Fall 2009

Graduate Course Descriptions (Archived)

600-level courses :: 700-level courses

500-LEVEL

DMS 513 FILMIC TEXT
Henderson :: MW 1:00pm – 2:50pm :: CFA 235 :: Grad/Undergrad
Reg #438257

This course is concerned with the diverse roles that theory has played in various close readings of film.  Those theories usually organize the energies of the text.  Tracing this process is another goal of the course.  Approaches that contextualize a film contrast with other, shorter approaches.  We will look at select shorter articles that are excellent at what they do.  There will be a close analysis of the 1970 “Collective Text by the Editors of Cahiers Du Cinema: John Ford’s Young Mr. Lincon (1939).”  It may not be too much to say that this reading launched perhaps a dozen and a half of other readings.  These include Charles Eckert’s reading of Marked Woman, Stephen Heath’s reading of Touch of Evil, Virginia Wright Wexman’s reading of Vertigo, Brian Henderson’s reading of The Searchers, Esther C.M. Yau on Yellow Eart, and David Ehrenstein’s reading of Desert Fury.  This course is an Advanced Analysis course or can also be used as an Elective.

 

DMS 515 CONSCIOUS AND COGNITION IN FACT AND FANTASY
Anstey :: TR 1:00pm – 2:50pm :: CFA 235
Reg #257098 – Mostly Grad

We produce media for conscious minds – human minds. But what is a mind? What is consciousness? what is cognition? In this seminar we will examine and experience works by artists and scientists that specifically attempt to understand the mind; to make a model of the mind; to represent and explain the mind; to mess with the mind. Texts will include: Origins of the Modern Mind: Three stages in the evolution of culture and cognition; Flight of the Mind: Virginia Woolf’s Art and Manic-Depressive Illness; Erazorhead; Total Recall; Katamari Damacy; and works by Virginia Woolf, Patricia Highsmith, Carlos Castaneda, Sigmund Freud, Alfred Hitchcock and Will Wright.

 

DMS 516 THEORY OF FILM NARRATIVE
Henderson :: MW 9:00am – 10:50am :: CFA 235
Reg #134476 Grad and Undergrad

This course is an exploration of the principal theories of film through a critical reading of texts and a close examination of films. The texts to be perused comprise several groups. Classical film theory includes Munsterburg, Kuleshov, Pudovkin, Eisenstein, Balasz, Arnheim, Bazin, and Godard. The critique of classical film theory includes Burch, Perkins, and Henderson. The course will also explore semiotics, psychoanalysis, and poststructuralism, in Barthes, Eco, Metz , Pasolini, Baudry, Heath, and in feminist film theory, including Gledhill, Mulvey, Silverman, Modleski, Doane, and Studlar. A section on avant-garde theory will include Vertov, Epstein, Deren, Brakhage, Sitney, and Michelson. These topic areas will be set in interaction throughout: e.g., Soviet editing and antirealism are continued in the avant-garde; rhetorical figures such as metaphor, metonymy, ellipsis, condensation, and displacement, can be traced in very different theoretical contexts and in close readings of individual films.

 

DMS 518 RESPONSIVE MEDIA
Conrad, E. :: TR 3:00pm – 4:50pm :: CFA 244
Reg #445303

This course will introduce the tools and techniques for authoring real-time media systems with Max/MSP/Jitter. Max is a graphical programming environment designed to handle the basic elements of media: time, interactivity, and control. MSP adds the ability capture, synthesize and manipulate audio, while Jitter does the same for video and more. Although the course will emphasize work that utilizes real-time computation�live video or sound art, interactive work, installation or performance�students may choose to apply the tools towards the creation of more traditional, or non-real-time, works such as generative, genetic or evolutionary compositions of sound and/or image. No previous experience with Max or computer programming is required, but some background in media production (video, animation, sound or music) will be very helpful. This course will satisfy the non (*) Intermediate Production course. Pre-reqs: DMS 103 orDMS 105. $100 Lab fee.!

 

DMS 519 NON-FICTION FILM ANALYSIS
Elder:: TR 11:00am – 12:50pm :: CFA 235
Reg #016702

This course examines popular American documentary films looking at diverse representations of American culture. We explore independent award-winning contemporary works with themes of gender, ethnicity, popular music, sexual orientation, murder, justice, rock stars, racism, disability and history. Particular focus is on the curious relationship between the images of reality and reality itself, and on America’s love affair with reality media. Emphasis is placed on understanding the thin shifting line between fiction and non-fiction and challenging the notion of documentary “truth.” Students develop analytical and interpretive media skills that are applicable to all film and video. Students learn non-fiction critical theory including Nichols, Winston, Ruby, and Renov and analyze artistic elements of non-fiction film and video including visual narrativity, storytelling, spontaneous camera work, editing, audio, and common elements for artistic and commercial success. The class explores different documentary styles including experimental docs, cinema verite, fake docs, diary and reflexive docs, collaborative making and cutting edge contemporary work. We address the ethical and artistic considerations of filming real people and real communities. Works of Wiseman, Pennebaker, Kopple, Maysles, Freidrich, O’Rourke, Riggs, Morris, and more. Attendance is required as well as two papers and a take-home exam. Be prepared to see a lot of great films!

 

DMS 523 PROGRAMMING GRAPHICS 1
Pape :: TR 11:00am – 12:50pm :: CFA 242
Reg #214280

This production course will introduce students to the concepts and practice of programming 3D computer graphics and audio using OpenGL and other libraries. The major focus will be on creating interactive art or games experiences by programming both graphics and sound. The course has three goals: to demystify computer code – we get behind the Graphic User Interface to the machine below; to explore the potential of programming – writing our own code means we can create customized computer tools as well as customized visuals; and to teach the fundamentals of graphics programming. Prerequisites are experience in a programming language such as Python, C, C++, or Java (DMS 121, CSE 113/4/5 or equivalent). Permission of Instructor required. Lab fee $100. Contact: dave.pape@acm.org

 

DMS 530 TECH OF PRODUCTION
Lee :: F 11:00am – 2:40pm :: CFA 278
Reg # 085705

This graduate level course will explore and experiment with the media of film, video and sound through a series of short projects geared toward establishing a proficiency in media production. Improvement of technical skills will be emphasized and creativity encouraged. This course will guide students through the acronymic maze of HD and SD, BNC, VGA, RCA and HDMI, mpeg2 and h.264; through circles of confusion surrounding film stocks, F-stops and depth of field; sample rates, signal to noise and pick-up patterns. Students will be introduced to the array of equipment available to them in the Media Study Department, from 16mm film loopers to the latest solid-state high-definition camcorders, and will be given hands-on instruction as to their use. Other specific topics to be covered will include film and video formats, camcorders and projectors; compositional concepts and shooting techniques; sound recording & editing; lighting for the studio and the field; digital video editing (Final Cut Pro) and DVD authoring (DVD Studio Pro); preparing video for the web and additional topics to be decided. Regular screenings of experimental, documentary and narrative work will be included. A lab fee of $100 is assessed for this course.

 

DMS 537 INTRODUCTION TO NEW MEDIA
Larsen :: M W, 5:00 PM – 6:50 PM :: CFA 244
REG#268502

Introduction to New Media is designed to give students a firm basis in the fundamentals of website design and authoring, as well as to explore current web technologies. To create websites, we will begin by coding HTML and CSS “by hand,” gradually adding the use of popular software tools like Dreamweaver, Photoshop and Flash. Students should finish this course with a good ability to create attractive websites and knowledge of the fundamentals required to engage with online developer communities to further advance skills on their own, pursue advanced coursework in web development, or both. Lab fee $100.

 

DMS 598 PROJECT SUPERVISION (1 – 6 CR. VARIABLE)
Permission of Instructor

A student may enroll for this course after completing course requirements and while working on the thesis project. This course is for non-written projects only. One to six credits of the “project supervision” may be applied toward the MAH degree. Course syllabus form should be prepared prior to semester start and one copy should be on file in the Media Study office. Lab fee: $100. For registration information, see Nancy King in 231 CFA.

 

DMS 599 SUPERVISED TEACHING (4 CR. VARIABLE)
Permission of Instructor

See Nancy King in 231 CFA.

600-LEVEL

 

DMS 600 INDEPENDENT STUDY (1 – 8 CR. VARIABLE)
Permission of Instructor

Students may arrange for special courses of study with faculty through “independent study.” The instructor will set the guideline for the course on an individual basis. It permits the student to study independently in an area where no course is given. Course syllabus form should be prepared prior too semester start and one copy should be on file in the Media Study office. For registration info, see Nancy King in 231 CFA. Lab Fee: $100. For registration information, see Nancy King in 231 CFA.

 

DMS 603 MEDIA LANDSCAPES
Rueb, T. :: TR 11:00am – 12:50pm :: CFA 232 :: Fall Graduate Seminar
REG#222053

This production course addresses technical and aesthetic issues in locative media and landscape-scale media projects, including experimental film and video.  Specific instruction in the making of locative media and site-based projects will open onto a broader critical inquiry into the cultural construction and representation of landscape across a variety of media from film, video, photography and sound, to installation and performance.  Occasional readings will be drawn from a variety of fields including media studies, art, architecture, transportation, infrastructure and landscape design. Lab Fee: $100

 

DMS 604 CON MEDIA ARTS PRODUCTION
Conrad, A.S. :: T 5:00pm – 8:50pm :: CFA 278 :: Fall Graduate Seminar
REG#382329

Media Art Production Today is a symposium for graduate students who are already active in film, video, digital, documentary, or theory. We will explore contemporary premises for producing media art works, through readings and discussions, by examining our own and others’ media work, and in the course of producing new work to test our ideas. Main topics include: (1) the migration of experimental independent media art from alternative spaces into the gallery and onto the internet in this decade, (2) new historical perspectives that encourage a rethinking of the contemporary media arts scene, and (3) recent European and New York gallery installations and other media activity.

The methodology and end goals of this course are practical. Be prepared to experiment, to change, to produce. Course meetings will include discussions of the readings and the production activities of the participants. A part of this course will be conducted by remote learning by the instructor, from studio, gallery, and other sites in New York and Europe. Efforts will be made to have direct contact with artists and curators in the field. Each participant will be assigned an in-class presentation on a theoretical text or a contemporary artist’s work. In addition, each student will be expected to make, share, and participate in successful work or writing consistent with their chosen goals (and focusing on a direction for their thesis project). There will be no exams, quizzes, or grading criteria other than: 1) regular participation in the course meetings, and 2) progress in the conceptualization and realization of your own work, as reported by you at the end of the semester. If this is taken as a production course, there will be a $100 lab fee.

 

 

DMS 608 MOVEMENT DOCUMENTATION
Caplan, E B :: W 1:00pm – 4:40pm :: CFA 278
REG#219990

Dance in media enjoys wide recognition in world culture and in art practice. The Department of Media Study and Department of Theater and Dance propose a joint course in learning how to document performance for camera. This intensive production class will be co-taught in two separate studio locations by Elliot Caplan, Professor/Film, and Melanie Aceto, Assistant Professor/Dance. DMS students will have the opportunity to observe and document Modern 5 dance technique class with cameras for the purpose of learning how to photograph the moving body in space. Through weekly, repeated exposure to selected movement phrases, students will collect, create and assemble edited movement sequences. Students will be guided in the recording process step-by-step through lecture demos by both professors to include camera-specific activities as related to theatrical performing space, exercises in perception, looking at dance and learning its terms through choreographic tools including change of space, relative front, force, repetition, and solo vs. group/unison/cannon. Selected films will be screened and discussed as well as examples from painting, photography and architecture. Students will be given the opportunity to explore the world of dance on film.

 

DMS 610 MEDIA ROBOTICS III : COLLECTIVE INTELLIGENCE
Bohlen, M :: M W11:00 AM – 12:50 PM :: CFA 246
REG#396007

This semester’s version of MediaRobotics III will address the problem of finding meaning in large and diverse sources of information. Product recommendations, social bookmarking, and matchmaking all rely on finding patterns in large amounts of data. Sometimes truly interesting details emerge from data collected from large groups, whether they be people, animals, plants, weather patterns, bacteria, or genes. The knowledge gained from large groups is sometimes referred to as collective intelligence. This course will introduce students to the strange things that emerge from the collaboration and competition of many individuals.

 

The course will deal with concepts, methods and computational procedures that allow one to address collective intelligence phenomena. Students should expect a challenging course that will open new venues for creative and analytical work. We will work with the open source programming language python for the programing assignments. Prerequisite: MediaRobotics I, Physical Computing or consent of instructor.

DMS 627 SUPERVISED READING (1 – 8 CR. VARIABLE)
Permission of Instructor

This course permits a student to do independent reading in an area where no course may be given. The instructor will set the guidelines for the course on an individual basis. Course syllabus form should be prepared prior too semester start and one copy should be on file in the Media Study office. For registration info, see Nancy King in 231 CFA. Lab Fee: $100

 

 

DMS 627 A-X SUPERVISED READING
Staff *** :: ARR, ARR – ARR
Reg.#000000

Contact the Media Study Department for registration.

 

DMS 690 MEDIA ARTS INTERNSHIP

 

DMS 691 CAP CAPSTONE INTERNSHIP
ARR :: ARR – ARR
Reg.#000000

Contact the Media Study Department for registration.

700-LEVEL

 

DMS 700 STA THESIS GUIDANCE
Staff *** :: Permission of Instructor :: ARR, ARR – ARR :: CFA ARR
Reg.#000000

A student may enroll in this course after completing course requirements and while writing the thesis. This course is for the written thesis only. One to six credits of  Thesis Guidance may be applied toward an MAH degree. Permission of the instructor is required. Course syllabus form should be completed before the semester s start, and one copy should be on file with the department. For registration info, see Nancy King in 231 CFA.

 

DMS 700 A – W THESIS GUIDANCE
Staff *** :: ARR, ARR-ARR :: CFA ARR
Reg.#000000

Contact the department for registration.