 315 STEREOSCOPY
Pape :: Friday 10:00am – 1:40pm :: CFA 242
Reg #162107

This course explores the creation of stereoscopic (“3D”) imagery. 3D movies are making another comeback, with many recent, major releases. Although it is best known in mainstream Hollywood fare ranging from “Creature from the Black Lagoon” to “Avatar”, stereoscopy has also been employed by creators such as Norman McLaren, Salvador Dali, Robert Wilson, and many others. In this class we will study the history, technology, a nd aesthetics of 3D image-making in photography, film, painting, and computer graphics; more importantly, students will learn to create their own stereoscopic work. Projects will include both still and moving images, and can be live (photo/film/video) or digitally created. Prerequisite: any basic production class. This is an intermediate production class; $100 lab fee. Fulfills Intermediate Production Requirement as a non – “*” course. Can also be applied as an elective.

 

DMS 341 INTERMEDIATE VIDEO WORKSHOP
Parkins :: M W, 11:00am – 12:50pm :: CFA 278
REG#123075 Prereqs: DMS 103 or 105 and Portfolio.
Corequisite : DMS 422
In this course, students will explore and experiment with the video medium through a series of short exercises. Improvement of technical knowledge and skills will be emphasized, and creativity encouraged. Topics to be explored will include: video camera, advanced shooting techniques, sound gathering techniques, microphone placement and selection, non-linear sound editing, lighting techniques for studio and location, non-linear editing. Students learn properties of audio, video and still assets, and practice importing, logging, and insert assembly editing. They also develop a sensitivity to the unique aesthetic and usability criteria of digital video in application environments. Must take DMS 422 concurrently. Fulfills * Intermediate Production requirement.

 

DMS 400 FILM & CINEMATOGRAPHY WORKSHOP
Lee :: TR 1:00pm-2:50pm :: CFA 278
REG#309671  Prereqs: DMS 103 or 105 and Portfolio

This is an intermediate moving image production course designed for students who have successfully completed the basic level film production class and have produced at least one short 16mm film. This course will explore the key components of independent production. Students will develop a major project from pre-production through the initial stages of post-production. Students are required to come to the class with an initial concept for a substantive project to be completed during the spring semester. Students will maintain a journal, produce a pre-production package, produce a production book and a fine cut of their final film project. In Addition, students will make a short autobiographical film and explore Narrative, Documentary, and Experimental elements in filmmaking. Students can expect to spend $450 for materials and processing for the course. Students will receive some assistance with supplies and film stock. Fulfills “*” Intermediate Production.

 

DMS 404 ADVANCED DOCUMENTARY PRODUCTION
Elder :: TR 3:00pm-4:50pm :: CFA 235
REG#222611
Prereqs: DMS 341, Portfolio
This course is an advanced workshop in which students create an original documentary project in video (or film, still photography, audio or web-based formats with the permission of instructor). Creativity and originality will be stressed with exercises to encourage “seeing”, “listening” and artistic risk taking. Individual projects may go in many creative directions including the political, personal, humorous, experimental, conventional, transgressive, ethnographic, client-based or activist. Students will gain a solid understanding of contemporary non-fiction forms and the particular problems which non-fiction makers face. Films by contemporary artists will be shown on a regular basis with special attention to experimental documentary work. We will look at dramatic structure, story telling, and narrative/non-narrative forms of editing. Emphasis will be given to production techniques which bring access and intimacy to the video subject and integrity to the documentary. The course will explore ethical issues and problems of privacy and intrusion. Students will develop production skills in research, fieldwork, collaboration, interviewing, location sound recording, camera skills, and production management. Each student will produce one short documentary piece, with supporting assignments in shooting, sound, and digital editing on the Media 100. A written production book will be required. A class film festival ends the semester. Prerequisite: DMS Basic Documentary, or DMS Basic Video and DMS Intermediate Video. Lab fee: $100. Attendance is mandatory. Fulfills Advanced Production.

 

DMS 409 NON-FICTION FILM
Elder :: TR 11:00am-12:50pm :: CFA 235
REG#162254

This course is an exploration of the principal theories of film through a critical reading of texts and a close examination of films. The texts to be perused comprise several groups. Classical film theory includes Munsterburg, Kuleshov, Pudovkin, Eisenstein, Balasz, Arnheim, Bazin, and Godard. The critique of classical film theory includes Burch, Perkins, and Henderson. The course will also explore semiotics, psychoanalysis, and poststructuralism, in Barthes, Eco, Metz , Pasolini, Baudry, Heath, and in feminist film theory, including Gledhill, Mulvey, Silverman, Modleski, Doane, and Studlar. A section on avant-garde theory will include Vertov, Epstein, Deren, Brakhage, Sitney, and Michelson. These topic areas will be set in interaction throughout: e.g., Soviet editing and antirealism are continued in the avant-garde; rhetorical figures such as metaphor, metonymy, ellipsis, condensation, and displacement, can be traced in very different theoretical contexts and in close readings of individual films. Fulfills Advanced Analysis or Media Study Elective.

 

DMS 412 THEORY OF FILM NARRATIVE
Henderson :: MW 9:00am-10:50am :: CFA 235
REG#195297

What defines the future of the Internet? The strategic tag cloud of tomorrow includes terms like The Internet of Things, RFID, Web2.0, Grid Computing, LambdaRail, Internet2 and many others. Social Web Media maps online group formation and emerging computing technologies that amplify cooperation and distributed creativity. While most of the theory in this field is dominated by entrepreneurial management rhetoric, we will focus on independent social web media in the cultural sector. What is worth defending about the current end-2-end Internet? The middle-class household Internet of the developed world enables a culture of sharing in the unregulated commons, free culture (i.e. file sharing, open source culture), cultures of participation and generosity (i.e. citizen journalism, open archives, open journals, knowledge repositories), and network culture (i.e. the ability for self-organized social networks to form). Today, more often than not we are users *and* producers online. Fulfills Advanced Analysis or Media Study Elective.

 

DMS 415 SOCIAL WEB MEDIA
Larsen :: TR 1pm – 2:50pm :: CFA 112
Reg #251763

What defines the future of the Internet? The strategic tag cloud of tomorrow includes terms like The Internet of Things, RFID, Web2.0, Grid Computing, LambdaRail, Internet2 and many others. Social Web Media maps online group formation and emerging computing technologies that amplify cooperation and distributed creativity. While most of the theory in this field is dominated by entrepreneurial management rhetoric, we will focus on independent social web media in the cultural sector. What is worth defending about the current end-2-end Internet? The middle-class household Internet of the developed world enables a culture of sharing in the unregulated commons, free culture (i.e. file sharing, open source culture), cultures of participation and generosity (i.e. citizen journalism, open archives, open journals, knowledge repositories), and network culture (i.e. the ability for self-organized social networks to form). Today, more often than not we are users *and* producers online. Fulfills Advanced Analysis or New Media or Media Study Elective.

 

DMS 417 FILMIC TEXT
Henderson :: MW 1:00pm-2:50pm :: CFA 235
REG#340090

This course is concerned with the diverse roles that theory has played in various close readings of film. Those theories usually organize the energies of the text. Tracing this process is another goal of the course. Approaches that contextualize a film contrast with other, shorter approaches. We will look at select shorter articles that are excellent at what they do. There will be a close analysis of the 1970 “Collective Text by the Editors of Cahiers Du Cinema: John Ford’s Young Mr. Lincon (1939).” It may not be too much to say that this reading launched perhaps a dozen and a half of other readings. These include Charles Eckert’s reading of Marked Woman, Stephen Heath’s reading of Touch of Evil, Virginia Wright Wexman’s reading of Vertigo, Brian Henderson’s reading of The Searchers, Esther C.M. Yau on Yellow Earth, and David Ehrenstein’s reading of Desert Fury. This course is an Advanced Analysis course or can also be used as an Elective. Fulfills Advanced Analysis or Media Study Elective.

 

DMS 419 INT DIGITAL ARTS PRODUCTION
Conrad, E. :: TR, 3pm – 4:50pm :: CFA 244
Reg#196323

The conceptual and practical production of digital art, primarily focusing on the manipulation and generation of moving images and sounds from within a computer environment. Fulfills * Intermediate Production.

 

DMS 422 VIDEO ANALYSIS
Conrad, T. :: Lecture – T 7:00pm – 8:50pm CFA 112 / Lab – R 5pm – 6:50pm CFA 235
Reg#153899

Professor Tony Conrad:
“I have a collection of about 600 contemporary video works by artists, more than anybody would be able to watch. Some of these are also viewable online, many are not. I am organizing Tuesday evening screenings for Video Analysis (and for students in the Graduate Video Analysis Seminar DMS 422). Then — on Thursday evenings — we will have a general discussion of the work, and of related topics of media arts interest.”
“On several Thursdays I will communicate with the Thursday class via skype, accompanied by ‘visiting’ artists in New York, London, Texas, and Canada. There will be plenty of review of the in-class screenings possible, by watching related work online. I will make tons of articles and other readings available online too, so you will be able to follow up your interests. However, the assignments will be simple: journal entries on videos screened or seen, with accompanying citations from online sources.”
“I have structured this course specifically to provide you with access to the most contemporary media arts information that is available to me — but that is almost completely inaccessible otherwise in Buffalo — and then by providing a forum for discussion and developing our own ideas.”
No lab fee. Attendance is mandatory. Fulfills Advanced Analysis.

 

 

DMS 425 VISUAL MEDIA POETICS
Glazier :: MW, 3:00 PM – 4:50 PM :: CFA 232
Reg#196323

Visual Media Poetics provides the opportunity to explore the expressive potential of language as a creative material existing on alphabetic, visual, and aural levels, with a focus on visual forms of cultural expression. Visual anthropology will provide a significant lens through which to view visual media and its impact on the cultural milieu. We will take multiple approaches to visual expression, including cultural studies, visual theories, the photographic image, the virtual, representations of the cultural/historic “other”, and sexual/embodied practices, among others. The immense value of 20th century experimental literature and innovative film to he student’s own efforts to design or interpret media writing is an additional concern of this course. We will be thinking about the varied possibilities of language as a conjunction of textures, tones, meanings, and media. We will look at media “literature” as a merging of form, image, language, and sound, and we will explore works that successfully produce this extraordinary effect. We will look at works of Concrete and digital poetry and consider these as models for digital media design. We will study theoretical essays and manifestos related to visual media practice, investigating modes and means of visual media expression, as seen through a number of documentary and narrative films. Course requirements: Weekly readings, an oral presentation, a final project, exams, and quizzes as necessary. Attendance is crucial. For Media Study majors, this course fulfills advanced analysis or Media Study elective. Fulfills Advanced Analysis or Media Study Elective.

 

DMS 438 VIRTUAL WORLDS I (FORMERLY VR ART PROJECT)
Anstey :: TR 11:00am – 12:50pm :: CFA 242
Reg# 190032

Increasingly we live, play, and work in virtual worlds created by computer graphics, 3D models, scripts and programs; places inhabited by networked people and autonomous computer characters. These worlds have taken on a gendered significance – massively multiplayer online games seem to be male space; virtual places like Second Life seem more inviting to women and to promote social communities. Despite female pioneers like Brenda Laurel and Char Davies the creation of virtual worlds has also become male dominated. People of every gender are encouraged to take this production course, where the creative process will be seeded by a study of virtual, augmented, and mixed reality worlds built by artists, activists, game-designers, trainers, humanists, educators, and scientists.

The production of virtual worlds breaks down into two rough categories: world implementation and asset creation. This hands on production course focuses on world implementation. Using contemporary software (new virtual reality tools and game engines are constantly arriving) we investigate the techniques and problems of building virtual environments, dealing with issues in spatial, aesthetic, interactive and conceptual design. It is useful but not essential to have a background in scripting, programming and asset production (sounds, images, textures, models). Fulfills Intermediate “*” Production Requirement.

 

 

DMS 485 MEDIA ROBOTICS I
Shepard :: R 9:00am – 12:40pm :: CFA 246
Reg# 136138 – please contact instructor for permission

This course is dedicated to understanding data and data acquisition in the context of digital media arts. Reliably acquiring and interpreting data from external devices is an important part of building non-trivial behaving artifacts. This course will allow students to better understand both the concepts as well as the techniques underlying a variety of data acquisition methods. The course will expose students to fundamental ideas behind sensing, sensor design and sensor interfaces. A substantial part of the course is dedicated to machine vision, an area of active research in both the engineering sciences as well as the arts. Course materials include readings in perception theory, sensor design, fundamentals of machine vision as well as documentation of select art works that engage in advanced sensing methods. Our lab has a wide array of sensor types, an industry grade commercial machine vision library as well as an open source research grade vision library, small footprint microprocessor based ccd cameras, ieee1394 compliant digital cameras, analogue video cameras with fast frame grabber cards and an open source C++ programming environment. With this infrastructure and instructor guidance, students will be able to explore all aspects of data collection. Fulfills Intermediate “*” Production Requirement.

 

DMS 496 (1- 4 CR VARIABLE) MEDIA ARTS INTERNSHIP
Staff
REG#Permission of Instructor

Media Study majors have the opportunity to gain variable academic credit for internships in local and national media production companies, television stations, cable companies, and media access centers. This is an unpaid internship available to majors. Guidelines are set by an internship supervisor in collaboration with a faculty sponsor to provide hands-on practical experience in an on-the-job training program. For registration info, see Nancy King in 231 CFA. Media Study Elective.

 

DMS 499 (1-4 CR VARIABLE) INDEPENDENT STUDY
Staff
REG#Permission of Instructor

Students may arrange for special courses of study with faculty through “Independent Study.” The instructor will set the guidelines for the course on an individual basis. It permits the student to study, independently, in an area where no course is given. Syllabus for Independent Study should be prepared prior to semester, signed by the instructor, with one copy on file with the department. For registration info, see Nancy King in 231 CFA. Lab fee for production work: $100 Media Study Elective.