Fall 2016

• DMS 515 New Directions in Cinema
Waham, Sama :: MW 11am – 12:50pm :: CFA 286
REG# 24251

• DMS 532 Graduate Seminar 2
Rueb ::  W 5:00 – 7pm :: CFA 235
REG#14597
 
Note that regular attendance is mandatory. Lab fee is $125

• DMS 550 Methods Of Making II
Clark :: F 1 – 4:40pm :: CFA 244
REG#21225
This course introduces basic concepts and techniques for designing, constructing, and programming objects, spaces and media that sense and respond to their physical surroundings. Moving beyond the interface paradigm of screen, keyboard and mouse, physical computing enables alternate models for interaction with (and through) computers that afford more subtle and complex relations between a range of human and non-human actors. Combining readings, presentations and discussions on thetheory of computer enabled art forms with a series of hands-on technical workshops in computing methods and techniques, the course provides a critical context for emerging forms of experimental practice. Topics include fundamental ideas in computing (languages, representation of thought), embodied interaction (situated actions, responsive systems), practical aspects of hardware design (electricity, electronics, microprocessors, components, sensors and actuators), and functional programming (variables, datatypes, control structures, functions, objects, communication protocols). No prior expertise in computing required. Curiosity about how things work is a must.
Lab fee is $125

• DMS 555 Green Media

Anstey :: M/W 11:00AM – 12:50PM  :: CFA235
REG#23683
In this course we will investigate how media makers deal with environmental crisis; how environmental discourses use media; and the material connections between media and environment. The course interprets the word media broadly to include not only film, games, social media, mass media and media-art, but also big data, simulation, visualization, modeling, sensing (plus all and any hybrids and mutts). In terms of theory we will look at eco-media issues that unpack questions of the consciousness-raising power of film, media, and journalism;  Marxist and material perspectives that trace the physical impact of our media obsessions; biopolitical questions of human/non-human boundaries; and affect theory driven examinations of eco- optimism, pessimism, gaia-ism, nihilism as the anthropocene draws on.  Students are encouraged to respond to the material with media/art practice  and scholarly writing.
More Information at: http://josephineanstey.com/wp/?page_id=512

• DMS 562 Game Design

Pape, David :: MW 9am-10:50am :: CFA 242
REG#22679
Production course on the design of games, both computer-based and analog.Games are considered as a new art form and in order to create compelling games, students must be aware of the particularities of the form in both structural and aesthetic terms. Clearly the most important difference between games and other art forms are the interactive and interpersonal dynamics of gaming. Core isues of game design; what is a game? what is the nature of play? what makes for good game play? what are the core characteristics and structure of a game? and what are the roles of engagement, narrative, and interactivity in games? Encourages experimental thinking about the boundaries and possibilities of games. Students work in teams to produce a complete game. Thorough, hands-on grounding in the process of game design, including brainstorming, paper prototyping, play-testing, and iterative design. From conception to play-testing, and fosters the skills required to produce, examine, and critique games.
Lab fee $125.

• DMS 570 Media Theory

Roussel :: W 5 – 8:40pm  :: CFA235
REG#22682
What is media theory? This course aims to give an answer to this question by explicating different developments, questions and approaches to media theory, The course is focused on the close reading of important texts by important media theorists. The aim is to give an overview of different developments, questions and approaches to media theory that is at the same time grounded in your familiarity with specific works. 
Learning outcomes:
The students will have an understanding of different approaches to media theory and how these theories connect. The student will be able to locate her/his thesis or dissertation project in a sophisticated historical and theoretical context.

• DMS 598 PROJECT SUPERVISION (1 – 6 CR. VARIABLE)

Permission of Instructor
A student may enroll for this course after completing course requirements and while working on the thesis project. This course is for non-written projects only. One to six credits of the “project supervision” may be applied toward the MAH degree. Course syllabus form should be prepared prior to semester start and one copy should be on file in the Media Study office. Lab fee: $125. For registration information, see Ann Mangan in 231 CFA.
DMS 599 SUPERVISED TEACHING (4 CR. VARIABLE)
Permission of Instructor
See Ann Mangan in 231 CFA.
• DMS 600 INDEPENDENT STUDY (1 – 8 CR. VARIABLE)
Permission of Instructor
A student may enroll for this course after completing course requirements and while working on the thesis project. This course is for non-written projects only. One to six credits of the “project supervision” may be applied toward the MAH degree. Course syllabus form should be prepared prior to semester start and one copy should be on file in the Media Study office. Lab fee: $125. For registration information, see Ann Mangan in 231 CFA.

• DMS 602 Environmental Justice Issues

staff :: M W , 3:00 PM – 4:50 PM :: Cfa 286
Reg#23685
My choice to teach a seminar on environmental justice in Israel/Palestine—and not a seminar on security, terrorism, or borders in this region—is deliberate. Although rarely highlighted by the international media and seemingly marginal in comparison to the life and death stakes of many of the more typical issues the media reports on, environmental justice issues—those issues concerning land, water, air, forestation, wildlife, et cetera—are in fact central to the Israeli/Palestinian conflict. For example:
Whereas Israelis enjoy an unlimited supply of running water all year round, Palestinians are allotted a small fixed amount, resulting in constant water shortages. . . . Consequently, residents must deal with lengthy intervals in which they receive no water whatsoever (http://www.btselem.org/water, last updated 2014).
This seminar will study the legal and regulatory frameworks concerning environmental issues in Israel/Palestine. Specifically, we will discuss land regimes (urban planning, Jewish National Fund’s afforestation practices, Bedouin settlement in the Negev, Jewish Israeli settlement in the occupied Palestinian territories, olive trees), borders and the Separation Wall, the Dead Sea, hunting, nature reserves, and coral reef management in the Red Sea.

• DMS 603 Innovative Approaches to Moving Image & Video-Storytelling

staff :: MW 3-4:50 :: CFA286
REG#25012
An advanced production course which focuses on the learning, comprehension and creation of new unconventional narrative, fiction and non-fiction hybrid moving image. This hands-on studio course explores the meaning and methods of innovative film/video techniques, as utilized by contemporary artists working across a variety of genres. Through screening excerpts, in-class discussions, workshops, assignments and projects; students will master basic technical concerns in lighting, cinematography, sound and montage and will investigate a broad range of production and post-production techniques while exploring the practice and theories of films and filmmakers that challenge dominant commercial storytelling.

• DMS 606 Code and Space

Shepard :: TH 10am – 12:40pm :: TBA
Reg#25026
As software is woven into the spatial fabric of everyday life, new challenges and opportunities emerge for the design of the built environment. Over the past few decades, computer code has played an increasing role in the production and disposition of space. Code now generates, configures, modulates, conditions, governs, regulates, and activates a wide variety of spaces through which we move on a daily basis. At the same time, the decreasing cost of lower-power microcontrollers and wireless sensor networks, coupled with the proliferation of open source software and hardware initiatives, has brought the design and fabrication of objects, spaces and media that are responsive to their environments to ever-broader communities of architects, artists and designers. Taken together, these conditions present multiple vectors for critical inquiry into the material, formal, social and political dimensions of contemporary architectural practice.
This design research workshop investigates this interweaving of code and space within the built environment through project-based experimentation. It introduces basic concepts and techniques for creating objects, spaces and media that sense and respond to their physical surroundings and the actions and events that transpire there. We will investigate models for spatial interactions with (and through) computers that afford more subtle and complex relations between a range of human and non-human actors. Combining readings, presentations and discussions on the theory of responsive environments in architecture, art and design with a series of hands-on technical workshops in computing methods and techniques, the course provides a critical context for emerging forms of experimental architecture.
Topics include fundamental ideas in computing (languages, representations of thought and world), embodied interaction (situated actions, responsive systems), practical aspects of hardware design (electricity, electronics, microprocessors, components, sensors and actuators), functional programming (variables, data types, control structures, functions, objects) and basic networking principles (topologies, protocols). This is an introductory course. No prior expertise in computing required. Curiosity about how things work is a must.

DMS 627 A-X SUPERVISED READING
Staff *** :: ARR, ARR – ARR
Reg.#000000

• DMS 627 SUPERVISED READING (1 – 8 CR. VARIABLE)
Permission of Instructor
This course permits a student to do independent reading in an area where no course may be given. The instructor will set the guidelines for the course on an individual basis. Course syllabus form should be prepared prior to semester start and one copy should be on file in the Media Study office. For registration info, see Ann Mangan in 231 CFA.

• DMS 690 MEDIA ARTS INTERNSHIP

• DMS 691 CAP CAPSTONE INTERNSHIP
ARR :: ARR – ARR
Reg.#000000
Contact the Media Study Department for registration.

• DMS 700 A – W THESIS GUIDANCE
Staff *** :: ARR, ARR-ARR :: CFA ARR
Reg.#000000
Contact the department for registration.

• DMS 700 STA THESIS GUIDANCE
Staff *** :: Permission of Instructor :: ARR, ARR – ARR :: CFA ARR
Reg.#000000
A student may enroll in this course after completing course requirements and while writing the thesis. This course is for the written thesis only. One to six credits of  Thesis Guidance may be applied toward an MAH degree. Permission of the instructor is required. Course syllabus form should be completed before the semester s start, and one copy should be on file with the department. For registration info, see Ann Mangan in 231 CFA.