Spring 2014

DMS 503 ADVANCED VIDEO PRODUCTION
Braemer :: T/Th 9:00AM – 10:50AM :: cfa235
Reg#23489

This course will be a production-intensive class focusing on completion of a longer project. We will study and create individualized distribution strategies for video work, screen and discuss a variety of documentary, fiction and experimental work, and, in addition to the longer project, work on a series of short video-sketches as a collective class project.

DMS 510 ADVANCED DOCUMENTARY
Mistretta :: T/TH 1:00PM – 2:50PM :: CFA 235
Reg #24094 Grad

This course is an advanced workshop in which students create an original documentary project in video (or film, still photography, audio or web-based formats with the permission of instructor). Creativity and originality will be stressed with exercises to encourage “seeing”, “listening” and artistic risk taking. Individual projects may go in many creative directions including the political, personal, humorous, experimental, conventional, transgressive, ethnographic, client-based or activist. Students will gain a solid understanding of contemporary non-fiction forms and the particular problems which non-fiction makers face. Films by contemporary artists will be shown on a regular basis with special attention to experimental documentary work. We will look at dramatic structure, story telling, and narrative/non-narrative forms of editing. Emphasis will be given to production techniques which bring access and intimacy to the video subject and integrity to the documentary. The course will explore ethical issues and problems of privacy and intrusion. Students will develop production skills in research, fieldwork, collaboration, interviewing, location sound recording, camera skills, and production management. Each student will produce one short documentary piece, with supporting assignments in shooting, sound, and digital editing on the Media 100. A written production book will be required. A class film festival ends the semester. Prerequisite: DMS Basic Documentary, or DMS Basic Video and DMS Intermediate Video. Lab fee: $100. Attendance is mandatory. Fulfills Advanced Production..

DMS 513 THE FILMIC TEXT: COLOR AND THE MOVING IMAGE

Shilina-Conte :: Th 4:00PM – 7:40PM :: CFA 112
REG#23476

A feast for the eyes, this class will take you on an “over the rainbow tour” of color history and effects in cinema. “There never was a silent film,” Irving Thalberg famously declared, and just as with sound, color has accompanied cinema since its inception. Early filmmakers employed applied processes such as hand-painting, stenciling, tinting and toning, long before the advent of such photographic systems as Technicolor and Eastmancolor. After a brief overview of the history of cinematic color, we will concentrate on its expressive and affective use as a means of evoking atmosphere, establishing mood and conveying implicit messages. We will examine color palettes of various directors, comparing Tom Tykwer’s saturated and succulent reds and yellows with Andrey Tarkovsky’s subdued and subtle greens and browns. We will also discuss the concept of synesthesia and color’s ability to create cross-communication among the senses through visual outbursts of emotion. The discourse of color has become a widely addressed topic in the post-cinematic age, as it raises questions of the preservation and restoration of moving images, changing notions of archiving, and the introduction of new digital effects. Films and excerpts will include a number of early shorts, The Adventures of Prince Achmed, Flowers and Trees, Becky Sharp, Ivan the Terrible, The Red Balloon, Kwaidan, Shadows of Forgotten Ancestors, Trois Couleurs, Cyclo, 20 Fingers, and The Fall, among others.

DMS 515 COMPUTATIONAL MEDIA: INTERFACING COMPLEXITY
Bohlen :: M2-5:40pm :: cfa246
Reg#23485

New washing machines have become too complicated to operate without a manual while some automobiles alert drivers of problems of unknown severity with a single blinking ‘engine light’, a new source of 21st century anxiety. Such experiences are the result of not only poor design, but of inadequate mapping of complex events.
This seminar / lab will investigate how experiential interfaces (visual, audio, haptic), and the software that controls them, interact with complex systems ‘underneath’. Interfaces to complex systems depend on how a problem is conceptually modeled, how it is abstracted into a technical artifact, how adaptable it is to varying contexts, and how it is communicated to people. The course will investigate the mapping of complexity form source to interface and consider technical, as well as social and cultural contexts in the process. Students will be asked to identify a terrible design ‘solution’ and present research artifacts that recast the problem and propose an alternate design approach as a semester project.
Open to graduate students and advanced undergrads by consent of instructor.

DMS 516 THEORIES OF MONTAGE AND REPRESENTATION
Shilina-Conte :: T 4- 7:40pm :: CFA 235
Reg#23487

This class will be structured as a comprehensive overview of the theory and practice of montage and representation in global media. Topics for discussion will include staging-in-depth (Bordwell), the Soviet montage school (Eisenstein, Kuleshov, Pudovkin, Vertov), American continuity style, rational and irrational/serial montage (Deleuze), spatiotemporal montage and montage-within-the-shot (Manovich), cinemetrics (Tsivian), QuickTime movies and “memory boxes” (Sobchack), etc. We will trace technological developments in film and digital media that permitted a shift from single frame shots (sequence) to multiple frames, windows and screens (multiplicity). Our special agenda in this class will be to focus on monochrome frames as points of rupture, where they are seen as simultaneously alien and integral to the field of the image. In these cases the cut often functions as both a “scar,” the visible evidence of a filmic cutting/psychic wounding, and a “threshold,” the invisible passage between suppressed history and troubling memory. From these reservoirs of invisible evidence in cinema swarm forth a host of critical issues such as ethnicity, race, sexuality, gender, ethics, trauma and censorship. The topics discussed in this class will help us to understand the connection between cinematic form and content and place mediated representations into social, cultural and historical contexts. Films and excerpts by Sergey Eisenstein, Dziga Vertov, Abel Gance, Jean-Luc Godard, Alain Resnais, Peter Greenaway, Chris Marker, Jim Jarmusch, Derek Jarman, Mania Akbari, Su Friedrich, Marlon Riggs, Alexander Sokurov and Carolee Schneeman will be considered. This class would be indispensable both for students interested in learning how to interpret film and media critically, as well as students who wish to become better editors/makers of their own films/media.

DMS 517 ADVANCED VIDEO WITH TONY CONRAD
Conrad :: W 5:00PM – 8:40PM ::  Cfa 286
REG#15368

“My personal work feels like an oil slick on this flowing current, spreading in two or three directions at once”- Tony Conrad
This is an advanced production course with Professor Tony Conrad. Tony has been doing research tracing the “science and technology” history of music all the way back into the 17th century, while also working with Tony Oursler on his Influence Machine project, which addresses the twinning of communications and spiritualism in the nineteenth century. He has been a constant and dedicated contributor to the media community here in Western NY—whether through our regional media centers, or public access cable TV, or the galleries and museum here. Much of his artistic production (and visibility) in recent years has been in audio performance or installation, often with a strong visual complement.

DMS 518 PLASMA
Teri Rueb, Tony Conrad, Paige Sarlin :: M 6:30 pm – 8:30 pm :: cfa112
Reg# 24324

Performances, Lectures, and Screenings in Media Art (PLASMA) is a course in which students are exposed to contemporary practices and discourses in media art and culture. Beyond the model of a lecture series course, PLASMA engages students in performative, field-based and workshop encounters with professional practitioners operating at national and international levels of visibility. Every other week brings a guest to the course, with alternating weeks providing an opportunity for critical reflection and discussion. Readings are assigned to complement topics addressed in the work of guest practitioners, including publications of their own, where relevant.
The course is part of the undergraduate foundations sequence in Media Study, but is also open to graduate students who meet in a graduate only section for the alternating weeks that are designated for critical reflection and discussion.

DMS 526 PHD SEMINAR II
Roussel :: T 5-8pm :: cfa235
Reg#23496

DMS 528 SOCIAL WEB MEDIA
Clark :: M/W 1:00PM – 2:50PM :: CFA 235
REG#20586

What does social media look like after the recent world events? How will the advent of Google+ and emerging social media change the landscape of the social web? What comes after social media? How will you use it? What will you create? This class combines analysis of web media in terms of participation and community formation with practical skills needed to shape the future of social media. We will examine social networking sites, blogging, peer-to-peer networks, reputation economies, mobile communication technologies, activism, and surveillance while developing a critical framework for discussing the state of networked culture. We will also gain a practical understanding of New Media through the use and creation of our own social web tools.

DMS 531 GRADUATE SEMINAR II
Sarlin :: M 3:00PM – 6:00PM :: CFA 235
Reg#15831

In this course we will strive for a self-reflective, creative
setting that allows for critique and well-informed debate of your
work. We will investigate media art with both, the due euphoria and
the necessary critical perspective. The course will emphasize the
professional presentation of work for each respective genre. We will
focus on framing your artistic vision and your critical discourse,
articulated through writing projects and iterative critique. As
preparatory to your thesis work and your continuing practice in the
field, the course culminates in the second year exhibition.
Lab fee $100

DMS 535 SCRIPTWRITING: ALL MEDIA
Anstey :: M/W 11am -12:50pm :: cfa242
Reg#20589

In this production workshop students will concentrate on writing and editing text/script elements for their media projects. The course will explore both traditional and experimental methods for generating and structuring text for all kinds of media project (games, film, installation, data-base, video, animation, performance, interactive-story). The media project can be fictional or documentary. Texts may include original writing, interview material, collaged or found fragments, to be performed, heard or displayed in the final piece. The texts may be linear, non-linear, interactive, poetic … This opportunity to focus on the text is for students at any stage of a project (conception through finishing) and those working with English as a second language or with translated material.

DMS 538 NEW MEDIA II
Clark :: M/W  11:00AM – 12:50PM :: CFA 244
Reg# Lecture-10112 Lab-22426
Lab fee $100.

New Media II addresses the practice and cultural questions surrounding the production of new media. This course introduces more advanced practices of web design (ActionScript, JQuery, Search Engine Optimization) as well as newly developed content management systems (Joomla). This course compels students to develop a critical framework for discussing the current state of networked culture and require students to actively participate on current social media platforms (including Facebook, Google+, Twitter, and blogs) in order to become more acquainted with the practices, theories, and histories related to new media. Students are expected to engage in and discuss class readings/projects concerning current issues of new media. Lab fee $100.
Not for MFA credit.

DMS 547 SOUND DESIGN
Bouquard :: M/W 1:00PM – 2:50PM :: cfa232
Reg#21751

The object of sound design is to explore issues and techniques in the area of sound design and digital audio production. The “visual” media –film and video- are powerfully inflected by their accompanying audio tracks, which frequently convey the work’s preponderant sensibility, or even its core meaning. This course will prepare students technically, conceptually and musically to work with audio. Lab fee $100.

DMS 555 METHODS OF MAKING III
Pape :: M/W 12:00PM – 1:50PM :: cfa242
Reg #23497

Programming for media art – programming and the web. PHP, Python, and/or Javascript. Databases. User-driven websites. Mashups. Twitter / Flickr / Facebook / Cosm / etc. A production course involving coding a variety of projects.  For students with basic, intermediate, or no coding experience; this course can be taken in addition to or in place of Methods of Making II.Lab fee $100.

DMS 562 GAME DESIGN
Pape :: M/W 9:00AM – 10:50AM :: cfa242
Reg#24086

Production course on the design of games, both computer-based and analog.Games are considered as a new art form and in order to create compelling games, students must be aware of the particularities of the form in both structural and aesthetic terms. Clearly the most important difference between games and other art forms are the interactive and interpersonal dynamics of gaming. Core isues of game design; what is a game? what is the nature of play? what makes for good game play? what are the core characteristics and structure of a game? and what are the roles of engagement, narrative, and interactivity in games? Encourages experimental thinking about the boundaries and possibilities of games. Students work in teams to produce a complete game. Thorough, hands-on grounding in the process of game design, including brainstorming, paper prototyping, play-testing, and iterative design. From conception to play-testing, and fosters the skills required to produce, examine, and critique games.
Lab fee $100.

DMS 598 PROJECT SUPERVISION (1 – 6 CR. VARIABLE)
Permission of Instructor

A student may enroll for this course after completing course requirements and while working on the thesis project. This course is for non-written projects only. One to six credits of the “project supervision” may be applied toward the MAH degree. Course syllabus form should be prepared prior to semester start and one copy should be on file in the Media Study office. Lab fee: $100. For registration information, see Ann Mangan in 231 CFA.

DMS 599 SUPERVISED TEACHING (4 CR. VARIABLE)
Permission of Instructor
See Ann Mangan in 231 CFA.

DMS 600 INDEPENDENT STUDY (1 – 8 CR. VARIABLE)
Permission of Instructor
A student may enroll for this course after completing course requirements and while working on the thesis project. This course is for non-written projects only. One to six credits of the “project supervision” may be applied toward the MAH degree. Course syllabus form should be prepared prior to semester start and one copy should be on file in the Media Study office. Lab fee: $100. For registration information, see Ann Mangan in 231 CFA.

DMS 603 GRADUATE MEDIA POETICS
Glazier :: T 3:00PM – 6:30PM :: cfa232
Reg#23498

Please Note: This course will be given in coordination with DMS 425 Visual Media Poetics. Course content may vary according to the number of students enrolled under each number. Your flexibility is appreciated!

This course offers new paths to reading as ways to invigorate your undertakings in writing and project-making. This seminar, with a distinct focus each semester, pursues the simple goal of invigorating your work as a graduate student in concert with individual objectives and goals. It aims to move you forward: stimulate your practice and writing projects and deepen your mindful participation in the field. This course can be considered as both theory and as production, where close reading is considered as creative and as intimate as production, and where writing/making is considered as self-reflective and as thoughtful as close reading. Importantly, receiving meaningful and constructive collective peer input by the seminar on your production projects and on your own writing is a priority. Such suggestions and reflections, as well as the ways of reading undertaken in this seminar, have been highly successful in past semesters.

This seminar will consist of two principle parts — reading and the project.
I. READING will focus on close reading of crucial texts to media poetics. In a normal semester, we read two texts side-by-side, with DIFFERENT TEXTS READ EACH SEMESTER, one that is an indispensable pearl of theoretic-thought-as-language masterpiece, and a second text that is either a foundational work in critical thinking, a work of literary thinking, a milestone in philosophy/science, or a work on emerging media (usually digital literatures) uniquely applicable to the seminar. My method is to read as closely as if you were writing the course text yourself. Thus, the goal is to both fine-tune reading habits as writing practice, reading in a direct and approachable manner, while discovering ways to freshen the strengths of your own techniques for the writing of your thesis.

II. PROJECT will largely consist of work on your own (creative or critical) with the group as a committed and engaged sounding board, with opportunities for earnest, thoughtful, and supportive input into the development of your ideas. This will include an early semester presentation of your project idea, a mid-semester feedback event, and a final presentation of the stage your project has moved to at the time. The project will not be work on during class time, except on indicated occasional days, and will rely on a system of group commentary and individual self-motivation for successful completion.
Other seminar activities include, when available, guest artists and theorists. I usually try to include such visits to help students connect with major figures in the “real world” of digital media. See their works in progress, provide opportunities to dialog, and open possibilities for emerging future professional relationships. Additionally, as possible, opportunities may exist for graduate student participation in the organization of arts and academic events hosted by the Electronic Poetry Center.

ENROLLMENT . This course is open to all graduate students. Undergraduate students who wish to undertake a focused seminar for their own purposes are asked to contact the professor for permission. For Media Study graduate students, this seminar will be undertaken in cognizance of your First Year Review, whether before or after you receive feedback from the faculty, and your general goals in the program. All interested students are warmly welcome to consider this course.

DMS 605 MEDIA ARCHITECTURE STUDIO: NETWORKED ECOLOGIES
Lab
Shepard :: T 1:30PM – 5:30PM :: South Campus TBA
REG#22204

This transdisciplinary studio will provide a critical context for experimental practice engaging contemporary networked ecologies. Addressing entanglements of human, natural and artificial systems, the studio will investigate how these assemblages can be influenced, shaped and mediated by a variety of media and material interventions. Emphasis will be placed on the role of distributed sensing and computation, big data and open systems, social media and other participatory platforms in aggregating small-scale, local interactions into larger organizations exhibiting network effects at urban and regional scales.

The studio consists of two linked courses: a seminar (DMS 611) structured as an open framework for critique and discussion of ongoing research and experimentation conducted by members of the studio, combined with a lab (DMS 605) providing focused instruction in the concepts, tools and techniques relevant to programming networked media environments. Joint registration for the seminar and lab is encouraged, but not required.

This studio is open to students from the departments of Media Study and Architecture at UB, together with students visiting from the Bauhaus-Universität Weimar, Germany within the framework of the new International Media Architecture Masters Studies (IMAMS) program. Additionally, the studio will participate in a week-long workshop as part of the international Media Architecture exchange (iMAE), a collaboration exploring the changing nature of learning at the university level through networked and distributed knowledge exchanges between the University at Buffalo, the Bauhaus Universitat Wiemar, and Plymouth University, UK.

DMS 606 BREAKING DOWN “BREAKING BAD”
Jackson :: M 12:30-3  ::  610 Clemens
REG#24306

“Breaking Bad” was one of the most spectacular narrative achievements in television. Its five seasons comprised some 60 hours of a single narrative arc, something no film or television program (cable or commercial) has ever accomplished. The original version of Erich von Stroheim’s Greed was a mere 8 hours; read aloud, The Iliad takes about 12 hours and War and Peace 24 hours “Breaking Bad” is one of the great epics. The acting, writing, cinematography, editing, scoring and settings were all masterful (the show won major awards in all categories). It was a story made for television (though it was shot on film), not the big screen; some of the work would have been handled differently had it been done for a theater audience. It has already had a continuing cultural influence: the New York City based One World Symphony, for example, is developing an opera based on the “Ozymandias” episode in the final season.

In this seminar, we’ll take a close look at all the components of the series; we’ll talk about what was done, how it was done, why it worked. There is one prerequisite: that members of the seminar have seen the series before the seminar’s first meeting. We’re going to be studying it, not greeting it. We’ll look at some segments during the semester, but only so we can deconstruct the work. I’ll expect participants to do class presentations on different aspects of the epic, and a term paper on a topic of their choice.

My own qualifications for, and interest in, the story of Walter White are threefold: I’ve made films, I’ve written extensively about narrative, and I was senior consultant on the field segment of the drug report for the President’s Commission on Law Enforcement and Administration of Justice (usually called “The President’s Crime Commission”), which gave me the opportunity to spend a lot of time on the ground with people on both sides of the kind of action depicted in “Breaking Bad.”

DMS 607 CRITICAL MEDIA PRACTICE
Rueb :: T 1:00PM – 4:00PM :: cfa244
Reg#24283

*3 Credit Course*
This course explores the potential of critical media practice to initiate and sustain public debate and dialogue around current issues, with the intent of leading to more informed positions from which broad publics may participate in policy and decision making. Working in the domain of critical design and media practice, students will collaborate on media projects that inspire, inform and motivate civic participation in debate and action through political process.

DMS 611 MEDIA ARCHITECTURE STUDIO: NETWORKED ECOLOGIES
Seminar
Shepard :: Th 1:30 – 4:30PM :: South Campus TBA
REG#20587

This transdisciplinary studio will provide a critical context for experimental practice engaging contemporary networked ecologies. Addressing entanglements of human, natural and artificial systems, the studio will investigate how these assemblages can be influenced, shaped and mediated by a variety of media and material interventions. Emphasis will be placed on the role of distributed sensing and computation, big data and open systems, social media and other participatory platforms in aggregating small-scale, local interactions into larger organizations exhibiting network effects at urban and regional scales.

The studio consists of two linked courses: a seminar (DMS 611) structured as an open framework for critique and discussion of ongoing research and experimentation conducted by members of the studio, combined with a lab (DMS 605) providing focused instruction in the concepts, tools and techniques relevant to programming networked media environments. Joint registration for the seminar and lab is encouraged, but not required.

This studio is open to students from the departments of Media Study and Architecture at UB, together with students visiting from the Bauhaus-Universität Weimar, Germany within the framework of the new International Media Architecture Masters Studies (IMAMS) program. Additionally, the studio will participate in a week-long workshop as part of the international Media Architecture exchange (iMAE), a collaboration exploring the changing nature of learning at the university level through networked and distributed knowledge exchanges between the University at Buffalo, the Bauhaus Universitat Wiemar, and Plymouth University, UK.

DMS 627 A-X SUPERVISED READING
Staff *** :: ARR, ARR – ARR
Reg.#000000

DMS 627 SUPERVISED READING (1 – 8 CR. VARIABLE)
Permission of Instructor

This course permits a student to do independent reading in an area where no course may be given. The instructor will set the guidelines for the course on an individual basis. Course syllabus form should be prepared prior to semester start and one copy should be on file in the Media Study office. For registration info, see Ann Mangan in 231 CFA.

DMS 690 MEDIA ARTS INTERNSHIP

DMS 691 CAP CAPSTONE INTERNSHIP
ARR :: ARR – ARR
Reg.#000000
Contact the Media Study Department for registration.

DMS 700 A – W THESIS GUIDANCE
Staff *** :: ARR, ARR-ARR :: CFA ARR
Reg.#000000
Contact the department for registration.

DMS 700 STA THESIS GUIDANCE
Staff *** :: Permission of Instructor :: ARR, ARR – ARR :: CFA ARR
Reg.#000000
A student may enroll in this course after completing course requirements and while writing the thesis. This course is for the written thesis only. One to six credits of  Thesis Guidance may be applied toward an MAH degree. Permission of the instructor is required. Course syllabus form should be completed before the semester s start, and one copy should be on file with the department. For registration info, see Ann Mangan in 231 CFA.