Fall 2014

Fall 2014

DMS 510 ADVANCED DOCUMENTARY: INTERVIEW WORK
Sarlin :: M/W 11am – 12:50pm :: CFA 286
Lec-Reg#24094
Lab Reg#22424

DMS 512 FILM AND MEDIA THEORY
Shilina-Conte :: T 5:00PM – 8:40PM :: CFA 112
REG#21746

This course will guide you through the maze of “pre-” and “post-,” “-isms” and “-ships” in film studies.  We’ll examine theories of realism, formalism, semiotics, psychoanalysis, feminism, structuralism, post-structuralism and cognitive criticism with a particular emphasis on the sensory dimension of the moving image.  Assigned readings for the course will include selections from the writings of Bazin, Eisenstein, Baudry, Metz, Balasz, Gunning, Arnheim, Mulvey, Bordwell, Deleuze, Marks, Sobchack and Shaviro, among others. Following Thomas Elsaesser’s approach to film theory through the senses, and focusing on the role of the spectator in cinema, we will study classical and contemporary film paradigms through the interaction between Moving Image and Senses, Body and Mind, emphasizing such metaphors of filmic experience as Window and Frame, Door and Screen, Mirror and Face. Watching such films as Peeping Tom by Powell, Repulsion by Polanski, Persona by Bergman, Stalker by Tarkovsky, The Hand by Wong Kar Wai, we will not only interpret the way we “see” and “hear” films but also explore them through our senses of touch, smell and even taste. As Elsaesser points out, “film and spectator are like parasite and host, each occupying the other and being in turn occupied.” This unique approach to the confrontation and conflation of mind and body with the screen will open for us new models for knowing and representing the world through film and media.

DMS 515 COMPUTATIONAL MEDIA
Bohlen :: W 1 – 4:40pm :: cfa246
Reg#22426

This two semester graduate seminar will introduce students to important aspects of the art and science of numerical computing. The goal of the seminar is twofold: One, to understand important principles of numerical representation and two, to explore the procedures and boundaries of numerical representation as a form of creative inquiry.
We will base our investigations on meteorological data sources and events. We will discuss climate, weather physics, sensor systems, transduction principles, data generation and software, data visualization, time series analysis, basic statistics, clustering techniques, correlation tests and other important data analysis methods. A prosumer weather station and open-source weather software will available for experimentation. We will ‘read’ and discuss environment ‘reporting’ of various kinds in numerically inclined new media as well as established media, including literature and film, in order to position the imaginary and disruptive potential of numerical data representations and manipulations.
This course will be designed and paced for graduate students without prior exposure to numerical methods and computing. Insights will be applicable to all kinds of data practices, including biological and social media with arge data sets. Beginners will be asked to sign up for the full two semester course sequence. Students taking this two semester version may opt for a creative semester project to combine studio/production with analytical skill training.
Open to graduate students and advanced undergrads by consent of instructor.

DMS 516 GLOBAL MEDIA AND CULTURE: THEORIES OF MONTAGE AND REPRESENTATION
Shilina-Conte :: Th 4- 7:40pm :: CFA 112
Reg#22115

This class will be structured as a comprehensive overview of the theory and practice of montage and representation in global film and media. Topics for discussion will include staging-in-depth (Bordwell), the Soviet montage school (Eisenstein, Kuleshov, Pudovkin, Vertov), American continuity style, rational and irrational/serial montage (Deleuze), spatiotemporal montage and montage-within-the-shot (Manovich), cinemetrics (Tsivian), QuickTime movies and “memory boxes” (Sobchack), etc. We will trace technological developments in film and digital media that permitted a shift from single frame shots (sequence) to multiple frames, windows and screens (multiplicity). Our special agenda in this class will be to focus on monochrome frames as points of rupture, where they are seen as simultaneously alien and integral to the field of the image. In these cases the cut often functions as both a “scar,” the sign of a filmic cutting/psychic wounding, and a “threshold,” the invisible passage between suppressed history and troubling memory. From these reservoirs of invisible evidence in cinema swarm forth a host of critical issues such as ethnicity, race, sexuality, gender, ethics, trauma and censorship. The topics discussed in this class will help us to understand the connection between cinematic form and content and place mediated representations into social, cultural and historical contexts. Films and excerpts by Sergey Eisenstein, Dziga Vertov, Abel Gance, Jean-Luc Godard, Alain Resnais, Peter Greenaway, Chris Marker, Derek Jarman, Mania Akbari, Su Friedrich and Marlon Riggs  will be considered. This class would be indispensable both for students interested in learning how to interpret film and media critically, as well as students who wish to become better editors/makers of their own films/media.

DMS 517 CONTEMPORARY CINEMA
Rousssel :: Tuesday 1-4:40 :: CFA 112
reg# 24362

DMS 517 ON THE ROAD: MEDIA GEOGRAPHIES
 Teri Rueb :: T 1 – 4:40pm :: 232
reg: 23940

The recent convergence of film, video, and sound as delivered via mobile media is explored in this field-based production course that literally takes place on the road.  Students and faculty travel together and work in small teams to create mobile media works that engage the interrelationship of media, movement, and geography as they learn about and experience the landscapes, histories, and cultures of Western New York.
The course begins with short exercises to introduce formal and technical skills and techniques spanning experimental, non-linear, documentary, narrative and non-narrative forms, especially as they relate to locative media and site-specificity.  Students then work individually or in collaboration to develop site-based works and itineraries that critically research and explore issues of place, culture and identity.  For Fall 2014 we will follow a trajectory that takes us to sites of in Western New York, with a special emphasis on “urban wilds” or disturbed landscapes and locations that have been reclaimed by spontaneous and opportunistic processes, both human and non-human.

Enrollment is open to graduate and undergraduate students.  Students will be responsible for their own travel expenses as they determine sites for their final projects.  Students should be prepared for field-based work in a variety of weather conditions.

Lab fee: $100

DMS 518 DIS/CONNECTIONS IN MEDIA CULTURE
Karppi :: M/W 1 – 2:50pm :: cfa235
Reg# 22427


Our life is penetrated by different digital networks and social media systems. We communicate via Facebook or Twitter. Our social life is being organized by these networks. They notify us about events, birthdays and even things we might want to buy. These systems have become so ubiquitous that we hardly notice their existence, except when they fail. Failures, breaks, disconnections make these connections visible in new ways.
This seminar will investigate different connections and disconnections in media. For example we will map the discourses around Web 2.0 and user participation and examine the ideological and economic principles of social media systems. We will look at things that challenge these user models such as dead Facebook users or online trolls. The course is focused on digital media specific material but not limited to it. In addition to reading assignments the students will do tasks and assignments where they analytically approach the themes of the lecture each week.
Students taking this course at 400-level will have an exam at the end of the course and students taking this course at 500-level will do a written essay.

DMS 526 PROGRAMMING GRAPHICS 1
Pape :: M/W 1 – 2:50pm:: cfa242
Reg#20010


This production course will introduce students to the concepts and practice of programming 3D computer graphics and audio using OpenGL and other libraries. The major focus will be on creating interactive art or games experiences by programming both graphics and sound. The course has three goals: to demystify computer code – we get behind the Graphic User Interface to the machine below; to explore the potential of programming – writing our own code means we can create customized computer tools as well as customized visuals; and to teach the fundamentals of graphics programming. Prerequisites are experience in a programming language such as Python, C, C++, or Java (DMS 121, CSE 113/4/5 or equivalent). Lab fee $100. Contact: dave.pape@acm.org

DMS 530 MEDIA THEORY
Karppi :: M 5 – 8:40pm :: CFA235
REG#22116

What is media theory?  This course aims to give an answer to this question by explicating different developments, questions and approaches to media theory as well as elaborating medium specific theory problems. The students will have a strong knowledge on different approaches to media theory and how these theories connect. In specific the student will have theoretical tools to understand three different areas of media theory: 1) general questions of media theory 2) the relation of subject, subjectivity and media and 3) new questions in media theory, especially related to computational media. 
This course is composed of lectures, reading assignments and different individual and collaborative explorations to media theory. The reading assignments are based on original texts from different media theoreticians.

DMS 531 GRADUATE SEMINAR I
Conrad :: W 5:00PM – 8:00PM :: CFA 232
Reg#19058
Lab Fee – $100


In this course we will strive for a self-reflective, creative
setting that allows for critique and well-informed debate of your
work. We will investigate media art with both, the due euphoria and
the necessary critical perspective. The course will emphasize the
professional presentation of work for each respective genre. We will
focus on framing your artistic vision and your critical discourse,
articulated through writing projects and iterative critique. As
preparatory to your thesis work and your continuing practice in the
field, the course culminates in the second year exhibition.

DMS 534 MOBILE APPS WITH HTML5 
Markert :: Th, 1:00 – 4:40 PM :: CFA244
REG#24275 
Lab Fee – $100


Did you ever wish to design an app for your iPhone? Or do you have an idea for the next awesome creative coding experience on the iPad? Do you have a new Android Tablet and want to make something cool with it? This is your chance!
We will work with the latest cross-platform HTML5 web technologies (mainly the ECMA scripting language, better known as JavaScript; including CSS3) to create applications that will run on your mobile device.
Participants should already know HTML and CSS; knowing at least one programming language (e.g. Processing) will be most helpful.
MobileMarkertFall2014 (.pdf)
Michael Markert is visiting from the Bauhaus University Weimar. Last year he taught a weekend long Mobile Media Workshop at UB and now he is back teaching a semester long Mobile Media seminar. Markert is a media-artist specializing in programming and electronics. He is a member of the Urban Research Institute for Public Art and Urban Ethology. He researches into intuitive musical interfaces and develops, “various interactive sensory devices which he has used for installations and as musical instruments. The focus of his work is exploring cybernetic interaction systems through intuitive and interactive realtime sensory processing thereby overruling hierarchic receptional mechanisms in art.”

DMS 550 METHODS OF MAKING II
Staff :: T/TH  6 – 7:50pm :: CFA 246
Reg#23938
Lab Fee – $100

“This graduate level course will explore the foundation of technical and conceptual skills necessary for advanced study in computational media through a series of intensive short projects focusing on embedded systems and electronics. This course introduces concepts and techniques for creating objects, spaces and media that sense and respond to their physical surroundings and the actions and events that transpire there. Moving beyond the interface paradigm of screen, keyboard and mouse, physical computing enables alternate models for interaction with (and through) computers that afford more subtle and complex relations between a range of human and non-human actors.”

DMS 580 METHODS OF MAKING I
Staff :: F 1 – 4:40 :: cfa286
Reg#24086
Lab fee – $100


This graduate level course explores the media of film, video, and audio through a series of short projects geared toward providing an overview of production methods and establishing a basic proficiency in the ever-changing field of media production. Improvement of technical skills is emphasized and creativity encouraged. Primarily aimed at incoming Media Study MFA students, the course also offers an introduction to the array of equipment and facilities available in the Media Study Department. Students are given specific, hands-on instruction in production, post-production and distribution. A lab fee of $100 is assessed for this course.
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DMS 598 PROJECT SUPERVISION (1 – 6 CR. VARIABLE)

Permission of Instructor
A student may enroll for this course after completing course requirements and while working on the thesis project. This course is for non-written projects only. One to six credits of the “project supervision” may be applied toward the MAH degree. Course syllabus form should be prepared prior to semester start and one copy should be on file in the Media Study office. Lab fee: $100. For registration information, see Ann Mangan in 231 CFA.

DMS 599 SUPERVISED TEACHING (4 CR. VARIABLE)
Permission of Instructor
See Ann Mangan in 231 CFA.

DMS 600 INDEPENDENT STUDY (1 – 8 CR. VARIABLE)

Permission of Instructor
A student may enroll for this course after completing course requirements and while working on the thesis project. This course is for non-written projects only. One to six credits of the “project supervision” may be applied toward the MAH degree. Course syllabus form should be prepared prior to semester start and one copy should be on file in the Media Study office. Lab fee: $100. For registration information, see Ann Mangan in 231 CFA.

DMS 603 THESIS WRITING (3RD YEAR +)
Anstey :: F 9am -12:40pm :: cfa232
Reg#23941


In this course students will focus on academic writing, with the goal of drafting and editing the written component of their thesis/dissertation (or preparing a scholarly paper for publication.) Students should already have a research proposal and bibliography. This course is for people whose research is substantively worked out who want support and feedback as they write.

DMS 605 MEDIA THEORY POETICS: READINGS
Glazier :: T 1 – 4:40PM :: cfa232
Reg#23498


Media Theory Poetics: Close Readings provides graduate level emphasis in contemporary media theory where, over the course of the semester, we CLOSE READ select texts in contemporary media theory. (“Poetics” here does not refer to “poetry” in any direct way but to “poiesis”, theories of “making” as in “making” in media.) Fundamentally, what is addressed, piece by piece and in a cumulative manner, is how a canon — your own media theory canon — can be constituted. Clearly, no single master list can ever serve everyone. The course provides ONE tactic among many in an attempt to reveal the keys to creating an approach to theory, to personal canon building, to creating a theoretical environment that situates your making within a research context. “CLOSE READING” here means taking selected texts, one by one, investigating what really is said, how it is articulated in language, and deliberating what it might mean conceptually. Through this process, our aim is to read material that is at the center of media theory (or, more accurately, at one of its many expressive peripheries) as readers, as writers (of theses, articles, and dissertations), and as participants in a shared, communal conversation. The “poetics” in this process is to read texts in a manner that we investigate theoretical writing as literature itself: it text itself but it also sets into motion mechanisms suggesting ideas beyond literal description. Since one of the seminar’s emphases is on current and recently issued works (in addition to foundational works in the field), seminar texts will be announced shortly before the beginning of the semester. Graduate level emphasis includes works by theorists such as Ian Bogost, Craig Dworkin, Vilém Flusser, N. Katherine Hayles, Matthew Kirschenbaum, Friedrich Kittler, Marjorie Perloff, and Michel Serres, among many others. Other texts within range and resonance of our reading include those by Alexander Galloway, Jonathan Crary, Gabriel de Tarde, Tony Sampson, Gilbert Simondon, etc. Seminar work includes careful reading of a small number of texts (usually three per semester), informal presentations of specific chapters with handouts, occasional artists/reader statements on topics, plus work (with seminar feedback) on an individual student project.

DMS 627 A-X SUPERVISED READING
Staff *** :: ARR, ARR – ARR
Reg.#000000

DMS 627 SUPERVISED READING (1 – 8 CR. VARIABLE)

Permission of Instructor
This course permits a student to do independent reading in an area where no course may be given. The instructor will set the guidelines for the course on an individual basis. Course syllabus form should be prepared prior to semester start and one copy should be on file in the Media Study office. For registration info, see Ann Mangan in 231 CFA.

DMS 690 MEDIA ARTS INTERNSHIP

DMS 691 CAP CAPSTONE INTERNSHIP
ARR :: ARR – ARR
Reg.#000000

Contact the Media Study Department for registration.

DMS 700 A – W THESIS GUIDANCE
Staff *** :: ARR, ARR-ARR :: CFA ARR
Reg.#000000
Contact the department for registration.

DMS 700 STA THESIS GUIDANCE
Staff *** :: Permission of Instructor :: ARR, ARR – ARR :: CFA ARR
Reg.#000000


A student may enroll in this course after completing course requirements and while writing the thesis. This course is for the written thesis only. One to six credits of  Thesis Guidance may be applied toward an MAH degree. Permission of the instructor is required. Course syllabus form should be completed before the semester s start, and one copy should be on file with the department. For registration info, see Ann Mangan in 231 CFA.